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Thread: Salt and Corrosion Concerns

  1. #1
    Member DMan's Avatar
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    Default Salt and Corrosion Concerns

    Anyone using Salt Away Product on their aluminum boats?

    I have been considering storing my boat in Whittier and am concerned about corrosion since I won't be able to take the time to wash with soap and water. Thnking of spraying the Salt Away on the boat and then rinsing with the hose by the middle launch before I park the boat.

    What are others doing to protect their boats besides sharkhide...
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  2. #2
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    I'd say rinse thoroughly with water at the ramp and call her good. I don't think there's anything to be gained beyond a thorough rinse.

    Aluminum boats are doomed to turn grey (unless you fight tooth and nail with sharkhide and the like), and they end up looking somewhat industrial. The dull colored oxidation layer on the surface of marine grade aluminum is what protects the good metal beneath - it adheres to the good metal much more tightly than with steel, for example.

    I'd be far more worried about general corrosion when it's in the water, due to deterioration of or lack of a proper zinc on your hull. In my mind, there's no place for a bolted-on zinc on a tin boat meant for saltwater use - find one of those big zinc plates with the heavy aluminum welding ears, and have someone weld that below the waterline on the stern of your boat. Replace it when the zinc is 2/3 the size of new, or thereabouts. If you trailer your boat, the zinc should last many seasons before needing replacement. Tin boats kept in moorage, particularly in a "hot" marina with stray electrical current in the water, will go through zincs more quickly.

  3. #3
    Member DMan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    I'd say rinse thoroughly with water at the ramp and call her good. I don't think there's anything to be gained beyond a thorough rinse.

    Aluminum boats are doomed to turn grey (unless you fight tooth and nail with sharkhide and the like), and they end up looking somewhat industrial. The dull colored oxidation layer on the surface of marine grade aluminum is what protects the good metal beneath - it adheres to the good metal much more tightly than with steel, for example.

    I'd be far more worried about general corrosion when it's in the water, due to deterioration of or lack of a proper zinc on your hull. In my mind, there's no place for a bolted-on zinc on a tin boat meant for saltwater use - find one of those big zinc plates with the heavy aluminum welding ears, and have someone weld that below the waterline on the stern of your boat. Replace it when the zinc is 2/3 the size of new, or thereabouts. If you trailer your boat, the zinc should last many seasons before needing replacement. Tin boats kept in moorage, particularly in a "hot" marina with stray electrical current in the water, will go through zincs more quickly.
    I hear ya, I don't mind the dull gray look I just don't want the nasty white corrosion spots you see when you walk through about any boat yard. I have seen some metal boats that looked 20 years old when they are only 3 and vise versa.

    I just wasn't sure if spraying with clean water alone was enough to keep the boat from getting nasty...
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  4. #4

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    I started with the inline dispenser and small jug of Salt Away package in '03. I start by flushing both motors through muffs then shoot the backs of the brake plates and then spray down the boat and trailer. One dispenser does my two motors, triple axle trailer and 28' boat and the pale blue fluid left in the dispenser I pour into a spray bottle that I carry with me to spray down the windows/Isinglass when we are out. You do not rinse it off and it works well. Pulled the trailer axles apart this last year and the brakes looked great. During the trailer work I rigged up an axle flushing system and put the hose bib quick connects on everything to facilitate exchanging between the motor muffs, axle flush and sprayer. Salt Away is expensive up front but goes a long ways and has worked as advertised for me.

  5. #5
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Default Salt Away

    I've been using it on the ocean boat as an engine flush, it's an inbord 3.0L gas motor. I assume it's working but have zero proof. I heard about it a few years back on the jet boat website and thought it's an inexpensive insurance if it works as people claim. Glad to hear others are using it also.
    I think the initial "kit" from West Marine was around $30-40.00 bucks. The refill or solution is fairly cheap and they carry it also. I still haven't used up the "kit" bottle in 2 years now. Good luck.
    BK

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