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Thread: Aluminum to Carbon Arrows?

  1. #1
    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Default Aluminum to Carbon Arrows?

    I've been shooting my original dozen Easton aluminum arrows for about 10 years now. I am down to about 7 shooters, 3 of which I keep for hunting purposes only. I have had to refletch a few over the years, and a few were either lost and/or broken or bent. (note - I took a few years off shooting too) So I've been thinking of switching over to carbon since I basically am at the point that it is time to buy some new ones.

    What do you guys think on switching over? I assume I could head down to a place like Archer's Den or Backcountry archery and they could match up an arrow to my bow as far as specific arrow? I am shooting an old Browning compound (about 10 years old). I just replaced my sight, and am thinking of switching over to a whisker biscuit. I'd love to get a new bow, which would probably require a whole new set of arrows, but am thinking other toys are needed first.

    I am thinking of buying just 1-2 arrows of different brands/weights rather than buy a whole dozen only to find out they didn't quite work that great with my bow setup.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Go talk to Paul at the Archer's Den. He won't steer you wrong just to make a buck. He's honest and informative to a fault, and has my complete trust when it comes to gear advice.

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    Go to one of the pro shops and shoot their arrows. I am not sure if anyone will sell you a couple arrows. Most of the time arrow only come in 1/2 or full dozen.

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    Default arrows

    Went through the same switch myself a couple years back. I think its a good idea to try a few carbons before you go whole hog. It also depends on your bow. My old ultramax liked the old easton 2315s alot better than the carbons. Felt better, shot better, and more forgiving with those telephone poles. On the other hand, carbons are awesome in the newer parallel limb switchback XT. Like throwing darts. Of course both work just fine for critters - they don't seem to care what arrow they get shot with.

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Yes

    Yes Archerers Den or Fletchers are both fine. I would take my bow with me. Your rest may have to be adjused because of the smaller diameter arrows.

    I like a little heavier arrow too. I don't feel the need for speed up here. I don't feel the need for energy. So I shoot a little over 500 grains.

    Carbons = straight or borken. Not a bad concept.

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    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    Carbons = straight or borken. Not a bad concept.
    That is one of my issues right there Dave. When I went to shoot for my proficiency exam to get the bow certification up here, I was hitting dead on with a couple arrows, and then one of my arrows was off quite a bit. After I missed with it the second time, I quit shooting it. The rest of my shots were spot on. I shot it many times as soon as I got home and I couldn't hit square for the life of me. Did a little homemade type test to check straightness, and sure enough, it had some bend in it. Not super noticeable, but certainly enough to throw my arrow of about 8-10 inches at 25 yards.

  7. #7

    Default Backcountry Archery

    I can't speak to any other shop because Backcountry Archery is the only place I've been. I was told he will talk you out of spending money in his shop if he doesn't think you need it. I was in there for the first time last week to have him check out/tune up my bow. I asked him what it would cost and he said $12. After he checked everything out and made a few adjustments, he only charged me $5. I guess this is more of an advertisement for Backcountry Archery than an answer to the question, but I am sure if you went in you would get a straight, honest answer about what arrows will shoot best with your set up.

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Carbons your arrow will fly faster and flatter then your aluminum. your pin gaps will be close then Aluminum. From my experince carbon don't damage as easy as aluminum. Ther eare carbons arrows that are on the market that are pretty cheap. I have no experince in them
    I have shot
    PSE pro- very fast and light arrow. Would not hunt with thse.

    Gold Tip 7595 pro hunter and hunter. they are good hunting arrow for the money.

    FMJ 400 I just pick these up a carbon aluminum wrap. Love them but they cost some money

    I shot for many year the easton 2413 aluminum and was happy with them. But I do not regret making the switch.

    Carobon- pros fly faster, flatter
    Carbon- cons They can cost allot more then aluminum


    Aluminum- Pros Cheap. do there job

    Aluminum- Cons. Damage easier then carbons.


    There is allot more pros and cons on each arrow.
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    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OHAK View Post
    I can't speak to any other shop because Backcountry Archery is the only place I've been. I was told he will talk you out of spending money in his shop if he doesn't think you need it. I was in there for the first time last week to have him check out/tune up my bow. I asked him what it would cost and he said $12. After he checked everything out and made a few adjustments, he only charged me $5. I guess this is more of an advertisement for Backcountry Archery than an answer to the question, but I am sure if you went in you would get a straight, honest answer about what arrows will shoot best with your set up.
    I agree, I really like backcountry a lot. I had him refletch some arrows quite awhile back and did not ask how much it would cost. Was very surprised when I went to pick them and pay the bill. He also used to live in Central California where I grew up, and worked at the archery shop there where I got started, so we generally talk about "back home" a bit. Very good guy. I shoot at his range on occasion when it is too cold out to shoot in my yard.

    That said, I would like to get to Archer's den at some point. Everyone here has said great things about that place and the owner. It is hard for me to justify driving all the way to Eagle River though when backcountry is so close. Yeah, Eagle River is not far, but much further than backcountry (I live in South Anch). As you can imagine, I've never been to Fletcher's. I think the product selection at Backcountry is pretty limited at times - maybe even more so than Archer's Den who just got up and running. If I had a day to kill, going to Fletcher's would be fun just because of their selection of product.

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    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Gray View Post
    C
    Carobon- pros fly faster, flatter
    Carbon- cons They can cost allot more then aluminum


    Aluminum- Pros Cheap. do there job

    Aluminum- Cons. Damage easier then carbons.

    Thanks for the response. To be honest, if I get some decent arrows that fly great, cost is not really a consideration. Not because I have a ton of money to throw away, but because as I said earlier - I am still shooting on my original dozen arrows that I bought over 10 years ago. I think the $60-75 I spent on them was money well spent.

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    One thing I have learned and like doing is buying shafts and fletching my own arrows. Buying shafts are allot cheaper... Once I find an arrow I want to buy I go to ebay and other web sites and compare prices to here locally. My two cents is you will like going to carbons.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Gray View Post
    One thing I have learned and like doing is buying shafts and fletching my own arrows. Buying shafts are allot cheaper... Once I find an arrow I want to buy I go to ebay and other web sites and compare prices to here locally. My two cents is you will like going to carbons.
    I already tie flies and build fly rods. Not sure I need another hobby like that. But, buying the stuff re-fletch would probably not be worth it with how little I replace them. Maybe, maybe not. I did have backcountry refletch some arrows for me - 4 or 5 I think - and probably could have another couple done again. But, it is pretty rare for me to need, so I am not sure it would be worth getting into.

    There are certainly always better deals to be had on ebay and other online sources for sure. But, I can't go shoot my bow at ebay headquarters when it is -25 out, so I'd rather support the local establishments that provide those services.

  13. #13

    Default FOB

    If you are going to make your own arrows take a look at FOBs. I haven't used them but it looks fairly simple to slide them on the shaft and add the nock. Clearance can be a consideration though.

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    Member ruvimarrow's Avatar
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    I"m not so shure of the fobs no more i have tried them and they worked fine for a while
    but once i was shooting and baang!!! my sight bubble level and a few other plastic udjusments on sight fell apart i never did find all the peaces that day.
    I think the fob exploded on its own because i had no clearence problem
    i have no clue what happend except that it was freezeing that day
    i will probably try them some more again later.
    i chronoed fobs with vanes and their was no difrence in speed
    I just like them becuase once i shred some vanes with Bhs i can cut vanes off all the way and use fobs and still use arrows

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    Default I switched back to aluminum

    Let me say I am no expert by any means. The last time I took my bow in for a tune up, the bow shop had a picture of some guys hand that had a carbon arrow splintered through it. I started asking around and was told that if you are target practicing and your arrows nick each other, that could be enough to weaken your arrow. I was also told that carbon arrows are somewhat like tires, after a length of time they start to dry rot which could cause your arrows to explode. I did a quick search on google, and lots of things on there about carbon arrows and splintering. I have no first hand experience, but just seeing that picture scared me back to aluminum arrows.


    Gary

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    Default carbon arrows

    That is why you should get into the routine habit of checking your carbon arrows for weakness. If you slightly flex an arrow and hear a crack, the arrow should be tossed. Most injuries could be avoided if guys were diligent with safety checks.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Having shot literally tens of thousands of shots with carbon arrows, I have never had one break on the shot. Every time I pull them from the target I flex them..every time. Now it's a habit and I don't forget. However, I had a friend new to archery that took a broken carbon through the hand the first time he'd ever shot that arrow..it was brand new. So, it can happen.

    I switched back to aluminum arrows for indoor target shooting last year. I had forgotten how easy they tuned. This year I switched back to aluminum for my hunting arrows and cut my tuning time/arrow sorting time down dramatically.

    The only place I use carbons anymore is for 3D, Field and FITA archery competitions. With several arrows in the same target from everyone, carbon just lasts longer and does better in the wind on the longer Field and FITA targets (80 yards and 100 yard max in these events).

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    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Having shot literally tens of thousands of shots with carbon arrows, I have never had one break on the shot. Every time I pull them from the target I flex them..every time. Now it's a habit and I don't forget. However, I had a friend new to archery that took a broken carbon through the hand the first time he'd ever shot that arrow..it was brand new. So, it can happen.
    I had never heard of the shattering carbon problem until this thread. I did some research around and it seems to be a pretty serious issue. I imagine it is very rare when taking into consideration the number of carbon arrows shot. And is likely more rare for those people that do check their arrows before each shot. I did not come across anything where it looked like somebody regularly checked their arrow after each shot and still had it explode on them. I did come across a number of posts in an archery forum I check occasionally where the standard flex test did not quite reveal a problem, but upon further review, it was clear there was a crack.

    All this to say I am now reconsidering the switch to carbon. While the safety issue seems preventable for the most part, I just don't know if I want to take the time after every shot to do an arrow inspection. I've been shooting these arrows for a long time, and when something seems out of whack, or a fletching gets loose, I will check it for straightness, etc. and repair the problem. I tend to wonder if knowing each time I shoot an arrow, if I might not have checked it thoroughly enough, it could end up exploding on me. Seems like it might leave me a little "gun shy," if that makes sense.

    Am I overreacting on this? I came across several photos of arrows through hands, forearms, etc. Not a pretty sight.

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    It has happened and will happen again some day. Just check your arrows like Akdoug said and you should be find. Aluminums can get weak points to in them. You should check them to just like carbons.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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    Quote Originally Posted by outdoortrail View Post
    Let me say I am no expert by any means. The last time I took my bow in for a tune up, the bow shop had a picture of some guys hand that had a carbon arrow splintered through it. I started asking around and was told that if you are target practicing and your arrows nick each other, that could be enough to weaken your arrow. I was also told that carbon arrows are somewhat like tires, after a length of time they start to dry rot which could cause your arrows to explode. I did a quick search on google, and lots of things on there about carbon arrows and splintering. I have no first hand experience, but just seeing that picture scared me back to aluminum arrows.


    Gary


    Don’t forget that the carbon fibers will not bio degrade in your body, so what they can’t pick out stays in your body.
    Carbon arrows can also “bruise”, damage that you can’t see but it is there… this is the reason I don’t use them.
    I was using Aluminum arrows up until today… I just bought a new 2008 Hoyt KATERA XL and I decided to use aluminum wrapped carbon arrows, I got some 400’s.
    http://www.eastonarchery.com/products/product/5

    I’m hoping these will be the best of both worlds…
    Josh
    Back in Afghanistan, I hope for the last time.

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