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Thread: Maules

  1. #1
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    Cool Maules

    Anyone know why insurance for Maules is SO HIGH? They look like affordable planes if a guy could afford to just pay cash for one. I was quoted $7,300 / year for insurance. I have a tail wheel rating but less than 10 hours of tail wheel time. Insurance for the 170, Stinson, Citabria, and PA -12/18 was much less, about $3200 / year.

    Jeff

  2. #2
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default

    Just the way the accident statistics fall. Maules get used in some pretty hairy places for hauls out hunters and meat. Lots of them get banged up. Plus they glide like a brick. Short stubby wings (but with a long cord) and a fairly short coupled landing gear make them a little challenging for a low time tailwheel pilot.
    Hot Maule pilots know how to fly the engine and prop, while us Cub types fly the wing.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  3. #3
    Member flyingfireguy's Avatar
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    Cool ouch

    I've been told that there's not a single maule in the state without some type of damage history, don't know if tha's completey true but shure sounds good!!

  4. #4
    Member High Country's Avatar
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    Alex what do you mean by flying the engine and prop?

  5. #5
    Member akmac's Avatar
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    Default flying engine and prop

    He is talking about hanging the airplane from the prop. In other words, use the power of the engine and the propeller to muscle the plane in and out of tight spots.

  6. #6

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    In essence, Alex is right. Maules take off fast and land fast, compared to Cubs anyway. The 7' shorter wing doesn't give the lift but a great many ills can be rectified by the available horsepower, if you know what to do with it.
    There's another dynamic to the insurance; Maules are considerably less expensive than say, a 180 or such and even a restored Cub. That allows a number of us to fly one that may not have the experience/money that others might and that some of us will wrap one up once in awhile. It will happen. By having the extra seating capacity in a Maule, some of our claims may be higher which leads to higher premiums. That and the other issues Alex mentioned too, they all add up.
    For comparison, while Outside I paid $1350/year for $55k hull, hangared. Up here, about $1530/year. I've changed to liability only and it's very reasonable for what I do. I also average 120-140 hours a year non-commercial, no claims and for my own peace of mind and proficiency, at least a couple of hours of dual/update a year. In the six years I had Hull on it, my premiums would average about a $100-130 a year decrease each year. I had also bought the insurance before the 9-11 debacle when Insurance companies lost their collective butts.
    Maules are a different creature from Cessnas and Cubs and unless that's all you've ever flown, spend a lot of time with one and get specific instruction. They can be quite rewarding.

  7. #7
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    Default

    And Im sure Big Rocks and Long Props didn't help the statistics either. My dad talked with one guy who said those movies brought him a lot of business

  8. #8
    Member High Country's Avatar
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    This is an interesting thread as I have just become interested in Maules. I have a Super Cub which I love and will never be without. But for me it is getting close to the time when the family will grow and the Super Cub is not a family plane. So I have been kind of looking at different options for larger aircraft.

    I have read all I can on maulepilots.org, but it just left me more confused than when I started. There are so many different models of Maule's with different configurations that I can't really tell what would be best for my mission. That mission would be the best off airport performance possible in a four seat airplane. Suggestions? Comments?

  9. #9
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    What makes Maules so much different than other aircraft? I know they are short coupled but so is the Pacer. Is it the horsepower that makes them so much different?

  10. #10
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    Default Maule great family plane

    As mentioned the landing gear is little different, so makes them a plane you fly till it stops. I flew a M 6 with a STOL kit on floats, that thing was one heck of a airplane. 60 degree bank at 35 Kts indicated and it would not even burble. First time we flew it, I thought I was going to strangle him for doing that the first turn, about 80 degrees on a hot summer day too.

    The M 7 is a little bigger but the M6 would make a great family plane if you could find a good used one, especially on floats and skis. I would guess the insurance difference is the extra seats of the Maule, your low tail wheel time, they do make a Tri Gear, that goes on floats also.

    It has great range if you want it, cruise speed is 145 Kts, gets you there pretty quick and on floats too. it did not have any nasty habits, with the additional STOL kit and the power, you could lift a good load on hot days in the Brooks Range and trust that plane to get you up, out and back. It's not a cub, but i holds a lot. I flew canoes and external loads. She is a sweet heart, you just have to watch the wheels, I would really research it and come up with a wheel system to help tame it out bit or look at what the tri wheel version would do to suit your needs with some custom fork work and tire upgrades. I think you would be real happy, 800 pounds at 145 KTS, and it's a great airplane.
    Geoff

  11. #11
    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Default Talk to the insurance people....

    There are certain criteria that cause a higher premium, not so much make/model. Horsepower is the worst and # of seats is close second costing.

    235hp (I assume) taildragger with 10hrs of tailwheel time. That's what gets you. Check into a Cessna 180 or anything else with a big engine and I'll bet its similar with your hours.

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