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Thread: Flint lock vs precussion in AK

  1. #1

    Default Flint lock vs precussion in AK

    I am getting ready to build a 62 cal ML for hunting Bear and Moose. I am having a hard time deciding what kind of lock to use flint lock or percussion. It is not for a long backcountry hunting trip, but I am still concerned about the powder in the pan not setting off. Has anyone else shot flintlock here, and how did they work? I just wanted to hear some other opinions and not rely solely on my own. Thanks

    Whitlock

  2. #2
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Do you have a flintlock already that you can kinda test out the reliability of it by hiking through the woods while its rainy out?

    If it was me I'd use a percussion lock, but im sure you really want to use a flintlock, correct?

  3. #3

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    I've used a flintlock for about 8 years in wet, snowy weather and have not had problems with ignition. However, I have not used one in a downpour, yet. If I were going out and it was raining enough to be of concern about the pan not igniting, I'd consider not priming the pan until you are ready to shoot. Keep your 4Fg in a sealed pouch or protected pocket so it stays dry, then prime before the shot. It won't make a "quick shot" much of a possibility, but you'd have a little more confidence knowing the powder was dry. If you have plenty of time before the shot, consider using a dry cloth to wipe out any excess moisture from the pan before priming. You'd also want to be sure your flint is throwing a pretty good shower of sparks down into the pan (some flints spark better than others I've found).

    A trick I've heard percussion shooters use is after they cap the nipple, they'll seal the edges of the percussion cap around the nipple with bore butter. It essentially seals the inside powder portion of the cap from outside moisture. I suppose one could do the same with the lock mechanism on a flintlock by sealing the seam between the pan and frizzen. Though I might experiment to see how well that kept moisture out before trusting that method on a hunt.

    If wet weather were a real concern, I'd go with a percussion over a flintlock just due to the more protected design of the ignition system.

  4. #4
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    I would leave the flint lock for a much dryer climate. I hunted flits in PA for years, sometimes it would go off, sometimes it would not. With out weather here in AK you might not ever get a shot off. I am sure there are people that do use them and have been successful but the cap lock will prove to be less troublesome.
    If you do go with a flint lock, practice, practice, practice. The delay can make you miss a 50 yard broadside shot.
    If you are not in Anchorage or Fairbanks, finding powder might also be a challenge.

  5. #5

    Default flinters, delays, and rain

    Delays in flinters are really old school poor quality guns. Even the old timers knew how to fix this. Some niched the plug a bit to funnel poweder to the ignition hole. Others used a liner as they do now to do essentially the same thing. Placement also takes part in how fast it fires (and times misfires). Contrary to what you'd think. If the hole is in the powder it's going to fire slower then when slightly above the level of the pan.

    Go to chambers flintlocks.. They sell a video on the subject and also dealing with the liners. If you use a flinter do it. The liner is a white lighting liner.

    Another old timer tip to using flinters in the rain is to seal the edges with candle/bees wax My family are flinters, I'm basically the only bowhunter amongst the many of us. They all use it, in snow, major rain, bad weather good weather and all have had good luck using some simple rules of thumb, many of those obvious others mentioned.

    A good flinter can and does fire almost as fast as an oldschool percussion gun. Almost being a mili second slower...almost not noticable by watching without going into slow mo and timing!

    If you'rs is slow. Try filing a water drop shaped channel in the very end of your breech plug to channel powder to the hole. Also check your hole alignment and also add a white lightning liner and you'll be a step in the right direction. Worst case scenerio is to open up your hole just a little bigger.

  6. #6

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    My biggest hesitation on getting a flinter would be access to and transport of real black powder. It's virtually impossible to buy off the road system. It's really tough to legally transport out to the remote areas for hunts. And you aren't going to be happy using a flinter with any of the subs.

    I've got a couple of friends who are long-time flinters up here, and frankly they have less problems with misfires and hangfires than any capper I've seen. Lots of extra steps and precautions, but maybe they pay more attention too.

    Have you thought of doing a swap-lock, since you're doing it yourself? Not that big a deal, if a little more expensive. But it would be kinda nice to be able to swing both ways with the same gun. I have tossed around the flinter question for a long time, and finally decided that's what I'm going to do on my next build.

  7. #7

    Default

    Thanks guys,

    I donít have a flint yet, and have always wanted to get one. I have a couple of cap locks and have wanted to get a bigger cal ML to hunt with up here. I guess I was thinking I might be able to kill two birds with one stone kind of a thing. I have not made up my mind yet, and really would like a flint lock. Brown Bear I like the switch lock idea that is something to look into. I am glad to hear that other people have had good success with the flintier up here and it is kind of pumping me up a bit to try it out my self. When I get it finished I will post a few pick of it. Thanks

    Whit

  8. #8
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    I have one of the T/C Firestorms (flintlock) I bought used and restocked in wood about 3 years back. If you are building it from scratch expect to spend some time tuning it to get the ignition fast and smooth. I never had a problem with mine in the factory plastic stock but it has taken me a lot of time to get it back to that point after the change.

    I wasn't smart enough to get with somebody with experience so I learned things the hardway. Here are a few examples on my learning curve. It seemed like every time I took it out it has rained or snowed on me. The bees wax on the edges of the pan helps a lot with that. But a wet frizzen will hurt you just as much (no spark no flame). I had the touch hole to high and had to lower the barrel in the stock. By the time I figured that out I had gotten used to putting to much powder in the pan and had to teach myself that less is better. Last I didn't lube the lock after cleaning as good as I should have the first few times out and the frizzen was hanging up on both the spring and the pivot point.

    All that being said I would do it again! I think of it as a $200 class in basic flintlock principles!

  9. #9

    Talking

    When I was growing up we shot ML's mostly. I never shot a breech loader untill I was about 12 and started shooting when I was 6. Dad always told me that nipples are for weman.

    BWM
    "Spirituality is the ultimate survival skill. When one is primarily on a spiritual quest, the desire for material objects is effectively lessened. This can make an enormous difference to us in the coming trials since we stand a big chance of losing many of our goodies. We will be in states of shock and anguish. Yet if we learn to not mind losing them, there is no loss. Material goods are to Americans as alcohol is to a drunk. In both cases, losing the craving is a benefit." Mike Oehler

    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. ~ Thomas Jefferson, to Archibald Stuart, 1791"

  10. #10
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    http://home.insightbb.com/~bspen/wetflints.html


    I stumbled across this short article on dealing with wet weather. I've been planning to build a longrifle for about 4 years now, i'm hoping to actually do it this next winter.

  11. #11

    Default thanks again

    Thanks guys,

    I appreciate all of the responses. I am going to try out a Great Plains 54 cal flintlock before I build the 62 cal. Thanks for all of the tips and advice.

    Whit

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