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Thread: Possible West Coast salmon fishing ban

  1. #1
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    Default Possible West Coast salmon fishing ban

    Hello,

    I read on the A.P. where there might be a salmon fishing ban in California and Oregon. How would that affect the industry in Alaska?

    Looking for a deckhand gig in Alaska for the summer. Not sure what the ban could mean.


    Thanks,

    Scott

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    higher prices for AK fish
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    More money for Alaska? :P

  4. #4

    Unhappy

    Yes, the Feds have shut down ocean salmon fishing in Ca & Oregon due to a major decline in King's returning to the Sacramento, and other central valley rivers. Back in 2002 we were seeing 800,000 fish return. This past year under 100,000. The California economy will take a 2 billion dollar hit in lost lost revenue for all the business that supported comercial and sport fishing. Talk about recession.... Anyway Alaskan & Canadian commercial King salmon prices will probably sky rocket. May see an increase in sports fisherman heading to Alaska to fish this year?

  5. #5

    Default Wild

    I just read that article myself. That's a harsh deal, wow.

    I am wondering what effects it will have on the tourism industry up here for this year.
    Marc Theiler

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    Member LungShot's Avatar
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    It sounds like it will be good for our economy, and any positives to our economy these days are ones to cherish. The only bad thing is more bodies, and boats in the river.

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    Wow, I just read about the low returns of the Sacramento river kings. Couple that with the emergency closure of the Karluk river kings, are the population of king salmon as a whole struggling or are these unrelated incidents? How does this compare with the other salmon species? Just some questions that come to mind.
    At sea, it's force not reason that confers sovereign rights

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    theres been pretty weak runs accross the board for the last couple of year for kings its attributed to poor ocean conditions.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  9. #9

    Default hatchery shutdowns have been one reason.

    My father is on a waterboard down in Southern Oregon and he says a lot of this may be due to the cutbacks in hatchery outputs. The state of Washington heavily stockes salmon with hatcheries, but Oregon has really cut back, decreasing salmon runs significantly. There are other reasons I'm sure. My home town fishermen have been basically on welfare for the past few years.

    As for one effect, it might be a good time to go get a cheap fishing vessel unfortunately.
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildog View Post

    As for one effect, it might be a good time to go get a cheap fishing vessel unfortunately.
    Too bad the permit is rediculous nowadays
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    Too bad the permit is rediculous nowadays
    True, but I've seen some very nice conversions of old work boats into personal yachts, dive charters etc. Hmm gets me thinking.
    At sea, it's force not reason that confers sovereign rights

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    Too bad the permit is rediculous nowadays
    "The" permit? Which permit?? Some fisheries are still pretty reasonable to get into. Not halibut IFQs, mind you, but there are others that are still possible for the working stiff. (Or the non-working stiff, in the case of our college students.)

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    I've read that the Bering Sea groundfish trawl fishery caught 50,000 kings as bycatch last year. No one knows where they come from. Its a big hit no matter how far down the coast you spread them. On the Cook Inlet side of things, I sure hope our conservation concerns get addressed before we see the same situation up here! Precautionary approach now, strong runs in perpetuity. Full exploitation of all available stock now, and full shutdowns to everyone in the future. A board that shuts down a sport fishery, then expands a commercial fishery on the same stock... we're California dreaming!

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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    I've read that the Bering Sea groundfish trawl fishery caught 50,000 kings as bycatch last year. No one knows where they come from. Its a big hit no matter how far down the coast you spread them.
    Actually it's now closer to 139K!

    It's estimated that 20% of those fish would have Yukon River fish. Is it any wonder why the Yukon runs have fallen on such hard times!

    About 40% would have returned to BC/PNW waters. I wonder how many of our ESA-listed chinook died in that indiscriminate fishery?

    That leaves about 40% that would have returned to other Alaskan waters.

    The undeniable and tragic consequences of NON-selective large-scale industrial mining of our precious fish resources cannot be overstated!
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  15. #15

    Default here too?

    Beware that if they can shut it down in California and Oregon then they can do the same here.

    Beware that all the decisions being made now about harvest, escapement, "Opportunities", boat size/horsepower/4-stroke/2-stroke/drift boat, even land development (habitat destruction), mining, culvert placement, etc... etc... if they diminish the salmon returns, can and will result in a federal shutdown of the fishery.

    I applaud all those who promote what is best for the river, best for the fish, and don't place the top priority on economic benefit. If the river suffers, if the fishery is shut down, the well lubed economic engine runs out of oil & burns a valve.

    This also means that all users of PNW & Alaskan Salmon, all the folks who simply delight in knowing there are still wild runs, should be uniting and fighting against the indiscriminate wholesale slaughter of them on the high seas.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fishNphysician View Post
    Actually it's now closer to 139K!

    It's estimated that 20% of those fish would have Yukon River fish. Is it any wonder why the Yukon runs have fallen on such hard times!

    About 40% would have returned to BC/PNW waters. I wonder how many of our ESA-listed chinook died in that indiscriminate fishery?

    That leaves about 40% that would have returned to other Alaskan waters.

    The undeniable and tragic consequences of NON-selective large-scale industrial mining of our precious fish resources cannot be overstated!
    Something thing to keep in mind, any salmon stocks in the Bering sea are Russian and Asian stocks as well. That said I doubt that the processors working the Russian side of the line are reporting or at best under reporting salmon by catch. So I would more than double the 139K and I'll bet that is a more realistic number. I've worked the enforcement side of things and have seen 20 + catcher/processors working the Russian side. Before I get too far up on my high horse how else can you efficiently catch Pollock? What can be done to to influence the Russians to properly manage their fisheries? Something to think about, I guess
    At sea, it's force not reason that confers sovereign rights

  17. #17

    Default

    The King runs on Kodiak island have sure degraded the last couple of years. The Ayakulik and Karluk rivers use to average 10,000 to 12,000 fish, and the last couple of years it's been between 1,500 - 5,000 fish. In 2004 the Ayakulik had over 20,000 fish. Where have all the Kings gone? River conditions have been good. Bad ocean conditions or high seas piracy of the stocks?

    I watched the History channel the other night and how the factory ships can harvest 100 tons of Pollack on one trawl set. I can only imagine all the salmon and steelhead by catch. Like everyone said this fishery has a large negative impact on all King stocks in Alaska and the PNW.

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