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Thread: 6.5 Swede for moose?

  1. #1
    Member alaskamace's Avatar
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    Default 6.5 Swede for moose?

    Anybody use their 6.5 Swede to wack their yearly moose? If so, what bullet do you use? I have an old M96 that has been sporterized that I've been thinking about using for moose this fall.
    ..."Tolerance is the virtue of a man without convictions." - G.K. Chesterton

  2. #2

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    With good bullet placement it will work great. I'd go with heavy for caliber bullets but that isn't saying much in 6.5, seems like all those bullets are heavy for caliber.

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    Load up some 140 gr Naturalis bullets.......

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    The Hornady 160gr RN was made for moose/elk sized game and the 6.5x55. They have generally shot pretty well out of a few 96s that me and my dad have owned too. We have used them on deer, good sized exits with great blood trails.

  5. #5

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    140 Nosler partition. No problem, about 2600 in a m96 and 2700 in a ruger M77. If you are not a loader, I would think Norma will have a good 140-156 grainer.

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    The 140 grain bullets have a flatter trajectory, however at hunting ranges the 156 to 160 grain round nose bullets, (as those used with the original 1894 Swede loads) work well. They are pretty accurate and have a reputation for deep penetration.
    Last week I used a moderate load of 46 grains of RL-22 and a Rem non-mag primer, to push a 160 grain Hornady round nose soft point to 2,500 fps from a 23.5 inch barreled M/38. So a 29 inch barreled M/96 should do about 2,700 fps.
    This week I will try either mag primers or another grain of powder and get back to this forum about the velocity and accuracy.

    I also have some loads with 140 grain boat-tails that should be zipping right along. But I need to test then before posting.
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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Yearly moose. That would be great. I hunt for them yearly but only see a legal one every five years. Always fork or spike never seen one over 50" or with three brow tines during season in 22 years.

    Anyways a friend of mine has a 6.5 jap and I loaded him some 100 grain hornadys to practice with and I bought a box of Norma 156 grainers to use for moose.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

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    Default Swedish 6.5 and moose

    The Swedish dispatch thousands of moose each year with the 6.5's. Their elk (our moose) is a major game for them.

    Go with the 160... penetration is never a problem.

  9. #9

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    never a moose...

    but did shoot a Goat with 156 Norma from an original M38. Went right through her, and expanded well

    Shot several caibou with a sporter 96 and 140 gr noslers, went right through them, expanded well

    Shot a few deer with 120 Gr Nosler BT and the sotck M94/14, expanded well and went right through them

    all rib cage shots.....hope that helps.

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    I've shot several swamp donkeys with my swede 94 carbine. Used 160 gr Nosler partition handloads at not much more than 100yrds. does a fine job without a lot of waste if you happen to shoot one in the boiler room.

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    Didnt know Nosler did a 160, you mean a 140.

    A good starting load for either the 140s, 156s and the 160s is 44 gr RL22

    RL22 is the closest out there to original powder used in swede m41 ball

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    Default swede

    Yup, I lied, had to go look.They are Sierra 160's
    Does anyone know if Nosler does make 6.5,160gr?

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    Default swede

    nope on the 160 from Nolser
    I can't tell you how much I am enjoying reading the posts on this..........
    Sure ya dont want a 7stw instead? Just kidding

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Being a huge fan of the .264/6.5 in a number of different chamberings, I have found the Woodleigh 140 and 160 grain bullets do everything you could ask of any bullet.

    I just wish Geoff would make them in 120 grain also. My newest chambering in the AR-15 in 6.5 is just incredible. I enjoy the 6.5X55 over 6.5/.284 as barrel life is better.

    With the 6.5x55, and the right bullet for the job, there is nothing on this planet that won't drop at the shot (right bullet placement).

    I will always take the 6.5x55 over the .308 WINCHESTER for hunting or long range target shooting.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    I will always take the 6.5x55 over the .308 WINCHESTER

    Thems fighten words.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

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    Big Al,
    What about the 260 Remington? Comparing the 6.5x55 and the 260 Rem both loaded with 140 and 160 grain bullets, what differences should we expect, and which caliber has the advantage over the other with these two bullet weights? Thanks

  17. #17
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    I don't think everybody that shoots the 6.5X55 is a handloader. I am, therefore I like the 6.5X55 better because the brass from Lapua is available. The loading life is better and the brass quality is much better, sad to say than American made.

    I've messed with the 6.5/08 and use to really like it, if used for 600 yards it is a fine ctg. After 600 the 6.5X55 gets hard to beat. Going to a higher capacity ctg for the 6.5 really spells shorter barrel life.

    The reason I used to like the 6.5/08 was because I had a lot of vary good Lake City NM brass (7.62 NATO).

    I was shooting a 6.5/06 for moose back in the early 70's here in Alaska and before that from 1963 a .264 WINCHESTER mag. That ctg is a true barrel eater. The 6.5/06 is no slouch in eating barrels either.

    The .260 Remington 6.5/08 treats barrels nice and gives long life.

    The last 6.5 ctg I jumped on the band wagon for was the 6.5/.284, and I went back to the 6.5X55.

    Now I'm messing with the 6.5 Grendel in the AR-15. This ctg may prove to be the ultimate caribou ctg of all time for the subsistence hunter.

    I plan on having it tested this fall on the Kobuc herd. This tiny ctg out preforms the .308 WIN for wind drift, lighter recoil and for the guy that can shoot, much faster action time for multiple rapid kills.

    This little ctg is based on the .220 Russian/ 6PPC I have a lot of time with this brass type from bench rest and know what it is capable of for accuracy.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  18. #18
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    I don't think everybody that shoots the 6.5X55 is a hand-loader. I am, therefore I like the 6.5X55 better because the brass from Lapua is available. The loading life is better and the brass quality is much better, sad to say than American made.

    I've messed with the 6.5/08 and used to really like it, if used for 600 yards it is a fine ctg. After 600 the 6.5X55 gets hard to beat. Going to a higher capacity ctg for the 6.5 really spells shorter barrel life.

    The reason I used to like the 6.5/08 was because I had a lot of vary good Lake City NM brass (7.62 NATO).

    I was shooting a 6.5/06 for moose back in the early 70's here in Alaska and before that from 1963 a .264 WINCHESTER mag. That ctg is a true barrel eater. The 6.5/06 is no slouch in eating barrels either.

    The .260 Remington 6.5/08 treats barrels nice and gives long life.

    The last 6.5 ctg I jumped on the band wagon for was the 6.5/.284, and I went back to the 6.5X55.

    Now I'm messing with the 6.5 Grendel in the AR-15. This ctg may prove to be the ultimate caribou ctg of all time for the subsistence hunter.

    I plan on having it tested this fall on the Kuskokwim herd. This tiny ctg out preforms the .308 WIN for wind drift, lighter recoil and for the guy that can shoot, much faster action time for multiple rapid kills.

    This little ctg is based on the .220 Russian/ 6PPC I have a lot of time with this brass type from bench rest and know what it is capable of for accuracy.

    If I was a one rifle man, it would be a 6.5.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  19. #19

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    Experience in Sweden with the 6.5 on moose sure puts the lie on many folks claim that you need a modern magnum for the big deer. Put a bullet in the right spot, and it's going to do the job.

    But to be honest, I think the stellar record of the 6.5 in Sweden is due more to shot placement than unusually fine ballistics. You're required to pass a shooting test to qualify for a license in Sweden, and it's not an easy test.

    I'm not saying that folks here in the US should be required to pass a shooting test to get a license, but I do give the Swedes a nod for good shooting with a rifle many in the US feel is "too small" for moose. Just like blaming McDonalds for hot coffee spilling in a customer's lap, the trend to blame wounded game on the gun rather than the shooter is rampant.

    Fortunately the old Swede is a ball to shoot, so you won't feel put out having to practice with it.

  20. #20
    Member Ripper's Avatar
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    Bullet: I'd go with the 160 gr round nose.

    Yes, a lot of folks in Sweden hunt (and kill) moose with the 6.5x55. However, they wound a lot of them too. I think that is the reason that people are REQUIRED to hunt moose with a tracking dog (or have one at the ready after the shot) and are required to party hunt.

    The 6.5 is big enough for moose, but don't forget it doesn't have magnum power. As with any gun, take a good shot.

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