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Thread: Shed Hunting

  1. #1
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    Default Shed Hunting

    I am looking for any information on moose shedding hunting in Alaska. If anyone would be so kind as to help me out and let me know of some good spots or strategies it would be greatly appreciated. Really, any information on shed hunting in Alaska would be a great help. Thank You.

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    Member Bear Buster's Avatar
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    I seen a bull moose 5 days ago and he still had his antlers

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    If you find one consider yourself lucky.

    It will not be like finding whitetail deer sheds in the same places year after year.

    --

    The sheds will be where the moose winter. Usually lower elevations like riverbeds etc.

    I have never found an intact moose shed in 22 years.

    The mice like to feast on the antlers.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMiller View Post
    I have never found an intact moose shed in 22 years.
    Really? I haven't found a lot, but I've found a few. I don't know if I'll have time this year, but if so I've got a pretty good spot scoped out where moose get downright thick in early winter. There were some bi-i-i-g bulls there too, so I'm hoping for find a few good sheds.

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    It's simple,find a place that moose winter in and people don't. Creek bottoms choked with willows are the best. If you have a week or better stretch of no snow in Jan- Feb hit it hard. Other wise as the snow dissappears in the spring. I found 5 in the last month, and they were all in one drainage. Be careful though, it's extremely addicting. Good luck.

    KK

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    I know a little bit about it as my friends buy hundreds of lbs each year to carve for sale. It ain't no secret that the biggest antlersellers own airplanes
    The only guy I ever saw get A LOT of moose sheds without a plane owns a HUGE farm where for some reason the local moose liked to drop their sheds on.
    I found 3 sheds (one side) last year putting on a real lot of miles on my atv. I'm sure you could stumble around all summer on foot in alaska and not find one worth packing out. They get chewed on and deteriorate fast.
    I'd guess you find them where ever the moose drop them, not much help, I know

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    Talking

    yes, the moose antlers get chewed by mice, but more often by bears...based on what i have seen the bears do alot more damage to an antler than the rodents.

    watch out for one other pitfall...once you find your first big, brown, unchewed moose shed, the first thing you should do is put your nose to it...if it smells like it has been dipped in bull piss leave it lay cuz that "wonderful" smell never goes away!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Berto View Post
    yes, the moose antlers get chewed by mice, but more often by bears...based on what i have seen the bears do alot more damage to an antler than the rodents.

    watch out for one other pitfall...once you find your first big, brown, unchewed moose shed, the first thing you should do is put your nose to it...if it smells like it has been dipped in bull piss leave it lay cuz that "wonderful" smell never goes away!
    Never heard of this and my friends go thru hundreds of lbs of sheds. at $8-10 a lb I'd still pick it up no matter what it smelled like.

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Wow 8-10 dollars a pound.
    I may have to look a little harder.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

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    Quote Originally Posted by RMiller View Post
    If you find one consider yourself lucky.

    It will not be like finding whitetail deer sheds in the same places year after year.

    --

    The sheds will be where the moose winter. Usually lower elevations like riverbeds etc.

    I have never found an intact moose shed in 22 years.

    The mice like to feast on the antlers.

    I've hunted whitetails for 16 years before coming to Alaska...bow, gun, muzzle loader, up to 40 days in the field per year and I've found two or three that weren't ancient and ragged. In contrast, in 5 years up here I've found three full heads of dead moose, and a half dozen decent sheds...and i don't really even look, I find em when I'm out doing other stuff, those that concentrate on it find more than they really care to carry...and just take the nice ones.

    When I first found em I brought them all home...now it's to the point I leave em lie..maybe take a pic or if it's a really neat one, I'll pack it out. Then again, I have little interest in selling them...they serve a purpose out there in the sticks too.

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    I work all over Anchorage and in Dec. and Jan the bulls don't move around much so I make a note when I see them in places with out much human traffic. When I start seeing moose with one horn and no horns, I start cruising the areas where I saw bulls. Follow the fresh tracks I found a couple this year. If its snowing a lot when they lose they're horns you won't find much in Feb. But I'm heading out this weekend to look as the snow is going away fast.

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    You could dream of shed hunting like these pros:
    http://www.alaskaantlerworks.com/she...ing_alaska.htm

  13. #13

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    Some shed hunters are CRAZY about it. Lots of people out looking can also make it hard to find'em.

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    Quote Originally Posted by whitepalm View Post
    Some shed hunters are CRAZY about it. Lots of people out looking can also make it hard to find'em.
    It's also important to wait till things get HOT and you can DIG them out of the snow.

  15. #15

    Default In Denial

    I used to be afflicted with that accursed madness. Thank God I am over it. My doctor thinks one day I may be able to walk in the woods again without thinking about shed hunting. I was lucky, it only took me a thousand plus whitetail sheds to kick the habit. Now that I live in Alaska and don't own an airplane I have nothing to worry about. Did you say moose sheds?.....Hmmmm...Now you've got me thinking. Where would a big bull live through winter safely? Where would he feed? During what month would his antlers drop? (I used to pick up sheds weeks and months before anybody else was in the woods.) When the bulls shed and you've discovered where they winter, if the snow isn't too deep, you might find them before the next snow covers them. Big bulls may drop their antlers before smaller bulls, I found this to generally be true with whitetails. This kept many people out of the woods because they,"Just saw a buck yesterday." Spring snow should give you a chance to cover alot of country on snowshoes. Of course you would just be looking for a small piece of antler sticking through the snow. Binoculars help you cover more ground. After the snow melts and before the brush starts to leaf out cover as much ground as you can through prime wintering range.A few tricks to get you started, spend time in the woods and you will learn the rest. My ideas worked well with deer, they might give you a little help with moose. By the way, if you are successful don't sell by the pound. You are selling to a middleman. I kept most of mine after I dealt with a few dirt eaters. My wife loves the boxes and boxes of antlers.

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    Default no luck

    Found a few last spring. One of them was out in the open on the ice. Not too hard to find! Mostly you just have to be in the right areas and just spend the time wandering around looking. I was just out yesterday and did not find any, but I did see something that was pretty cool. There were a bunch of very fresh wolf tracks on the trail I was on, it had just snowed a little first thing in the morning. Anyway they broke off of the trail, and I followed them. I found where they had tore apart something. It took a lot of looking but I found what was left of the skull and realized that it was a wolverine! I could not believe how little was left of that critter. just a few polished bones, and bits of hide! Not everyday you find something like that. Too bad I wasn't a few hours earlier I might have had a chance at a wolf.

  17. #17
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    My dog Tucker finds 3 to my 1. The floor of my cabin is covered with his finds as he gets to keep the ones he finds. He used to chew them but now just carries them around.
    Biggest I have found were in the mountains. The most I have found were on river bottoms.
    The neatest I found was a bear kill (the nose was caved in) and it went 65".
    Great fun on an early spring day!
    Live life and love it
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  18. #18

    Default wintering areas

    Find where they winter and you will find sheds. I usually go out in mid april when the snow is melted pretty good and cruise a creek bed where the moose winter in Nov. and Dec. One trail breaking trip in Dec. I found 4 right in the trail. That was pure luck though. Largest set found estimated 66" and weighed 44#'s. Sold that set for $750.

  19. #19

    Default Not all have fallen....

    Well, all this talk about shed hunting....some quick hands and you might be able to get some really fresh ones. I just about ran into this guy while out biking near the Campbell Creek Science Center this evening. This is probably the latest I have seen one walking around with his antlers from last season. Wonder if they get a bit testy when they stay on this long? This guy really wasn't in any mood to give way on the trail, even looked a little miffed that I was taking his picture.
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  20. #20

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    I had a fork horn standing at the end of my driveway last night. I was a little surprised he was still carrying his antlers. I recall seeing him about a month ago and thinking "Ah, he'll be dropping those any day now..." Oh well, the longer he carries them, the less chance they'll get buried by any recent snow fall, and thus the easier it'll be fore me to find them!

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