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Thread: Goat hunting experts, need advise......

  1. #1
    New member AKDSLDOG's Avatar
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    Default Goat hunting experts, need advise......

    Wanted to pick your brains a bit about goat hunting. I drew a goat tag for a area that I have been putting in for years and would like all the info on these critters as possible. I am a experianced sheep hunter (not expert).

    Do goats act alot like sheep?

    Eye sight as good as sheep?

    Do Stocking method's differ, as in, get above them?

    etc. etc......

    Any info at all would be greatly appericiated.

    Thanks Curt

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    I've hunted goats twice, once in the Kenai and once on Kodiak, don't consider myself an expert but here are some observations. Goats hang out in terrain that is tougher than what sheep inhabit. Goats seem to be a lot less wary than sheep. If you don't try and get between them and their escape route they will watch you but don't seem to get too excited. The terrain was more of a hindrance to getting close than the wariness of the goats.

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    Default one difference

    Also not an expert, but spent a little time around and chasing after goats. In my opinion, one difference is that spooked sheep are gone - goats never seem to go anywhere in a hurry. They'll stare at you a bit... climb a ways... stare some more... etc. They seem to trust that nothing below can get at them in their rocky home.


    Quote Originally Posted by AKDSLDOG View Post
    Wanted to pick your brains a bit about goat hunting. I drew a goat tag for a area that I have been putting in for years and would like all the info on these critters as possible. I am a experianced sheep hunter (not expert).

    Do goats act alot like sheep?

    Eye sight as good as sheep?

    Do Stocking method's differ, as in, get above them?

    etc. etc......

    Any info at all would be greatly appericiated.

    Thanks Curt
    Everything that lives and moves will be food for you.
    Genesis 9:3

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    caribou in the rocks.....is what they are. sheep they are not. some aspects of sheep are easier at least where i hunt sheep, terrian is easier than the goat country i've hunted, weather is typically nicer hunting sheep as well. goats are way funner.
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    The Mountain Goat Challenge might be worth a read as we wait out the last month or two before accessing goat terrain is really feasible. Once late May or June rolls around, you should go down and climb up above Tern Lake. Spend some time up there watching goats - there's no better way to learn about their behavior.

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    Default a few things I've noticed

    If you can get on top of the goats you will have a huge advantage. They seldom look up because most of the danger comes from below. While being above sheep is a good thing too, they do look up, down, and around which keeps you on your toes.

    Goats are seldom far from escape cover (meaning the steep stuff) so half the battle is getting into a position where you can anchor them before they take a suicidal kick off into oblivion...if in doubt of retrieving the animal I'd pass on the shot.

    As Carnivore noted the goats don't react to danger quite the same as sheep. Every step they seem to take is well calculated and thought out. Their eyesight and nose seem to be everything a sheep's is from my observations.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Austin View Post
    Goats are seldom far from escape cover (meaning the steep stuff) so half the battle is getting into a position where you can anchor them before they take a suicidal kick off into oblivion...if in doubt of retrieving the animal I'd pass on the shot.
    So how to bowhunters take this frequent advice into account? I always hear that you should try to anchor a goat right away, but that's not really possible with an arrow. I'm hoping to bowhunt goats this fall, but I'm certainly not going to pass a shot just because escape cover is 50+ yards away.

    So bowhunters...do you factor that into your shot? Since there's not really a way to anchor a goat with an arrow, do you even consider it?

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    Default Mountain Goats

    There is a reason they call them mountain goats. Because they are on top of mountains. Best thing to do is to start getting into shape. Walking up hill, treadmill, carry a pack, ankle weights .... anything.

    Plan on carrying a 35-40 pound pack for a 3-4 day hunt.

    There are also a few good books in the online store on this site. I think I own about 4 of them. The sheep hunting books are good too. Any idea that you can gleam from any of the books is worth it.

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    Brian, I've personally never shot one with a bow so I won't claim experience, though I know several folks who have. I think the same concepts apply for the most part, you just need to be aware of the potential fall zones of the animal and be prepared to go through an ordeal to retrieve it. The last one I shot got a "last kick" on me and I watched in horror as it went tumbling down 650' of cliff. It took me awhile but I figured a route down to retrieve it...and lived to tell the tale! Knowing your routes in advance will help you make a decision to shoot or not.

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    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    would never claim to be expert but have hunted them 20 or more times mostly with bow, have rifled two - but lost one- 1800 foot chute to the ocean, have helped others take 8-10 goats. have missed two with my bow. one trip we rifled 3 in one day WOW what a trip. left $1800 in gear on the mtn. to catch train out of Whittier.

    BOAT CABIN 8 FOOT WIDE
    have nine weeks planned for goat this fall - turn 59 tomorrow (less than an hour from now) and my goal is to arrow a goat before i turn 60 not sure how many more goat hunts i have left in me. aweful tough hunts just miserable....but my favorite animal to hunt.
    goats are similar to sheep that they are white, 4 legs and live in mtns.

    weather and terrain is much worse for goats....generally
    goats frequently bed about 9-10 until 2 or so. so you have roughly 4 hours to get within range and shoot one. frequently you can aopproach within 300-500 yards off to the side and they will not be alarmed . then if you disappear they seem to forget about you.
    also they can not count . once we got caught in open by two very nice billies 300 yards away. i stayed in open milling around partner dropped out of sight and got within 100 yards of them......but missed shot
    i do not think their eye sight is as good but just might be they do not get alarmed as quickly.

    have long handled mtn. axe ( good for walking stick and if you fall and slide you can get stopped. and instep crampons i also carry 175 feet of rope. 5-6 mm climbing rope but 3/8 " poly will work well in most cases. not heavy enough to repel with but acts as good safety line in step stuff

    to answer question about anchoring them with a bow????? i think it is like other animals shot with a bow no big bang and they do not get adrenalin going like when rifle shot. may think just hit by falling rock or if they see you they move away to safe distance get weak lay down and die......have never got one with a bow so this just my thought process.
    good luck
    What area did you Draw?
    Last edited by AK NIMROD; 03-11-2008 at 00:39. Reason: ADDED PIX
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  11. #11
    New member AKDSLDOG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK NIMROD View Post
    would never claim to be expert but have hunted them 20 or more times mostly with bow, have rifled two - but lost one- 1800 foot chute to the ocean, have helped others take 8-10 goats. have missed two with my bow. one trip we rifled 3 in one day WOW what a trip. left $1800 in gear on the mtn. to catch train out of Whittier.

    BOAT CABIN 8 FOOT WIDE
    have nine weeks planned for goat this fall - turn 59 tomorrow (less than an hour from now) and my goal is to arrow a goat before i turn 60 not sure how many more goat hunts i have left in me. aweful tough hunts just miserable....but my favorite animal to hunt.
    goats are similar to sheep that they are white, 4 legs and live in mtns.

    weather and terrain is much worse for goats....generally
    goats frequently bed about 9-10 until 2 or so. so you have roughly 4 hours to get within range and shoot one. frequently you can aopproach within 300-500 yards off to the side and they will not be alarmed . then if you disappear they seem to forget about you.
    also they can not count . once we got caught in open by two very nice billies 300 yards away. i stayed in open milling around partner dropped out of sight and got within 100 yards of them......but missed shot
    i do not think their eye sight is as good but just might be they do not get alarmed as quickly.

    have long handled mtn. axe ( good for walking stick and if you fall and slide you can get stopped. and instep crampons i also carry 175 feet of rope. 5-6 mm climbing rope but 3/8 " poly will work well in most cases. not heavy enough to repel with but acts as good safety line in step stuff

    to answer question about anchoring them with a bow????? i think it is like other animals shot with a bow no big bang and they do not get adrenalin going like when rifle shot. may think just hit by falling rock or if they see you they move away to safe distance get weak lay down and die......have never got one with a bow so this just my thought process.
    good luck
    What area did you Draw?
    Great info, thanks! I drew DG360 Dixon Glacier (across from homer).

  12. #12
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    You Are Welcome.
    Was Hoping To Give Info If It Was An Area I Had Hunted Never Have Hunted Down There Mostly- Whidbey Bay And Pws.
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
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    Default Ice Axe

    Bring an Ice Axe and Crampons...I have taken 3 goats. Two of them nearly did me in...The Ice Axe saved my hide.

    If you don't get any feedback abotu Dixon Glacier I can put you in contact with a guy I know who has been there once for sure, maybe twice.

    Let me know.
    -Jay-

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    Member Dan W's Avatar
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    Brian,

    I've only rifled goat, but am a bowhunter (trad) as well. I think the comment above is right on. You need to not startle the animal and slide an arrow through both lungs. You'll want the animal to preferably be say 30 yards plus from escape habitat that you can't follow him into. If everything goes as planned, you double lung him, he makes a little kick at the wound with a back legs and looks around for 15 seconds, wobbles, then falls over.

    Goats don't necessarily need a precipice to have an issue on your hands. They are kind of built like a barrel and will roll quite well down a 45 degree slope....this I know from experience!

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