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Thread: Dude, Where's my skiff?

  1. #1
    Member Border Justice's Avatar
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    Default Dude, Where's my skiff?

    Over and over we hear horror stories of huge tide changes, rocky shores, massive tidal flats, etc. I'm headed to Kuiu and I'm going to use a skiff around the east side of the island. I'm camping at Devil's Elbow and working south around Three Arm, Seclusion, No Name, etc.

    What's the best way (besides just knowing tide tables) to tie up or beach my boat without being dry-docked for hours. Is there any way to avoid it if you only want to go ashore in an area for a couple hours?
    "America sleeps safely in her bed because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do her harm."

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  2. #2

    Default Free Float

    I would have plenty of anchor rope- 200- 300 500 feet to do a "Free Float" And i would study the tide tables

  3. #3
    Member Cliffhanger's Avatar
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    Default Good Thread

    Dude-
    Check out this previous thread....jim

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ight=anchoring

  4. #4

    Default Mines always waiting in the water

    Well this idea was given to me back in the 70's, not 100% but would bet 90%. Only time it failed was if the rope to anchor got caught and wouldn't slip thru the rings. Other trick is to have anchor farther out than you think is needed. No matter what take a Handled VHF radio to the tent.
    Last edited by alaskapiranha; 04-27-2008 at 15:10.

  5. #5
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    Default 220swift

    here is a system that I have used for years I live on p.o.w. I use a 30 pound lead with a plastic troll block attached to it, I run a rope thru it and it is fastened too the bow of the boat the lead is dropped where you want to anchor the boat the free end of the line is played out as you ease your boat into the beach being careful not to foul it in the outboard prop you must have enough rope for the boat and the free end to reach the beach unload your gear and pull the free end of the rope this will pull the boat out to the anchor in this case the lead, make the free end fast to somthing solid. to retrieve the boat pull on the rope it will pull up snug and create a little lift you will than retrieve boat and anchor/lead at the same time. a little common sense needs to be applied when using this system avoid places where there is or might be a onshore wind or ground swell pick a protected beach with a slope, and always tie your boat up rock solid before leaving it. keep in mind that rocky pass can have a lot of current around the elbow.

  6. #6
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    Default

    Tide books are easy enough to get and carry
    i do not think they have very large tide differentials down there. so it makes it easier to anchor out.
    what i do is; in a spot with steeper drop off i tie line 10-15 feet ( ESTIMATED WATER DEPTH AS FAR AS YOU CAN PUSH BOAT OUT) up from anchor on to bow. coil some of rope adjacent to knot but from long side of rope on bow ( inflatable tube is what i have could be tougher in aluminum skiff) and place anchor on that coil......HOLDING!!!!!! long end of rope push boat out as far as you can as it stops; pull on rope, anchor drops in water. i do this mainly to try and keep boat away from bears that might wander by and decide to bite my inflatable.
    now i have spent 5 hrs ( midnight to 5 am) cold waiting in rain for tide to go out as i thought tide was going out when we tied off and partner tied rope (where i told him) to rock that went under at high tide........extra high tide.....full moon my fault for not checking tide book usually not a factor as i tie well above high tide line.
    i have always been able to pull boat and anchor in but if anchor hangs up you have another problem. rocks tied in small bag as anchor may work best pretty low tech but has worked well .....in shallow spots where tide goes out hundreds of feet it will not work.
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
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  7. #7

    Default Here what happens

    Here's what happens when you miss a fact or two, Was 500 yards from shore and 100 yards from ocean. Opps so even years of knowlage can be a waste. But clams for dinner.
    Last edited by alaskapiranha; 04-27-2008 at 15:10.

  8. #8
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskapiranha View Post
    Here's what happens when you miss a fact or two, Was 500 yards from shore and 100 yards from ocean. Opps so even years of knowlage can be a waste. But clams for dinner.
    Thats some nice parking in the tidal pool!

  9. #9
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    Default

    Well, Rocky Pass is true to its name. Bring a spare prop or three. There is a lot of current in the elbow, I was just there a couple weeks ago transiting Rocky Pass. I don't have advice for your anchoring dilemna. I don't think a cannon ball will hold, but AK Nimrod's technique should, as long as the anchor holds well on your first try.

    How big of a boat are you going to use?

  10. #10
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Lightbulb muck anchor

    Aknimrod has it right.Tie the anchor to the boat with enough line to reach bottom +50%of that length. Then tie your long beach line from the boat to the (HEAD) OF THE ANCHOR USING A FIGURE 8 TYPE HALF HITCH NOT THE NORMAL SHACKLE SPOT. So you can pull the anchor out. Make this the same length as the first tie off line. then coil the remaining beach line that is tied to the head of the anchor and hold it in your hand. Set the anchor loosley on the bow with the two anchor tie off lines coiled nice and loose as not to tangle and lay them under the anchor.
    Have your partners push out on the skiff as hard as they can and uncoil the beach rope as needed. When the boat drifts as far out as it will go give a yank on the beachline in your hand and and the anchor should drop. Be sure to tie off the beachline securely to a stout tree or stump above the tideline. The deeper the incline on the beach the better this works.

    If its low tide just put the skiff there and put the anchor in the ground by hand.

    2 ropes one goes from boat to anchor.
    The other long one goes from the boat to the anchor head then is tied to the tideline. If you tie the long beachline to the normal shackle pont on the anchor youl never get it loose cuz youll be setting the anchor when you pull on it. I had to swim to the boat in december cuz of this one time. After a try or two youll get this figured out.

    You probly wont see really huge tides but the current is probly pretty strong in there. ALso I like to park in a creekmouth if possible so the boat floats sooner.
    Last edited by Magnum Man; 03-08-2008 at 14:44. Reason: typo

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK NIMROD View Post
    i do not think they have very large tide differentials down there. so it makes it easier to anchor out.
    Not quite Cook Inlet, or the Bay of Fundy, but right now there's a 17ft tide swing between high and low, and that's plenty.

    http://www.tides.info/?command=view&...Kake%2C+Alaska

  12. #12

    Default

    Taken in Peril Straight, about 80 miles from Devils Elbow...

    high tide...



    low tide...



    I used the Anchor Buddy bugee cord to keep the boat in the water. It works, it's simple, and it will never hang up due to rocks or tangled lines.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskapiranha View Post
    Opps so even years of knowlage can be a waste. But clams for dinner.
    Do it enough times, and the odds are bound to catch up. Here are 2 times things have gone wrong...




  14. #14
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Talking aargh

    Nice pics. Your giving me cabin fever. It sure seems like its been a long winter here in juneau. Just gotta wait 1 more month for the ice to thaw to start building my cabin up the taku river! Got any more info about the anchor bungee??
    Last edited by Magnum Man; 03-08-2008 at 15:40. Reason: quistion

  15. #15

    Thumbs up 10-4 on the bungee

    bungee system works great.
    get yourself about 150'-200' of 5/8 bungee cord its amazingly strong and will stretch about 75%. Lash or double tie the knots as it has a tendincy to stretch untied.
    Tie the bungee to the anchor drop the anchor in deep water motor to shore paying out the bungee. Tie a long tag line onto the skiff pull in the slack on the bungee and stretch it tight. Tie it off to the skiff and let the stretch boing the skiff into deep water as you pay out the tag line. Tie the tag line off to a big tree or rock above the tide line. If you anchor at half tide on a flood make sure you have enough stretch in the bungee to pull the skiff into the higher tide level

  16. #16
    Member Border Justice's Avatar
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    Default Awesome Photos

    Just seeing those photos gets me goin! I can barely work these days thinkin about the upcoming trip to Kuiu!

  17. #17
    Member muskeg's Avatar
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    Default

    Just hunt the incoming tide and you won't have to worry about it.

  18. #18
    Member muskeg's Avatar
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    Default keep it simple

    You don't have to get tec with a 14 foot lund ... I just use a small Mushroom Anchor (10lbs / 12 lbs)



    .... have a 200 foot or so bow line. Secure the Anchor abut 10 to 20 feet from the bow end (depending on water depth) of the line .... place the Anchor on the bow ... give it a good shove ... when the skiff is in the desired place (work the wind) give the line a jerk ... then tie the line off on the beach.

    The Mushroom Anchor has rarely hung up on me ....

    Around here we call that an Indian Anchor !!!!

  19. #19
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    Default

    alaskapiranha- that isn't a bay off unakwick is it looks like what i did twice in one season 14-15 years ago. once ended up in stream and other time woke up 100 yards from water and 500-600 from high tide line....water was back in by time breakfast was done
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
    MASTER BOWHUNTER EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR; MEMBER UNITED BLOOD TRACKERS; POPE & YOUNG MEASURER

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