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Thread: What gear to bring for a 2 month visit?

  1. #1

    Default What gear to bring for a 2 month visit?

    Hi guys,

    This is such a newbie question some of you might want to vomit.

    Im going to be in Anchorage from june 1st until august 1st. I will fish every weekend, most of the time from shore for salmon. (maybe trout but if I do, Ill buy some gear at one of the local stores).

    I want to know, what type of rod and reel should I bring?
    Im really a spinfishing guy. Like a fool, I never learnt to fly fish...
    At this moment, I have nothing. Nada. I sold all my gear about 3 weeks ago when I moved from Vancouver to California. Now, I get to buy new gear with the money from the old gear. Its not much, but it'll get me a decent rod and reel
    Also, is mono more popular than braided? Whats your personal preference?
    What pound test etc?

    Is there anything that I should buy before flying in? Anything that would save me some money or is fishing gear pretty much the same price in Anchorage.

    Last question, any suggestions for weekend trips from Anchorage? Just for a drive to in the morning, and a drive back in the evening for salmon, or big trout?

    Thanks dudes. Anxious to be there.

  2. #2
    Member
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    Default Keeping track of stuff...

    You'll get lots of advice, both from the locals and from the guidebooks. As you wind around during your two month foray, you'll identify things based on streamside participation.
    (i.e. "wow, I need to get some more leader material and I'm running low on swivels")

    Trying to remember all that stuff once you make it back to a tackle shop is a nightmare once you hit the asiles. They'll be so many dangling distractions you might miss buying what you need, and then buy stuff you don't need.

    So what's my point?

    Carry a tiny notebook and pen with you at all times and put it in your fishing vest. Write down things you will need and then trust your notes. This inexpensive tip might save you many dollars during your trip...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

  3. #3
    Member monello's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sodabiscuit12345 View Post
    ?
    Is there anything that I should buy before flying in?
    Waders. Or at least hip boots.

  4. #4
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Thumbs up yep..

    Buy this book if you don't do anything else.

    http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/sto...196ed60f0fd5ba

    Forget that it says "flyfishing" on it. It has maps and driving directions to more places than you will have time to visit. Tons of insights. The book is divided into chapters. Each area of Alaska has a chapter. The one on Mat-Su Valley and Kenai Penninsula will be of great benefit to you for sure. A must read. If you are willing to hike a bit, you should be able to find some great fishing spots without any company. It would be good to take a few guided trips as well. Check out Troutfitters store on the Kenai. Near Cooper Landing if I am not mistaken. Heard lots about them. They have a nice shop and also have a guide service. Some walk in stuff would be cool, but take a trip on the Kenai or Kasilof for kings. The timing of your stay will be during the king run. Take advantage of it with at least one boat trip. I used Jimmie Jack out of Soldotna. Great trip to be had with him. Easy to find on Google if you are interested. About $200/full day for kings out of his powerboats. A drift boat on the Kasilof is on my to do list. Take a one day halibut trip out of Seward/Homer. Tons of people to take you out. About $200/full day for that as well. You are heading to a fishing mecca. Get ready.

    For lures, go ahead and get familiar with Blue Fox vibrax spinners. Great spinners. Also, pixies, kwikfish, and Bay de Noc Swedish pimples. You could load a box full of these and catch fish for two months for sure. Be sure to get some 1/4 ounce spinners for the dollies/grayling. For salmon, look towards 3/8 and 1/2 ounce spinners/pixies. Orange, pink, and chartreuse would be a good place to start. The book "Alaska Fishing" will tell you more than you would need to know.

    For rods/reels, Look at a 7ft two piece rod with spinning reel. Lamiglass is popular in Alaska. I have never used one, but many swear by them. I like my 4 piece Cabelas XML travel spinning rods. Take a look at them if you want something easy to travel with. I fly fish, but my wife has used them for dollies in NW Alaska (10 lb+ dollies), chum in Nome, and 10-15 lbs silvers on a recent SW float trip on the Goodnews. These rods rock. We bought the 7 foot medium ones and use them with 14 lb mono. I can't recommend them high enough. They come in a travel tube and are of the highest quality. And Cabelas will replace them if they break. No questions asked. You have to love Cabelas. This rod would be a great choice if you want one rod to do it all. If you can get two rods, a larger rod for salmon would be of use. I would not want to try to pull in a fish bigger than about 20 lbs on the XML rods. I recently got some Daiwa SS Tournament reels that are incredible. You may consider a medium/heavy 7-8 foot rod with 20 lb line for salmon and a 6-6.5 ft rod with 10 lb line for dollies/bows. That may be the best set up. It would be hard to have one rod do it all unless you were fishing only for salmon. Another great book (on the forum store as well) is "Alaska Fishing" by Rene Liemeres and Gunnar Pederson. It has spinning specific info in it. But the other book has all the maps and directions you need to find specific spots to fish. Gunnar also has a book, "Fishing Alaska by Road" or similar on the forum store. It may be worth getting as well. I would get a few of these books before buying any rods/reels. And as far as prices in Anchorage, they are about the same as anywhere else from what I have seen. Go to Sportsmans Warehouse in Anchorage. It is a huge outdoors store. Be sure to check out Wal Mart as well. They have better stuff than the average Wal Mart. After all, you are in Alaska. You should have a great summer ahead of you. Get a few books and read up on things and you should get even more out of your time in the great land.

    Be sure to get a good pair of breathable waders. NO neoprene. Cabelas has some good deals on waders. Look in their "bargain cave".

    Buy the most expensive hooks/swivels/line you can find!
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  5. #5
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Thumbs up rod/reel idea...

    Below is a link to the rod/reel set up I mentioned earlier. Top notch stuff.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...l&N=4887&Nty=1

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...=cat20333&rid=
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  6. #6
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    Default

    A good digital Camera

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 2PawsRiver View Post
    A good digital Camera
    Check!
    I need a good camera for work, so Ive been doing some photography for the past 2 years.
    If I cant get the right rod and reel Im gonna toss my canon at the fish and hopefully knock one out.

  8. #8
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    Default Don't forget...

    wasabi
    pickled ginger
    soy sauce
    chop sticks...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

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