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Thread: Help getting started

  1. #1
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    Default Help getting started

    I want to get started into bowhunting and archery and am looking for any advise that can be given concerning choosing the right bow, accessaries, and arrows. I found what seems to be a decent web site (www.huntersfriend.com) that gives guidance on how to choose a bow based on ISO speed, axle-to-axle length, brace height, draw weight, draw length and let off. What should I be looking for and should I choose a bow based on speed or forgiveness? Also, are "Ready to Hunt" bows a good choice? I know there are a lot of questions here, but any help in getting started would be appreciated.

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    Member daveak21's Avatar
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    I'm pretty new to archery as well. I found archerytalk.com to be very informative. Check it out. Lots of great information.

    Dave

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Take a look at this link on compound bow selection.

    Paul from The Archer's Den directed me to do some reading at that link before shopping, and it helped tremendously. I'm still struggling with which bow to pick, but at least I know what I'm looking at.

  4. #4

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    first two things is set the predijuce's aside, and second, figure out how much you have to spend. Consider it an investment, or in my case I have many investments lol. Seriously, once you find the right bow you'll likely not buy one for a long time to come. Bows today have become like automobiles. Most are pretty comparable in most departments. Finding the one you like (ford chevy toyota etc) is going to be up to you going out and shooting some. Finding guys who have them and "test driving a few" if you will. While I may like brunettes you may like blondes and the guy over there is nutz about readheads....hopefully that's clear as mud.

    Lastly shop around. While the new hotrod on the market is nice. I wouldnt bat an eye at my buddies old pse fireflight from god knows how long ago now. THat thing is a real shooter and if you can find one now it's cheap. My point is, the bows that have been around the block (and hopefully not abused in the process) are very good investments unto themselves.

    Good luck.

    ps another site, www.bowsite.com The rest mentioned that I've been on are good ones also, as is www.hunting.net

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    Thumbs up Thanks

    Thanks for everyone's help.

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    Member akjeff's Avatar
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    Default Pro Shop

    My recomendation is to go to a pro shop. My family goes to Fletchers in Wasilla. Top notch service and extremely friendly. No pressure either. I hear great things about Archers Den in Eagle River. I just don't have any personal experience with them. The big box may or may not be able to give you the expert advice you will get at Fletchers or Archers Den. It is well worth the drive if you don't live in the Valley or Eagle River.

  7. #7

    Default Choices

    Archery equipment today is like care or anything else computer designed and manufactured. Very consistent and repeatable.
    Before you buy a bow and equipment go to several shops and shoot some different equipment. DON"T buy a bow strictly because of arrow speed, it's like having a magnum rifle if you can't be consistant with it, a fast miss is still a miss.
    Bows that are longer axle to axle are more forgiving, but may not be the optimum hunting bow. But long bows (6 feet or so) still work as hunting weapons.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  8. #8

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    longbows are optimum close range hunting weapons.

    Simple, light, you can get takedowns if you like, easy to shoot, easy to set up, and quick. A caribou, moose, sheep, etc doesnt care if it was kilt with an arrow moving at mach 23 vs one moving as fast as grandmas grocery getter. The buisness is just the same, a close range hunting tool that does it's job well.................in the right hands

    The hole thing about brush bows be it having wheels or a stickbow is complete hogwash. You'll understand that someday down the road. Chasing hares in the confines of alder thickets with a 68" bow takes some getting used to but by no means is it hard, uncumbersome or gaingly. Now the guy shooting it....well....thats another topic

  9. #9
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Default Pro shop

    Best advice on this thread! go down to the pro shop, whichever's closer to you. I use Fletcher's once in a while, cause its close. The two critical things the folks there can show you are your draw length and power (how many pounds pull you're comfortable with). Without knowing those two things, its impossible to choose the right bow for you. Put your ego aside when considering your draw weight- all you need is 40# or better for big game in Alaska. Its more important to be able to draw your bow comfortably and consistently. You'll also need to decide between finger release or mechanical, and compound vs traditional bow. Trust me- the time it takes to drive down to a pro shop is well well worth it. Don't feel like you have to buy a bow right away either. None of the folks I've ever talked to ever gave me the feeling that I had to walk out of their shop with one of their bows; I think thats a great sign of a quality shop.

  10. #10
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    Don't feel like you have to buy a bow right away either. None of the folks I've ever talked to ever gave me the feeling that I had to walk out of their shop with one of their bows; I think thats a great sign of a quality shop.
    Good advice. I've been shooting bows 1-2 times per week at the Archer's Den for close to a month now, and I'm still not done with the shopping process. I've finally got it narrowed down to a few, but not 100% certain yet. Shops that encourage you to shoot bows until you find the one you want are the kind to support.

  11. #11
    Member akjeff's Avatar
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    Default Pro shop

    Here is a story about why you should use a pro shop.

    Yesterday the family and I were at Fletchers. A coworker from my wife's work, who we talked into meeting us there (she was very timid about shooting her new bow which she had ordered awhile back). She had a lesson scheduled for the next day, but my wife convinced her to try her bow before her lesson. Good thing she did. The bow came from the factory with the wrong limbs, for her. Now this is not a very poplular bow it is a Mathews Ignition left handed. She needed 20# limbs and the bow arrived with 40#. Scott at Fletchers came up with some right handed limbs worked his magic and got them set for left (the Ignition has the Mathews string suppressors on the limbs) and off she was shooting. A temporary fix until the correct limbs come in, camo limbs don't match her purple bow. The customer service there is outstanding.

    To add emphasis Scott also worked a little magic and took an extra inch out of the draw length on a new used bow of mine.

  12. #12
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    don't get set up with a bow of too high of poundage some folks think you need high poundage and there are advantages but 60# ....even 50# will kill anything in North America. if the bow is too heavy of draw wt. you will struggle to shoot it and could have too much movement and accuracy can suffer. i shoot both compounds #60 and recurves#57 , i prefer recurve . there are + / - with each. recurve or long bow will require more practice. if you decide to get a compound then you need to decide if you want to use release or shoot fingers . bow should be longer axle to axle if shooting fingers.
    scott at fletchers and paul at archers den are great and very helpful take a day of w/e and come to big city and try some bows. i know there are pro shops in fbnks as well but not familiar with any of them....i knowthat would be closer for you....go visit all of them there see what you like . customer service is a big plus when you find one you like.
    good luck
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
    MASTER BOWHUNTER EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR; MEMBER UNITED BLOOD TRACKERS; POPE & YOUNG MEASURER

  13. #13
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    Default Thanks

    I will continue to go to a pro shop. I have gone to Sportsman's in Fairbanks and Anchorage and have tested a few of the bows. WOW!!! It is so addicting and fun. I think I am going to like this. Thanks for all your suggestions and if there are anymore out ther please keep them comming. I am realizing that there is a lot of stuff that goes into choosing the right bow and accessories.

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