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Thread: Neck sizing for single-shot rifles

  1. #1
    Member Mort's Avatar
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    Question Neck sizing for single-shot rifles

    I've recently bought a single-shot rifle (T/C Encore Pro Hunter) and am considering another (Ruger #1). As I ponder reloading for two new calibers, I wonder about neck sizing vs full-length for this type rifle.

    Can someone guide me? In both cases, these are the only rifles I have in their respective calibers, and the only ones I anticipate owning in the near future.

    Thanks for your thoughts,

    Chris

  2. #2
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    Default

    I have loaded for a variety of S/S rifles and pistols. With the falling block type such as the No. 1, Dakota #10 and the Miller usually neck sizing works well. Rarely does the body need sized down but some times the shoulder needs to be bumped back. With the Contender style hinged frame it seems to depend on the type of case, rimmed, or rimless but they usually get the shoulder bumped every time. I don't F/L resize just neck size then bump the shoulder back. I have generally used calibers that were max at about 45,000 psi in the contender and similar and body sizing isn't necessary usually with that pressure level.

    If with any of these you use a cartridge which operates in the 60,000 psi range, they will usually need to be full length sized or sized in the body die. I like the body die because if the case isn't expanded at the body, it won't touch the body die walls just the shoulder and bump it back.

    For all hinge frame singles or doubles or any falling block with rimmed cases at about 45,000 psi or less, you can probably just neck size and never have a problem.

    For some reason I think the No. 1's are best suited for rimmed or older rimless calibers such as 7x57, 30-40 Krag, 450/400 N.E., 9.3x74, 38-55, 40-70 Sharps straight (custom No.3's) and in these straight cases I partially size and work the brass as little as possible.

    What calibers are you loading in these guns?
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  3. #3

    Default Contender sizing

    When I was really into Contenders a little while back, I learned something from sizing .30 and .357 herrett that pertains, I think, to other cartridges. To get any life out of the Herrets, both rimmed cases based on the .30-30, you had to initially size them down a little at a time until the barrel just closed on the action with a case inserted to get proper sizing to prevent losing cases from head separation. I later learned about initially sizing cases in the Contender with the extractor removed so you could actually get an honest "reading." I think Murphy is right about the #1 being best with rimmed cases on the pseudo Farquaharson(sp) action. I also think the Contender works best with them also, despite being a breaking action rather then a falling block. What he says about the little shoulder bump is right on too.

  4. #4
    Member Mort's Avatar
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    Default Thanks, but...

    I appreciate the help, but I'm ignorant enough that I need more!

    The T/C is in .338 Federal. The Ruger No. 1 I'm pondering is .375 Ruger. Anything specific you can offer to those two combos is welcome.

    When you mention "bumping back the shoulder," what exactly do you mean? Is that a particular way of adjusting the depth of the sizing die? Is there a technique for setting the die like there normally is for a FL sizer setting?

    Thanks,

    Chris

  5. #5
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    Default Bumping back the solder

    When FL dies are adjusted correctly they size the base and adjust the shoulder to give proper headspace. With neck sizing the body doesn't get sized but you can adjust the die to set the sholder back just a bit or "bump". For may T/C esp. in 357 Herret I align the cases in the chamber the same every shot and size them just enought where I can close the gun. For hunting I'll size them where they close easily and give up some case life.

    Single shot actions other than the falling block with the block supported at the top tend to spring open a bit when fired. Since the action is pivoted at the bottom the springing or openning will be a slight but more at the top and the base of the case can end up slightly non-perpendicular to the axis of the case. This effect is obvious in the Remington rolling block design if you ever load for one of those.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mort View Post
    I appreciate the help, but I'm ignorant enough that I need more!

    When you mention "bumping back the shoulder," what exactly do you mean? Is that a particular way of adjusting the depth of the sizing die? Is there a technique for setting the die like there normally is for a FL sizer setting?

    Thanks,

    Chris

  6. #6
    Member Mort's Avatar
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    OK, think I got it. Thanks all for the help. THink I'll probably be OK with neck sizing, unless/until I move into repeaters for one or more of these calibers.

    Chris

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