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Thread: blk bear on salmon how to?

  1. #1

    Default blk bear on salmon how to?

    I have never hunted black bear on a salmon stream. Say I start hunting where the (small) stream dumps into the salt and start working my way upstream. What should I expect? How far up do salmon go? How far upstream are the bears? Just slowly still hunt or sit and watch big stretches of stream? Would it be better to hike farther upstream to possibly hunt bears (bigger bears) that others would have not gotten to? Thanks.

  2. #2

    Default

    Loiusiana--your question is hard to answer because of all the variables that go into hunting bears over salmon streams. For example, some of the salmon streams continue on for quite a distance and the fish spawn quite a distance upstream while others are impassable for the salmon after 100-200 meters—although that can even change from year to year based upon water levels and unexpected obstructions in the river (trees blown down, rock-slides, etc.). It also depends on the time of year on whether the bears will be mainly focusing on the salmon streams or more inclined to focus on berries and just occasionally moving thru the area. To get more information on these general trends in a specific area you are going to hunt talk to the fish and game biologists and others who have hunted that area—even campers/hikers in the area can help you identify where and when the bears are around the salmon streams.

    For a general approach and what has worked for me in the past is to hunt the tidal flats near the salmon stream when the tide is out—if this coincides with dawn or dusk it usually is even better or foggy, rainy, overcast weather. The bears will be checking the pools of water to see if salmon are stranded until the next high tide. In general you want to limit your movement in order to limit your scent trail. Find a good spot overlooking a stretch of river or tidal flat and glass for bears—try to do this toward evening.

    If you are walking up the river you should be able to identify favorite “dining spots” where the bears have flattened all the vegetation and left salmon scraps everywhere—try to find these and then back away and set up downwind of where you think the bears will approach these spots and wait them out (usually towards nightfall). I would try to avoid spreading your scent around too much as a general rule although in some areas it appears as if the bears don’t care much—they are so focused on the salmon and have their routine established and are hard to break from that habit—although a well-placed bullet usually does the trick...

    Also, don’t be too concerned over making low level noise if you are walking upstream in the riverbed—with salmon splashing all around the bears expect that type of noise and most rivers are noisy enough to mask your added noise anyway—do avoid making unnatural noises such as metal-on-metal, coughing, talking.
    Walk slowly and stop frequently to search for bears coming to the river. Scent and motion will scare them easier than some small “natural” noises in my opinion when you are hunting black bears in the heavy vegetation along the coast.
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  3. #3

    Default black bear

    louisiana, if you are hunting in southeast were I am you would first make sure the wind is blowing right. Late afternoons are better usually for this. I would start your hunt September first when the season opens up. Weather can be a factor on fall hunts and the later the worse most years.Most salmon in the steams are going to be pinks , these salmon spawn from the intertidal areas up to three miles up most streams. In southeast obstuctions usually limit there spawning area.slowing walk up the stream and if you see a area were bears have been feeding stop and watch.Bears usually grab a fish and eat it in the woods near by so you don't want to be in a hurry.
    Jim

  4. #4
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default

    In PWS I have seen places were the bears return to feed. These areas are easy to ID from all the tracks and half eaten salmon. With the right wind you could stand hunt these spots like you would a deer stand. I have found many spots like this on the Whittier side. Remember you can get away with a lot but the wind has to be right. A small ground blind might be just the ticket.

    Steve

  5. #5
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Its easy my friend

    Don't stress it much really........Enjoy being out there with all that life. Its only a matter of time before the bears start popping. Its just amazing being on a salmon stream in SE AK!

    Shooting the bear is the easy part.....being able to relax and take it all in.......thats the hard part.

  6. #6
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Talking Its easy my friend

    This is a Fall Kuiu Bear.......with the pistol.
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  7. #7
    Member KRS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    This is a Fall Kuiu Bear.......with the pistol.
    Nice bear, nice picture!

    KRS

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