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Thread: what to expect?

  1. #1
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    Default what to expect?

    Hi all, I have been reading this site for about a month now trying to get an idea of what to expect but I figured it was time to ask for myself now. I am from florida and will be coming up for the summer to do ALOT of fishing. I run a 30 ft. mako down here in the gulf of mexico, and a friend has a 30 ft. boat up there in Homer that I will have use of so the boat isnt an issue. Handeling of the boat is what concerns me. Our tides are only 2 - 4 ft. and a bad day for us is 6 - 10 ft. seas. I see that tides can vary as much as 20 ft. Thats something I'll definately have to watch out for. Guessing large seas and rip currents are normal there. being new to your water I will definately not venture out by myself for a while, but I would like to get an idea of what to expect before hand. Appreciate any input you may have.

  2. #2
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Good that you have boating experince.. I would go with some one that has been out on these waters before.. It won't take long to learn that the weather/water can change in a heart beat. Rip tides, strong currents, huge tide changes. These are someo fthe things you will in counter. You are doing the first thing right in talking to people that have been out on the water here. I have contact the cost guard and other boaters and asked like in Homer where are the danger spots for boating IE rip tides ETC...
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  3. #3

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    Asking for info is a good indicator you'll do ok here, it shows your intelligent. Here is my two cents; Big tides can bring things into the water, like trees or "deadhead" logs, watch were your going at all times. Kelp in Homer can be everywhere on a some days, pain in the butt to drive in. If you see a wind sock blowing straight out on the Homer spit don't go out in your boat, white caps -no go. Clear sunny day in Seward can mean for rough water around 2:00 in the afternoon -this is consistent, get out and back early. Rain is a good thing in Seward sometimes. Don't count on many anchoring locations out of Seward, its a fjord with step walls of rock in many of the popular fishing locals. Whittier will be raining more times than not. Flys in windless coves in the later part of the summer out of Whittier can be exciting. PWS cruising guide is a must-have book for Prince William Sound...To much more to mention obviously, this is Alaska, hopefully more will chime in here. Good luck!

  4. #4
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myers View Post
    Asking for info is a good indicator you'll do ok here, it shows your intelligent. Here is my two cents; Big tides can bring things into the water, like trees or "deadhead" logs, watch were your going at all times. Kelp in Homer can be everywhere on a some days, pain in the butt to drive in. If you see a wind sock blowing straight out on the Homer spit don't go out in your boat, white caps -no go. Clear sunny day in Seward can mean for rough water around 2:00 in the afternoon -this is consistent, get out and back early. Rain is a good thing in Seward sometimes. Don't count on many anchoring locations out of Seward, its a fjord with step walls of rock in many of the popular fishing locals. Whittier will be raining more times than not. Flys in windless coves in the later part of the summer out of Whittier can be exciting. PWS cruising guide is a must-have book for Prince William Sound...To much more to mention obviously, this is Alaska, hopefully more will chime in here. Good luck!
    Myers is right on!!!! Another thing is if bad weather hits Seward you can almost count in two days that storm will hit whitter. After storm I have seen allot of logs floating along with kelp in a differnt area. Another this is Whitter has allot of rocks. Get a good map/gps computer chart to show you where the rocks are. There are still some rocks that are not on the maps.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  5. #5
    Member bhollis's Avatar
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    Although the tidal ranges in AK are very large, they aren't particularly difficult to deal with. Strong currents generally only become a problem in narrow passages, etc., and you just need to be aware of where they are and what the tide and current are doing. As for making sure you always have enough water under the keel, make sure you've got appropriate charts showing the depth (at low water) in the areas you're operating--and keep a close watch on the depth sounder.

    The other areas where tides are important are mooring and anchoring. In my experience, most docks in AK are of the floating variety, and mooring to a floating dock is really a non-issue. But be aware, if you tie up to a fixed dock, you'll need to take the tide change into account in how you tie up your boat. Similarly, you need to take the tide change into account when anchoring. First, by making sure you'll still have adequate water under you at low tide, and second by computing your scope based upon the water depth at high tide.

    The other big issue in AK is weather. And that's a whole other subject . . .

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