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Thread: fishing for grayling

  1. #1
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    Default fishing for grayling

    what works best for grayling? ive caught a few on flies any help would be appreciated

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    For flies Elk hair caddis drys, nymphs and bead heads for wets.
    Silver or gold blue fox spinners in sizes 1-3 and 1-1 1/2" spoons with my most productive being the smallest 1/5 ounce Lucky Strike Halfwave & a tiny Len Thompson in dark orange with black spots and gold back (we call it a potato bug)

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    If you fly fish then any dry fly will work. I have even had them bite my indacator. If you like spinning rods or have a kid/friend who does not fly fish, give them a light rod and reel with a 0 mepps tied on. My favorite is an olive green body and a silver blade.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

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    I find early in the season elk hair caddis work great, then later they seem to start bottom feeding more, and small weighted egg sucking leaches work well then.

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trout-fisher18 View Post
    what works best for grayling? ive caught a few on flies any help would be appreciated
    Dry flies, streamers and nymphs.

    elk hair caddis

    egg sucking leech

    zug bug beaded or not.


    these are my favorite for grayliing.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    0 mepps and, and o mepps thunderbugs. On the fly I like to use a beadhead nymph. Then again just about anything you throw at them usually can get them to strike. Fun fish and love chasing them.
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    stimulators, elk hair caddis, adams, wulfs, humpies, basically any attractor pattern that floats. Also wet flies like partridge and orange, peacock and partridge, Black gnats, leadwing and royal coachmen.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    ok thanks for the tips, im going to hike up to lower fuller lake at the end of may. i will try some fly fishing and try some of the little spinners. thanks again

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    Suprised nobody mentioned the ol' stand-by : golden-ribbed hairs ear nymph. Works fished either top, middle, or bottom. If I had to head into the Bush with only one fly, that'd be the one I'd pick. If given two choices, the other would be a tan colored Elk Wing Caddis.

    As for spinners, don't overlook the panther martin's; they love the black body w/gold spinner blade.

    My favorite all time Grayling spinner is a copper colored #0 Vibrax.

  10. #10
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    Mepps #2 - A grayling has no problem taking a spinner this big and they are much easier to release with the larger spinner as they are normally hooked in the mouth. They can get the smaller ones a lot farther down the throat and they are hard to get out without hurting the fish.

  11. #11
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rambling raven View Post
    Mepps #2 - A grayling has no problem taking a spinner this big and they are much easier to release with the larger spinner as they are normally hooked in the mouth. They can get the smaller ones a lot farther down the throat and they are hard to get out without hurting the fish.

    Exactly, that's why my go to spinners are silver or gold #2 & #3 blue fox spinners. Grayling are pretty delicate fish and they take smaller spinners deep requiring too much time to remove and injuring the fish.
    They need to be carefully released also I have had them slip out of my hand before they are completely ready swim off a few feet and roll upside down stunned.
    It is best if you can just grab the hook with pliers while they are still in the water and twist the hook out. This is much easier to do with the larger size spinners.
    The hardest thing I have found fishing for these guys is getting a decent picture. I now take most of my pictures of grayling in the water.


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    Default Streamside delight...

    You can usually count on these guys to wolf down anything. Bring fire and imagination and then you wolf them down. This is the fish-on-the-stick that hangs over your tiny campfire.
    Grab some of those tartar sauce packets from your favorite take-out spot and you are in business.

    I wail these fish on ultra-light spin with a quarter ounce spoon...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

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