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Thread: 30/06 and 200 grain barnes tsx

  1. #1
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    Default 30/06 and 200 grain barnes tsx

    Does anyone have any experince with the 200 grain barnes tsx in a 30/06? What velocity do they need to expand?

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    yukon, can't help you out just yet maybe in the next couple of months. Have 2 boxes of them and when it was really sub-zero a few weeks back I was pretty house bored and figured out my overall length in my FN 98 .30-338 with them and loaded them at various charges with N560 and Fed 215 GM's. Got them to print pretty good, but I do have a consistant "flyer" every 3 shots. Trigger pull is set at a clean 3#'s and rifle is bedded and use the Caldwell Lead Sled.

    I have not changed primers yet to verify any changes in my reloads and when I do I strongly suspect this bullet to be an excellent performer for both Moose and Grizzlies. The deal with any Barnes is that the comparison rate is like one bullet weight class from the norm ie... .30cal 180TSX down to a 168 TSX, this would give an expansion rate acceptable for what you shoot with the .30-06 class bullets.

    I have killed grizzlies with the 180 Barnes with a .300 win mag and they exhibit excellent capabilities for knockdown and full penetration from shoulder to shoulder. I did have one particular large grizz that would not go down until about a half mile or so when I busted one shoulder and exited behind the off shoulder-lots of lung,tissue and hair on the gravel bar. After that encounter I bought a .375 RUM and still preferred the Barnes...used the 270's with fantastic results!

    Barnes is an excellent bullet with great accuracies and knockdown ..... with the right bullet weight of course. They can just "pencil" thru with to slow of speed.

    oh well, just another rambling moment.

    regards,

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    That's one thing I like about the Barnes bullets. They tend to paper-punch when shooting thin-skinned small animals like PWS blacktails, but expand and have great knock-down when the same round is used for bigger stuff like moose. When your game only has 30 pounds of meat to eat, you surely don't want to waste any to a large wound channel.

    Brian

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    I only used them in the 300 win mag. I shot some sitka blacktails and found the bullets opened quickly. They would put a nice quarter sized hole thorough and out. They would open within a couple inches.
    I was shooting poorly and shot through both front shoulders of one deer and through the femur of another. I only lost a couple pounds of meat from each one.
    What I love about x bullets is that they dont bloodshot meat. I only lost a little meat around the quarter sized hole to get the bone shards out. Similar shots with lead bullets would have made a huge bloody mess and I would have lost much more meat.

    I have loaded some 200 TSX's for my 30-06 but have not hunted with it yet. my fastest load is 2500 fps. All the 200 TSX loads that I have tried are near identical matches to the same velocity that I get with the 220 partition.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    I've got some experience with the TSX's, but not the particular one you're asking about.

    Personally, I would choose a lighter TSX than the 200gr, for use in the .30-06. I've always been told the idea of the X-Bullet was to have a light bullet at high velocity, that retains nearly 100% of it's weight and still penetrates deeply, due to bullet design rather than initial weight.

    I run a 270gr in my .375 H&H. I am currently working up loads with 120 and 140gr TSX's in my .280AI, and I plan to use the 210gr version in my .338 Ultra.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tananaBrian View Post
    That's one thing I like about the Barnes bullets. They tend to paper-punch when shooting thin-skinned small animals like PWS blacktails, but expand and have great knock-down when the same round is used for bigger stuff like moose. When your game only has 30 pounds of meat to eat, you surely don't want to waste any to a large wound channel.

    Brian
    I seen a sitka blacktail doe take a shot in the neck from a 200-grain TSX bullet fired from a 300 win. mag. Soft-ball size exit wound out the back of the neck with just some hair holding the head on the body. Like 6 inches of spine was vaporized.

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    I haven't used a 200 gr .30 cal., but in my experience with Barnes on game to the size of Elk and some media testing (bal. gel) show that optimal expansion is 2300 fps and above. There was fair expansion in media at 2200, but not full like 2300 and above. There was very little expansion below 2000 fps. For me personally, I prefer to keep the terminal velocity above 2250, on .375 cal. and lower.

    Dave

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    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
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    Thumbs down 3006

    For the 30-06 and TSX I would suggest no heavier than the 180 TSX.......heavier will just hurt the performance of the 3006.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaska bush man View Post
    For the 30-06 and TSX I would suggest no heavier than the 180 TSX.......heavier will just hurt the performance of the 3006.
    I agree with the above statement and would even suggest going down to teh 168 or 165TSX. FWIW In the cases where folks have claimed that they had bullet failures with TSX bullets is in lower velocity expansion and to me there is no plus on penciling a 200 grain TSX through an animal as opposed to getting equal penetration with good expansion with a smaller for cal TSX bullet. I put a 165TSX through a moose this winter and it is probably still flying teh way it passed through it and cant possibly imagine the benefit of the heavier slower less flat shooting 200TSX. JMO

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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Yup, a 165-grain TSX sounds about perfect for the 30-06.

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    Default trajectory

    thanks guys, i tried the 200 in my 30/06 because i thought the length of bullet might help with my accuracy problem, it did too my ruger shoots tiny groups with this bullet and 51 grains of 4350. reading my loading manuals its like a lot of calibers you lose so little in the trajectory department its not worth considering. i am worried about this bullet opening up properly tho.

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    Cub
    What was the range you shot your moose at?

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