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Thread: 30-06 on Caribou

  1. #1

    Default 30-06 on Caribou

    Is the 30-06 a good caliber for Caribou or Moose?
    I am looking at a Remongton Ti in 30-06, does any one have experience with these rifles? How is their accuracy out of the box with factory loads?

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    It's a fantastic caliber, and has probably killed more caribou and moose than any other caliber. I use 150 grain for caribou, 180 for moose, though some use larger.

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    Member Bear Buster's Avatar
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    Default Perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by EDF View Post
    Is the 30-06 a good caliber for Caribou or Moose?
    I am looking at a Remongton Ti in 30-06, does any one have experience with these rifles? How is their accuracy out of the box with factory loads?
    That will work just fine!
    Use good quality bullets and enjoy some of the finest table fair in the world.

  4. #4

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    You should do just fine with that caliber, I recently purchased one myself.

    Are you referring to the Remington 700 TI (which I believe is no longer in production?) or 700 TI Alaskan? As for the 700 TI, my wife has one in .270 and I've been very impressed with that gun. With the right handloads it is very accurate, it's incredibly light in weight and a dream to shoot (in my opinion). I had a hard time with the $1,000 price tag they carried when they first came out. But then again, it wasn't my check book that was opened for the one in my gun cabinet

  5. #5

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    Thanks for the input.
    I am referring to the Ti Alaskan, have looked at them a few times and love the light weight.

  6. #6

    Default The .06

    .06 will work perfect for moose and bou, I use 180 grain for both 'cause I hunt both on the same trip and don't like switching bullet weights.

    If this is your first time moose hunting, a little warning - they're a LOT bigger than any other North American game, unless you've been bison hunting.

  7. #7

    Default The 30-06

    The 30-06 and 180 gr. Nosler Partitions, Barnes X, Swift A-Frame etc. Plenty of power, mild recoil and every gun maker sells one. It is what it is, a proven killer! Always own at least one.

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    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Not to hijack the thread, but does anybody have opinions on the Tika in a 30-06? Was looking at them at Sportsman's awhile back. Seemed like a very light gun. The salesman said the 300 WM in that model was not much heavier but kicked like a mule because of its light weight. I think it was the T3 I was looking at.

    Thanks in advance.

  9. #9

    Default

    I do own a Remington Titanium 30-06 with the spiral cut bolt. Purchased it 4 years ago new, so I suspect it is the original ti (not Alaskan ti). Very accurate rifle, but finicky when picking out hunting loads. I have always been impressed by the Nolser Partition bullets in just about any calibre - reliably accurate and very predictable expansion. The titanium Remington rifle did not shoot the partitions well. The rifle has a very lightweight barrel and I suspect that is the main reason for the need to choose bullets and powder loads carefully with this rifle.

    I purchased my son a Remington Mountain LSS in 30-06 at about the same time, and his rifle will shoot the Nosler Partitions very accurately. I settled on 56.5 grains of IMR 4350 and the 165 grain Partition to load for his rifle.

    My titanium 30-06 is an absolute tack driver with the plastic tipped Nosler Ballistic tip bullets in 150 grain and 165 grain scooted along by some pretty fast powder loads. I cannot reconcile myself to using that bullet as my choice for a big game hunting round here in Alaska as the bullets tend toward being thin skinned and fragile. I probably shot 500 rounds using different brand bullet and powder combinations in the titanium rifle to find a good hunting combination (lots of small batches of 10 rounds each with different bullets and powders in ziploc sandwich bags). Chimo Guns and Sportsman's Warehouse really appreciated me for that tediuous and costly process. The newer Nosler Accubond in 150 Grain is a very accurate bullet that agrees with the titanium rifle, but still not as perfectly suited to that rifle as the Ballistic Tip.
    If I were faced with the purchase over again I would settle on the Model 700 Mountain LSS in 30-06. Stainless is the way to go in our wet climate where a tent is the shelter most often used on hunting trips. The Mountain LSS is a beautiful rifle also - the laminated wood stocks really look nice with the satin stainless - it has to be one of the nicest looking production rifles made. It weighs just a tad more than the ti and is quieter when going through the brush (the hard plastic stocks on the titanium rifles tend to have a dry, hollow, clinky sound to them when brushed against limbs or tundra). I have not shot any game animals with the titanium rifle, but over a long summer blew the snot out of a large stack of 9" white paper plates that served as targets when drawn up in quarters with a magic marker and a bright orange sticky dot placed square in the middle of the cross.

    Also might add that I did not have one malfunction or cosmetic blemish on the titanium rifle that I purchased. Both of these Remington factory rifles were very well made and nicely finished. I did adjust the triggers down to just a tad below 4 pounds of pull as they come very heavy from the factory (you can find directions for every step of the process easily on the internet and it takes only a few minutes - I am no gunsmith by any means).

    Hope this personal experience is of some help (I paid right around $1,150.00 for the ti 4 years ago - have no idea what they are going for now).
    Tommy

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    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Perfect for a mixed bag hunt. More bushkins tote .30-06s than just about anything else.

    More power can be had with Federal High Energy or Hornady Lite Magnum which will push the .30-06 into .300 H&H territory if you think you need it.
    Now what ?

  11. #11
    Member barrowdave's Avatar
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    My friend and I both used 06's this year with Hornady 180 gr SP Interlocks and both got nice bulls that dropped in their tracks. We both use Rugers. Another friend I have hunted with for years shot a moose in Canada last year with his 06 at 280 yds; it went 20 yds and dropped. You might want to look at the Ruger M77 MKII Ultra-light. That is what I use and although I have several others that is what I always use. Shoots MOA with the factory ammo and is very light to carry around. Just a sweet rifle. Think you can get them now in wood/blue or stainless/synthetic. And you would probably save enough over the Remington to put a nice scope on.

    Dave

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    Default T-3

    My son has a Tikka T-3 30-06 and loves it. It is a very accurate rifle right out of the box. I have some concern about the "plastic" ammo clip, but it has been fine so far. I think Boondocks in Eagle River carries them as well.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy SoHappy View Post
    I do own a Remington Titanium 30-06 with the spiral cut bolt. Purchased it 4 years ago new, so I suspect it is the original ti (not Alaskan ti). Very accurate rifle, but finicky when picking out hunting loads. I have always been impressed by the Nolser Partition bullets in just about any calibre - reliably accurate and very predictable expansion. The titanium Remington rifle did not shoot the partitions well. The rifle has a very lightweight barrel and I suspect that is the main reason for the need to choose bullets and powder loads carefully with this rifle.

    I purchased my son a Remington Mountain LSS in 30-06 at about the same time, and his rifle will shoot the Nosler Partitions very accurately. I settled on 56.5 grains of IMR 4350 and the 165 grain Partition to load for his rifle.

    My titanium 30-06 is an absolute tack driver with the plastic tipped Nosler Ballistic tip bullets in 150 grain and 165 grain scooted along by some pretty fast powder loads. I cannot reconcile myself to using that bullet as my choice for a big game hunting round here in Alaska as the bullets tend toward being thin skinned and fragile. I probably shot 500 rounds using different brand bullet and powder combinations in the titanium rifle to find a good hunting combination (lots of small batches of 10 rounds each with different bullets and powders in ziploc sandwich bags). Chimo Guns and Sportsman's Warehouse really appreciated me for that tediuous and costly process. The newer Nosler Accubond in 150 Grain is a very accurate bullet that agrees with the titanium rifle, but still not as perfectly suited to that rifle as the Ballistic Tip.

    Tommy
    Tommy, I've experienced similar results with Nosler Partitions and my wife's 700 TI .270. After messing around awhile, I did find a powder charge that gave me pretty good groupings with the 150 grain Partitions. 55 grains of H4831SC I believe (but am not positive). Between my wife and I, we've taken 4 elk with that combo with wonderful results. But none of the factory ammo I tried would group well. The Nosler BTs and Sierra GameKings definitely make that 700 TI a tack driver. But antelope is about all I used those bullets for.

    I believe I've seen the 700 TI Alaskans priced between $1200 and $1400. Depending on what you want, you could make pretty good progress in having a custom gun built for that price.

  14. #14
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    Default .06 great for caribou

    In my Ruger MKII m 77, I shoot 180s for moose and caribou (saves the trouble of resighting). This is an awesome gun- super reliable, accurate, plenty of power with the cheapo Remington bullets to drop a caribou at 350+ yds. like I did in December. Just have to aim for the top of the shoulder at that distance. For an Alaska gun, I'm glad I bought the .30-06. It will really take anything except the big bears.

  15. #15

    Default 30-06 Remington Ti

    I have one of the 30-06 Remington Ti rifles and it is a fine gun, shooting great groups right out of the box. Mine is the 2006 model which weighs a little over 5 lbs. The new Mountain Ti weighs more (about 6.25 pounds) but admittedly has more features (and a higher price tag). There always is that tradeoff.

    As for the .06 caliber for moose and caribou, it is great round, and all too often overlooked in the realm of magnum cartidges. While I admit that I have both a 300 WSM and 325 WSM, I hunted with an 30.06 for years and it does the work of death just fine. I like Federal's Vital Shock 180 gr Nosler Partition round the best for the 30.06. Its a high energy round that nearly has ballistics of a 300 mag. They used to be $25 a box but they are now about $50. Ouch!

  16. #16
    Member LungShot's Avatar
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    Default Tika

    Quote Originally Posted by jmg View Post
    Not to hijack the thread, but does anybody have opinions on the Tika in a 30-06? Was looking at them at Sportsman's awhile back. Seemed like a very light gun. The salesman said the 300 WM in that model was not much heavier but kicked like a mule because of its light weight. I think it was the T3 I was looking at.

    Thanks in advance.
    Tika's are great. My cousin has the 300WM, and loves it.

  17. #17

    Default

    Chuck Hawks is one of my favorite writers to seek the wisdom of with a firearm, bullet, or cartridge question.
    Here's what Chuck has concerning the Tikka rifles: http://www.chuckhawks.com/critical_look_T3.htm

    To Barrowdave, fellow fan of the Ruger Ultralight on this thread:

    Years ago I bought a Ruger Ultralight rifle when the only calibers available were in the short action .308 genre i.e. .243, 7mm-08. The first ones Ruger came out with were designed like the full length stock jobber that Lee Harvey Oswald made famous - they were really short and light, but having been frightened and stunned as a school boy by JFK's murder, that Mannlicher stock gave me the creeps for looks. When the more traditional looking ultralight came out, I bought one in .308.

    I used that little rifle as "the" rifle for many years on spring and fall hunts, and numerous late season personal hunts when the guiding season was over. Once, when applying for a special use permit on federal land, I had to tally and list experience in the field on guided hunts including names and addresses of clients and dates of hunts to verify the information and all of this mumbo-jumbo BS that only a bored bureaucrat could dream up to plague a man. At that time I still had receipts and records for all of it (since lost in a terrible, life-changing fire) and was able to satisfy the requirement. It was a beneficial process in some ways, because it prompted reflection and an over-due effort to accurately sum up in memory what had become foggy with time. I was forced to find each receipt and journal with names and phone numbers of fellows I had spent time with in the field on those epochal hunts.
    To sum it up - That little Ruger ultralight .308 had spent enough 10 day hunts over a period of 18 years to total 3 years of hunting and sleeping in a damp, 2 man tent. Talk about rust and abuse from alders and steep scree slopes. Teamed up with a leupold 1.5 X 5 gold ring scope and the trusty green boxes of Remington 150 grain cartridges, it never failed to find the target when called up.

    Many times wealthy or inexperienced hunters who just had to bring the latest wildcat cartridge and newly built custom rifle on their Alaskan hunt would fall back on that little Ruger when their own gun jammed or their fancy European scope fogged up or fell apart in the field. I always carried the rifle, even when a shoulder holstered 44 would have been more convenient on sheep hunts. "Here, use this" accounted for a good number of lethal follow-up shots on sheep, goats, caribou, black and grizzly bear. Nobody ever balked at that ugly beat up little rifle sliding across the dirt toward them in those situations. And invariably, they would remark after firing the rifle in haste and finishing off their trophy "What the heck is this thing? it weighs nothing! it looks like a piece of stinkin' burnt driftwood!" and then in the next breath "I can't believe my gun jammed, I paid $3,000.00 for it".

    So, why is it that while owning a Remington titanium that will shoot sub MOA groups I never have used it to hunt with? Well, I donít want to mess it up, itís too perty, sorta like that special shirt you saved for the big date - and I have my heart set on some day killing a big mule deer with it. So, the little Ruger still goes everywhere and is the gun reached for in the trenches.

    Moral of the story is: buy American - support your brothers and sisters in this unique and blessed nation of ours, and stick with common brands -you will be dollars ahead and have a trusted tool with you in the field.
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    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy SoHappy View Post
    Chuck Hawks is one of my favorite writers to seek the wisdom of with a firearm, bullet, or cartridge question.
    Here's what Chuck has concerning the Tikka rifles: http://www.chuckhawks.com/critical_look_T3.htm
    Wow, not a very favorable opinion of the T3. Interesting perspective as well. As an occasional shooter who puts less than 100 rounds through rifles each year - some years less than 50 - the Tika may work for me though. This Chuck Hawkes opinion is great, and very valuable I imagine for die hard gun enthusiasts. But asking him whether a Tika might be a decent gun to buy might be like asking Mario Andretti if a Toyota Corrolla is a decent car to buy? My Ferrari's come in the form of fly rods, not hunting rifles. I do have some concern over the plastic magazine clip though on the T3.

    Thanks for the post. Good read.

  19. #19

    Default 50-100 Rounds

    Quote Originally Posted by jmg View Post
    Wow, not a very favorable opinion of the T3. Interesting perspective as well. As an occasional shooter who puts less than 100 rounds through rifles each year - some years less than 50 - the Tika may work for me though. This Chuck Hawkes opinion is great, and very valuable I imagine for die hard gun enthusiasts. But asking him whether a Tika might be a decent gun to buy might be like asking Mario Andretti if a Toyota Corrolla is a decent car to buy? My Ferrari's come in the form of fly rods, not hunting rifles. I do have some concern over the plastic magazine clip though on the T3.

    Thanks for the post. Good read.
    Hey jmg - just my opinion, but if you're not going to shoot this gun a lot, not sure paying the extra dough for a Tikka is needed, if the Ruger ultralight would work for you. I have the MkII (not the untralite) in .338 WinMag, just love it. I didn't like the plastic feel to the Tikka stock...

    Again, just my .02, I tend not to buy expensive rifles, just solid reliable brands (most of mine are Winchesters or Rugers).

  20. #20
    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdhunter View Post
    Hey jmg - just my opinion, but if you're not going to shoot this gun a lot, not sure paying the extra dough for a Tikka is needed, if the Ruger ultralight would work for you. I have the MkII (not the untralite) in .338 WinMag, just love it. I didn't like the plastic feel to the Tikka stock...

    Again, just my .02, I tend not to buy expensive rifles, just solid reliable brands (most of mine are Winchesters or Rugers).

    Ruger's website lists the MKII 30-06 at $779. Aren't the Tikka's around $650 or less? I have shot a few Ruger 1's over the years though and did like them a lot.

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