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Thread: keeping eggs on long trip

  1. #1
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Default keeping eggs on long trip

    This might be the wrong forum, but it has more to do with going hunting than cooking. SoÖ.
    What is your favorite way to preserve/carry eggs for a ten + day trip? I have not found a method Iím totally happy with. At this point Iím tempted to just crack a few dozen into a container and try to keep it cool, but am worried they will spoil rapidly. Any suggestions?

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Eggs kept in the shell, if kept at room temperature and below, will actually survive 10 days just fine. At least, they haven't killed me yet Usually when I get to a camp I will dig a fairly deep hole for my stuff I want to keep cool, or I put it in a dry bag and sink it in a creek.

    Coleman makes a plastic egg box that is great for eggs.

  3. #3

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    I took a dozen eggs with me on a two week trapping trip. Of course they all froze and cracked. It was a real trick to thaw them out enough to get the egg out of the shell without all kinds of shell fragments. I finally just resigned myself to crunching on shells along with the scrambled eggs.

    These days I ask myself if I'm going hunting or camping. If I'm going hunting I don't worry about the food...just enough to get by as easily as possible. Camping is a different deal and cooking is part of the experience.

    I would just pack the eggs as well as possible in their shell.
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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    I grew up on a farm and we colected eggs from our chickens. Some nest would have a dozen eggs, one per day, in them before we found them. If they survive that then they should do just fine as long as you keep them out of the sun.

    Have you ever tried using powdered eggs? Not quite as good, but much more compact and lighter without the worry of spoilage.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Coleman makes a plastic egg box that is great for eggs.
    That's what I use to use, still the best way to pack fresh eggs. Now I just go with Egg Beaters in the carton. Easy to pack and better for you too, after seeing my cholesterol levels I need to pay attention to these things now.

    Woody

  6. #6
    Member jeff p's Avatar
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    Default eggs

    I opt for egg beaters, or if you choose just vac u seal them & put the whole thing in hot water presto eggs!

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    The egg beaters can be frozen in the carton too. Adds a few days to their "shelf life".
    Vance in AK.

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    Default oooh squishy

    hardboil them, much better way to carry them, no cooking same protein, keepm cool they last a long time

    or if you must , break them up in the frying pan with the bacon grease, and roll up in pita bread with a couple of slices of bacon and a big squirt of homemade mustard

    I vac pac pickeled eggs for back packing, great for a snack or two make a meal

  9. #9
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Believe it or not a hardboiled egg has less shelf life than an uncooked egg. The boiling removes the protective layer that keeps the bacteria out of the good part of the egg.

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    Wink dehydrate them!!!

    I bought a dehydrator for this kind of thing. I am tired of eating nasty store-bought food. I have found that I can add seasonings, cheese, ham, etc., pour out the whole works (in liquid form) on a dehydrator sheet, and after about ten hours they are completely dry. They are much lighter, less mess, and when you dehydrate them yourself at a reasonable low temperature, they reconstitute just like fresh. Life is too short for crummy food!

  11. #11
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    Default eggs

    Egg beaters all the way

  12. #12

    Default Carton in Cooler

    We've just kept them in their normal carton, in a cooler without ice, and have been OK for 7-10 day trips.

    Here's my partner on the 2006 trip...he had just made us breakfast burritos with bacon/eggs/salsa, he set his plate down when coming out of the tent, and the wind took over....I told him to get crackin and pick it up, it was WAY to good to waste, and the tundra was pretty clean...


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    Powdered does the trick. Lasts forever and weighs a fraction of fresh. Not too bad with dehydrated onion and peppers, either. Save the pack weight for good coffee. A good cup of coffee makes everything better. Even powdered eggs.

  14. #14

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    Put them in with your flour. Flour then egg more flour and egg until you have what you want. The flour keeps them cool and protects from breakage.

    When they made the trip west they put them in salt water the ones that float where used first as they were going, the water softened the trip.

  15. #15
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Thumbs up powdered

    Powdered is the way to go. Search for Harvest Foods, a Canadian company. They have a website and sell great dehydrated and freeze dried foods.

    As for eggs, if they have been refridgerated, they are already on the down slide. If you can get ahold of some from a local farmer (eggs that have not yet been refridgerated), they will keep much, much, longer. Once they get refridgerated that first time, the clock is a ticking.

    I like dehydrating bell pepper, onion, mushroom, etc.. and take the bacon that is already cooked and needs no refridgeration. Mix that up with cheese, garlic powder, etc.. and use the Harvest Foods powdered eggs and you will have a fine omelet. The powdered eggs (higher quality ones) are great if you will just cook something into them. Make omelets.

    Or take bagels and the precooked bacon I told you about, or better yet, country ham, and cook up some eggs and have country ham, egg, and cheese bagels. Two of them will get you going in the morning. And none of the ingredients need refridgeration. Take regular cheese slices. They keep well over a week in a dry bag. Many cheeses are not even delivered in refridgerated trucks. No need for it. Once in the grocery store they are refridgerated because that is what the customer expects to see. And shelf life is increased. But cheese (in general) does not need to be refridgerated nearly as much as we are made to believe. Most of it, especially the firmer stuff, will keep for weeks at room temperature if left unopened. The bagels are a must try. Very filling and tasty. And unlike most breads, you can cram bagels anywhere. Hard to mess up a bagel. And they keep well too. We took this on some of our recent floats in NW Alaska. Use bacon or country ham, but use double portions to what you think would look like a normal breakfast sandwich. You will be glad you did. Heat the meat up in a pan or on foil. Good eating and easy to make.
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  16. #16

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    FYI I have heard boil them a LITTLE, 1-2 minutes I think, and they keep weeks, never tired it.

    Go to backpacker.com for food info, TONS of help/info there. I suspect some bunny huggers but still a great sight for backpack/gear info.

  17. #17
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default In the carton

    Someone mentioned Egg Beaters. We use those or any of several similar products. Just freeze the whole carton and stack them in your cooler. They become ice for your frozen foods, serving a dual purpose. They also stack nice because they're square.

    You can transport whole eggs in the containers mentioned earlier, but you cannot count on them arriving undamaged. If you HAVE to have eggs, go with the ones in the cartons.

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  18. #18
    Member Spanman's Avatar
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    My partner on the last hunt put 3-4 scrambled eggs in a vaccume bag, added pepper and salt, sealed it, froze it in a square arragement for packing in a cooler. We utilized it as an ice pack and when it dethawed we boiled it in water, we had Omlets after 10 minutes.

  19. #19

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    Absolutely, scramble your eggs with your favorite mixings, season to taste, put in a ziplock bag THEN vacuum seal the whole works and freeze. They will keep for quite a while in a cooler and you can use them as ice to help keep your other food cool. Works great!

  20. #20
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    This is what I do: I leave the eggs in the container they come from the store, cut the container in halves (eggs still inside), wrap each half with a layer of bubble wrap, and tape the wrap's end with a piece of scotch tape. Then I place each wrapped half in a Zip-Lock bag, and into the ice chest with the rest of foods I need to keep cold. If it gets too cold (around 30 degrees) during moose season in September, the ice chest keeps the eggs insulated inside, and if it gets too hot, the ice chest still keeps them cool for two weeks. However, it's cool for a week or two sometimes. When so, I just pull the egg containers out of the ice chest, place them on a cooking table by the trees (in the shade), and leave them there as long as I want.

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