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Thread: Hunting Dog Advice

  1. #1

    Default Hunting Dog Advice

    I am looking to buy a good hunting dog in the spring or summer.
    I am still undecided on what breed. I'll tell you what I am looking for in a dog and any and everyone give me some advice on what they think might be a good fit.

    I want a small/medium sized dog that can hunt spruce hens possibly, really just a good all around bird hunting type dog that I can take out with me on hunting trips. I don't want a dog that sheds a lot. I am also looking for a dog that is a good family dog as I want to keep it inside and I have an 10-month old, so would have to be good with kids.


    I've been thinking about possibly the German Shorthair, but still up in the aire.


    Thanks a lot for the advice in advance,


    Marc
    Marc Theiler

  2. #2
    Member Burke's Avatar
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    Default choosing a dog

    There are many breeds to choose from, all of them good...and as many opionions as there are breeds...do you have a hunting style that you prefer? Pointing or flushing? Do you want to hunt waterfowl as well? These are question to ask yourself, then start narrowing down the different breeds. Do you like the looks of one breed over the other? They all shed, some more than others but some you just don't see it as much. I have three different breed and have hunted over several more. PM me and we can talk more...I will give you my phone number, it is easier than typing it all out.

  3. #3
    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    Default humm

    You might want to rethink this & put it off until you have time to work with the dog. From your response the last time you posted this it seems that the you wouldn't have much time to train the dog & in the end you will both be frustrated. GSP's require daily exercise & someone to be there almost all of the time.

  4. #4
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    Default

    As a springer spaniel owner, I would recommend one. They do shed but I have not found it to be that bad.
    Springers are great flushers and swim like a fish but i have found that they don't do well in water when it is cold out. My dog Hank, with very little training flushed and retrieved his first ptarmigan at eight months.
    I spent the next year deployed frequently and did not spend the time needed to train him for hunting so he has been house dog since.
    Get a dog from a good breeder with a good blood line and you will be much happier.
    Let us all know what you decide. If you do consider a springer, pm me and I will tell you what I know.

  5. #5

    Default Breed Traits

    I have owned -trained and hunted several breeds over the years, -GSP, Springer Spaniels, Labs, Britts. They all are great dogs but each has their pluses and minuses. I prefer flushing dogs mainly so I don't have to "play dog" and go into the briars and pucker brush. My favorite dog of all the dogs I have owned was a Springer (Randy). He had a great nose, was easily trained, stayed fairly close. Like all dogs and all humans he had his quirks some I was able to retrain him on and some I learned to deal with. Springers are "people dogs" Yes some people keep them in kennels but they flourish inside the home. I found that the Springers and Labs for me were the most "people oreinted" dogs / family dogs. Both the Britts I had and the Gsp were a little aloof. I had both females and males and after going through the "pup" thing many years ago decided to fix all my dogs at the earliest possible time recommended by my Vet. I would agree that you need to find a good breeder - if possible visit the Kennel/Breeder. On Springers you want a Field Spaniel verus Show- Springers are one of the only breeds where this makes a big difference. The other breeds are usually dual use dogs. I know the Springers can take the cold, the Labs can, the GSP's I had did not cope with cold weather well. If I can share more information PM me.

  6. #6

    Default Good site

    You may want to check out the below site. Articles on dog training-hunting, supplies, including dogs for sale.. excellent information on a wide range of topics.

    www.gundogsonline.com



  7. #7
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    Default brittany

    French Brittany= small to medium build, great family dog, no shedding, great bird dog, easy to train and eager to please. Love mine!!

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKMarmot View Post
    You might want to rethink this & put it off until you have time to work with the dog. From your response the last time you posted this it seems that the you wouldn't have much time to train the dog & in the end you will both be frustrated. GSP's require daily exercise & someone to be there almost all of the time.

    Yeah, since then one of my dogs was hit by a car and died. I believe I will have the time to work with the pup that's why I am back posting about possibilities as at the time of the last posting I wanted to give myself more time since I already had enough dogs on my plate.

    I realize the time involved and have been around many, many dog trainers and bird dogs, mostly pointers.
    Marc Theiler

  9. #9

    Default Springers

    Yeah, I have actually been thinking about the springer spaniel. I will only get a top notch bred dog. I will have to start looking around.
    Marc Theiler

  10. #10
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Default Springers Rule

    We've had 4 in the past 32 years my wife and I've been married. Also had one while I was growing up. Very loving dogs, great with family, but sometimes you might have to bop 'em in the head with a 2x4 just to get their attention. (kidding)

    Would recommend highly.

  11. #11
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Default the best breed...

    Okay, Marc, I'm biased, but the wirehaired pointing grifffon is THE dog for AK.

    They are superb upland pointers, great retrievers and excellent in the duck blind with their webbed feet and thick undercoat. I had a shorthair in AK and she faired poorly in the cold. Griffs are far better equipped for the weather with their longer hair.

    We have limited breedings, our dam and sire are here on premises.

    Frank--Northstar Griffons
    Last edited by fullkurl; 10-25-2008 at 00:15.

  12. #12

    Default wirehaired pointing griffon

    Very, very interesting. That breed does sound perfect, wow I've never heard of the breed before.

    I wonder if there are any breeders up here?
    Marc Theiler

  13. #13

    Default

    I'm going to second the French Brittany, especially since you have kids. They are the smallest of the pointing breeds and are great house dogs. Before I got my first one I was considering a springer but the possibility of rage syndrome scared me off, even though the possibility would be remote with a good breeder.

    GSP's are nice dogs, but so much bigger than the French-Brits. I also wonder how much cold they can take compared to the Fr.Brit. I got a 5 mo. old Fr. Brit. that I'd handled as a pup, but no one took him and he was a kennel dog. He came from a cold area and had a very heavy coat when I got him. He settled into the house very quickly and is just a great big lover. It's hard to find dogs that are birdier. In Europe, most years they win the all breed field trials held in the spring and fall.

  14. #14
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    Default german wirehaired pointer

    Theilercabin, find a member of the North American Versatile Hunting Dog Association up there and talk to them. I like the german wirehaired pointer or the german version the draathar. They have a little bigger gene pool than the griffs. Whatever you decide on make sure you go and see the parents and preferable hunting. The apples don't fall far from the tree.

  15. #15
    Member 3CBRS's Avatar
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    Default

    Greatland NAVHDA's website - http://greatlandnavhda.org/

    Arctic Bird Dog Association's website - http://www.arcticbirddog.com/index.html

  16. #16
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    Default labs rule

    Just have to get my vote in for one of the world's most versatile dogs, the Labrador. Yeah, mundane, everybody has one, not special enough. I have heard it all. But over the years they continue to amaze me as to what all they can learn and do.
    I have seen some pretty big labs act small, and some small labs act big. Really though there is not that much difference in a 50lb and a 75lb dog all other things being equal.
    Whatever the breed, the dog needs to match your hunting style. If you hunt where it is very physically challenging, a slightly larger (70lb+/-) dog does a bit better than smaller ones. There is just more muscle there to push with. No, I am not a fan of the 100lb lab.
    Good input from others on the GSP. They are not known as sedentary dogs. If you aren't willing to be active a lot, probably not a good choice. The GWHP is intriguing. A friend in JNU has one and that dog does well under a variety of conditions. I did see that his dog does have a lot of energy around the house, but it seemed controllable.
    Whatever the breed, I suggest you talk with people who do not breed that type of dog, but know who does. They tend to not have anything to gain or lose and you will get honest feedback most of the time. Breeders tend to have a product they want you to have and really want you to go home with one of their pups vs somebody elses. Not to say people aren't honest, but face it. If I have a litter of pups, why would I want you to buy a bup elsewhere?

  17. #17
    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Default

    My vote for Labs also. 90&#37; of the time they are pets, and it doesn't get any better than a lab for being around the house (their tails can be registered deadly weapons though) and especially around kids. I like their versatility (upland, waterfowl, rabbits, slippers), their demeanor, their looks. They do shed, but I haven't seen a working dog yet that doesn't. There are "small" labs (<55 lbs) out there, just as there are "large" labs (>100 lbs). I wouldn't own anything else (I've got three in the house now - two are mine and one is my son's).

    Have fun,

    SH

  18. #18
    Member Burke's Avatar
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    Default sent you a pm

    talk to you later and look forward to meeting you

  19. #19

    Default

    The germans have bred a dog for the exact purpose you state: will point all upland, will retrieve like a lab, will track like a hound and curl up next to your family. It called a Drahthaar. They are not registered with the AKC, but with the VDD. Just google VDD and you will see. You cannot even breed this dog without permission from Germany and it has to achieve certain scores in certain tests it can be certified to breed. They are also bred for even temperament. The versatility of the dog is the underlying philosophy of the VDD.

  20. #20

    Default Lab

    Labs rule. They have so many great hunting characteristics plus they are the best family dog. My dog will break through ice to swim after ducks. They also look cool in the back of your truck. I have had labs all my life and would have nothing else, but I'm really bias and I am a really bad hunter so take it for what it's worth.
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    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

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