Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: Proper way to get into or hang a tree stand?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, Ak
    Posts
    121

    Default Proper way to get into or hang a tree stand?

    No one has ever taught me, and it's bad enough that I don't like heights. So, I need the proper way to hang and get into a tree stand. Last time, I had a friend hang, then I just climbed up into it. But how do you put the pegs in, strap on your harness and climb up and pull your stand up and hang it? Once hung, when you're getting in and out do you keep your harness on? I need all the info. I can get!!!! It's especially important this year, since I'll be running my own bait station. I would prefer to be on the ground, but it makes sense to be up in a tree, when baiting bears. All info. is greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    1,888
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Bring someone out in the woods with you. purchasing climbing sticks as opposed to tree pegs is much easier. especially being concerned with heights. I have had more close calls whitetail hunting when climbing into the stand for the first time. Its nice to have someone with you so they can hand the stand up to you and hand stuff up if you drop it.

  4. #4
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,402

    Default SOME info

    I will try to give you some hints.

    1. Buy a safety restraint system that has a fall arrest system and a lineman's belt.
    2. ALWAYS wear number one.
    3. Never use a dead tree.
    4. Clear the ground around the stand of anything that you might fall on.
    5. Place steps on the side of the tree that is not leaning, if it leans.
    6. Be sure to place steps not too far apart. You never want to reach for a step. Heavy clothes restrict your steps and rain gear.
    7. Never use a limb as a step. Live or dead.
    8. As you place steps, place 2-3 above the height where you want to hang the stand. Most accidents happen, getting into and out of the treestand. Having a couple above allows you to step down onto the stand. Having one as a hand hold helps too.
    9. Place 2-3 gear hooks around the tree and tie a gear rope to one of them.
    10. Never climb the tree with any gear.
    11. Fasten yourself to the tree immediately after stepping onto the stand.
    12. Always pull your gear up, and hang it onto the hooks before setting your bow up.
    13. An umbrella that attaches above the stand at 5-6 feet makes the rain bearable.
    14. A pee bottle that is a different color than you water bottle helps. You don't have to get down as much.
    15. If you start falling asleep, you may want to get down, go for a walk or something to wake yourself up. Last year we started doing shore lunches and it helps with our endurance.
    16. Always at the beginning of the season inspect all of your treestand gear for safety. Frayed cables, rusty parts, loose nuts....
    17. Always leave a hunt plan with somebody. (Guilty as heck here as I archery hunt.)
    18. Be comfortable, take a small book, food, drinks, a camera....
    19. There are several ratchet rope systems that will assist you with pulling the stand up the tree. You tie it off when you place the steps, then pull the stand up from the ground.
    20. Always use another tree, limbs or something behind your tree to break up your outline.
    21. Practice from your treestand in your yard before. Try sitting, remember, bend at the waist to shoot. Practice at the same height that you plan on hanging the stands.


    And I am sure I forgot something.....

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  5. #5
    Member Matt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    3,410

    Default

    Just buy a ladder stand. Problem solved.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, Ak
    Posts
    121

    Default thanks

    Especially to Dave!! All the info. is great, it never hurts to get someone else's opinion. Thanks again!!!

  7. #7
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,402

    Default Forgot one

    I forgot one. The very first time you set up your stand, do it in your yard in a controled enviroment, only 2-3 feet off of the ground. Climb into it and test it out. That way you can see exactly how to set it up and if you make a mistake it won't be so painful.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  8. #8
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,291

    Default new school

    just get a climber tree stand, problem solved. Bears didn't bother mine and left out there all season. Easy for other people to use also. Still a good idea to use the harness and fall arrest, I'll admit I don't own the restraint and never have used one.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mile 102 Glenn Highway
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Dave pretty well covered it. His #1 and #2 is the most important use a quality fall restraint system and be tied off at all times. Your life depends on it.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    102

    Talking Tree Stand

    Quote Originally Posted by akrstabout View Post
    just get a climber tree stand, problem solved. Bears didn't bother mine and left out there all season. Easy for other people to use also. Still a good idea to use the harness and fall arrest, I'll admit I don't own the restraint and never have used one.
    I second akrstabout idea, just get a climber tree stand if you can. There are videos available that can show you how to get in and out of your tree stand, whether it is a self climbing or not. Check out Summit Tree stands online. They have a whole host videos you can select from. However, it is not just important to learn how to use your stand but what to do if you fall out while in a harness. I believe tree stands are the number 1 cause of hunter injuries, so it is worth spending the money/taking time to learn how to get into and out of your stand.

    Good luck with your bait station.

  11. #11

    Default

    I have done about 90% of my big game hunting from a stand, here in Ohio it is the only way to bowhunt. Climbing stands are GREAT. Work everywhere.

    Always have a saety HARNESS on, belts will kill you. Take the belt off, nothing is better, at least you die quick vs slowly. Studies show pretty much no one, not even a marine in great shape can get out of a belt alive.

    Always wear harness. I have had some close calls you would never expect. Always. Once you are used to it there is no problem.

  12. #12
    Member markopolo50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Fenton,Michigan
    Posts
    838

    Default

    I like my climbing treestand, a Treelounger. It has a safety belt that is attached to the stand; I put it on before I leave the ground. Mine has a "bow platform" which allows you to stand up if necessary. It is a bit heavy but is well worth the carry, especially if you are staying all day. It is the most comfortable tree stand I have ever been in. I can take a nap with no problem and feel very safe at 25' up. I have stayed in the stand many days from daylight to dark. Never would be able to in anything else. Just my 2 cents.

  13. #13

    Default Dave covered it pretty well

    The only thing I would add is to look at the Summit system with the rope and Prussic knot. That is the best system I have seen- impossible to get hurt.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Hummelstown, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by beendare View Post
    The only thing I would add is to look at the Summit system with the rope and Prussic knot. That is the best system I have seen- impossible to get hurt.
    Summit makes the Seat-o-the-pants harness and it is the best. Also, you can buy extra safety ropes with the prussic knots. That way you can leave the rope in place and actually connect into it before stepping onto the stand. I've stepped onto some wet/icy stands and was glad that I had the belt on.

  15. #15
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    I own three climbing stands. Last year I was given my first strap on stand with climbing sticks. I can't ever see myself going back to a climbing stand. When I leave, I just remove my climbing sticks as I go down and I don't have stands stolen this way.

  16. #16
    Mark
    Guest

    Default

    I use a Goliath climbing tree stand. The Goliath has the highest weight rating; 350 lbs.

    I also use a fall-restraint harness.

  17. #17

    Default

    i'm not sure if its been posted yet.

    There is a harness system that works extremely well compared to what is mostly out there. You can buy it (but I cant remember the name of the company who sells it, or make it using a web 'belt', 2 pieces of rope and a carabenor or two).

    it's based of the Prusik knot. You'll have to use your pole climbing belt for the first ascent to hang steps and hang the belt containing the rope with the prusik knot on it. After that it's a simple clip onto the prusik knots carbenor and up you go. Much easier then your tree climbing belt.

    To get my stands up I like to get the last step in plus one. Then haul up the stand (I like hang ons and strap on steps, will never use screw ins again and the one ladder I've played with is to dog gone heavy to pack at all). Haul it up and hang it, easy enough......then grab the front end of the stand, make sure it's safe instead of jumping in it. I then get in, ease my overly large american style rear end in and away ya go.

    Did a quick search and found the system I was thinking of. I'll have one for sure if I hunt deer again next fall. If not it may be a long time before a tree sees me hanging from it again

    http://www.summitstands.com/productd...aspx?id=329141

    I'll use between 6 and 8 strap on steps depending on the tree, its surroundings and my mood at the time

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    FAI
    Posts
    2,294

    Default your concerns

    If you are wary of heights, then use the equipment that helps you with that fear. Ladder stands are a great safe way to be up high. Climbers are pretty good as you are facing the tree while climbing but then you have to get mentally prepped to come down again. Ladder or climbing sticks are a good option, but they are not as good as a real ladder. If you can take in an extension ladder and place it at a 4:1 angle, that is the same as what you would do around the house.
    Dave IB has one of the best heads on this forum, but I disagree with him on one point that others have made too. My background is industrial safety. There are 2 aspects to fall safety, restraint/prevention and arrest. The first means you can not fall. You do so by railings or a lanyard belt/harness system set up in a manner that you can not fall off of the level you are on. The second is fall arrest. That means you can fall off of the level, but you want to stop the fall short of the ground.
    With both aspects, a harness is the best way to go. You can use a belt for fall restraint, but NEVER for fall arrest. It does not matter how far you might fall. For fall arrest, you must have on a full body harness. By the time you have dropped 2' you are accelerating to the point that you probably can not catch yourself. The harness will spread the forces of the fall across the body. A fall of 6' can build forces in excess of 3,000lbs if you are using only a synthetic lanyard without a shock absorber.
    I always use a lanyard that wraps around the tree. I never use an eye bolt or similar hardware as an anchor. My anchor is placed above head height while sitting, and the lanyard is adjusted/shortened so that I can just bend over to reach my water bottle. Harnesses, especially the kind made with a vest, are comfortable and easy to don.
    Remember, if you ever fall and are suspended, you have to have a way to self rescue. Problems with blood flow can start in as few as 15 minutes, and people may become unconscious in as little as 30 minutes. The proplem is known as SUSPENSION TRAUMA or ORTHOSTATIC INTOLERANCE. A person that has been suspended for extended lengths of time should seek medical attention, as problems can present later.
    Miller/Sperian does make a strap that connects to the webbing on your harness that can be used for a step to relieve pressure on your arteries/legs.
    Sorry to get so long winded, but this is an issue I have been dealing with at work for 5 years. The fixes are really pretty easy, but a few of the other points are missed, which can lead to other issues. Let us know how you solve your problem Bigbear.

  19. #19

    Default

    All really good ideas. The one thing I think that is really important if having a knife with you. Carry it somewhere where you can get to it; on your hip or across the chest strap. A pack is not the place when you are hanging and you need to cut yourself free. Just make sure you are holding on to that tree when you cut yourself free .

  20. #20

    Default sop

    I like the harness, seat o pants was so hard to get on, and confusing I nearly went nuts, get a safety vest, because the SOP will frustrate the heck out of you.

    FYI I have a seat o pants I will let go cheap if anyone is interested.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •