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Thread: Food on backpack hunts

  1. #1
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    Default Food on backpack hunts

    New to the forum. Seems like there's lots of great info and hunters here.

    I have a question about what people do with their food on extended backpacking hunts. I've been on 2 short backpack hunts for bou and goats and used a bearproof canister for our food. On the goat hunt, I watch a sow black bear and cub walk within 50 yards of the canister and not bother it. I'm going on my first 10-day sheep hunt this fall and would prefer not to carry the canister for this many days. I doubt that 10 days worth of food for 2 will fit into one canister. Carrying all of the food while hunting from basecamp doesn't seem like a great idea either. Any suggestions for protecting your food while gone from camp above treeline?

  2. #2

    Cool Sheep Hunt Food

    I have never had bear problems with food. Most of the time you are using freeze dried, not much smell- zero leftovers. I did have to track a bear down one time that made off with my sheep skull. That was my fault for leaving it lying around. As long as your not cooking bacon I personally don't think food is the issue, sheep meat ; now that's another story.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheep Hunter View Post
    I did have to track a bear down one time that made off with my sheep skull. That was my fault for leaving it lying around. As long as your not cooking bacon I personally don't think food is the issue, sheep meat ; now that's another story.
    STOLE YOUR SHEEP SKULL!!! I hope you gave him the maximum sentence for this crime!
    Everything that lives and moves will be food for you.
    Genesis 9:3

  4. #4

    Default easy

    Quote Originally Posted by pearljam View Post
    New to the forum. Seems like there's lots of great info and hunters here.

    I have a question about what people do with their food on extended backpacking hunts. I've been on 2 short backpack hunts for bou and goats and used a bearproof canister for our food. On the goat hunt, I watch a sow black bear and cub walk within 50 yards of the canister and not bother it. I'm going on my first 10-day sheep hunt this fall and would prefer not to carry the canister for this many days. I doubt that 10 days worth of food for 2 will fit into one canister. Carrying all of the food while hunting from basecamp doesn't seem like a great idea either. Any suggestions for protecting your food while gone from camp above treeline?
    We keep all food in ziploc bags, then put those into a single drawstring duffle before going into the pack. In camp we pull out the duffle, carry it a little ways from camp and pile a few rocks on top. Never a problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    We keep all food in ziploc bags, then put those into a single drawstring duffle before going into the pack. In camp we pull out the duffle, carry it a little ways from camp and pile a few rocks on top. Never a problem.
    Same here. Except we use a lightweight roll top drybag.

    Woody

  6. #6

    Default better!

    Quote Originally Posted by Wa Woody View Post
    Same here. Except we use a lightweight roll top drybag.

    Woody
    That's an even better idea, cuzz it would help seal any possible smells accumulated while opening and closing the ziplocs.

    BTW-

    For longer trips, don't get trapped by the lack of fat in freeze dry. No fat in your diet will wear you down and make you really cold. When on a freeze dry-only trip, we pack butter to "season" the food. Figure on a ration of 1/4 pound of butter (one stick) per person per day. If you don't get around to putting it on your food, you'll end up eating it like a candy bar and relishing every blessed bite!

  7. #7

    Default Vac Pack

    I vacuum pack all my food, and then put it in a dry bag. I've heard bears would still be able to smell it, but I have yet to have a problem. For fat cashews work well.
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

  8. #8

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    I don't know if any of you guys have tried the freezer bag cooking. We do it a lot on camping and hiking trips. The food is really good and you make it yourself so you know what is in it, everything is freeze dried, packs up nicely and all you do is add water, wait a few minutes and eat.
    Here's a link:
    http://www.freezerbagcooking.com/

    I bought the cook book from the lady and it was well worth the dollars spent. My 10 year old son loves it too.

    EDF

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    I have the same book EDF menions & really like it too.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  10. #10

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    I've a big fan of the Millitary style MRE's. Tightly sealed so I imagine little scent gets out. They have all the required nutrients, heat themselves, don't require you to add water and in my opinion taste great.

  11. #11

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    I've a big fan of the Millitary style MRE's. Tightly sealed so I imagine little scent gets out. They have all the required nutrients, heat themselves, don't require you to add water and in my opinion taste great

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    Quote Originally Posted by WIsam View Post
    I've a big fan of the Millitary style MRE's. Tightly sealed so I imagine little scent gets out. They have all the required nutrients, heat themselves, don't require you to add water and in my opinion taste great
    We stash a couple MRE's at our base camp, but don't pack them very far, they're too heavy. Mountain House and some Cup A Noodles for back-backing. I also pack instant rice to add to meals for filler, if I'm really hungry. For fat, I too use mixed nut that are heavy in cashers mixed with dehydrated banana chips, my own blend of Gorp. 'Sheep Hunting Alaska' by Tony Russ is a good book on backpack hunting in Alaska.

    http://www.amazon.com/Sheep-Hunting-...4586472&sr=8-1

    Woody

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    Thumbs up

    I like mountain house products, and I like them even more when adding things to them like brown minute rice, smoked oysters, kippered fish, and sardines. All are great especially when you dump all the olive oil in!

    And of course you've got to have chocolate covered macadamia nuts.

  14. #14

    Default Walmart dry bags

    For some reason I like the rubberized walmart dry bags.(10bucks)
    I use them for shooting and I also have two of them so I can run them into the country.
    I can haul 45 lbs of dry MH or raimen and this is enough to last 14-20 days.
    I haul one to a high pinnacle pass and mark it off with rocks and cover it so there is no residual odors.
    I keep the other with me and then I place it about 100 yards from camp at night under rock beds. They are common where I hunt.
    I don't eat at camp and keep food odors to a minimum.

    Never had bear problems and I generally hunt solo now.

    Sincerely,

    Thomas

  15. #15
    Member KRS's Avatar
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    Excellent ideas guys! I know about taking foil pouches of tuna and chicken... but I never thought of sardines or oysters !!!!!

    I'll do that this fall,

    KRS

  16. #16
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    I've never really worried about fat, but I eat pemmican bars. I think they provide me all the fat I need. The taste gets to some people, but they have something like 450 calories in a 3.75 oz package, and its mainly protein and fat, low carb. Oatmeal for breakfast, 3 pemmican bars during the day, and mountain house at night. Equals just over a pound per day for food, and somewhere between 2500-3000 calories. I'm probably burning 4000-6000, but my lil belly fat layer takes care of the extra calories.

  17. #17

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    Backpacking in alpine country is the most enjoyable hunting there is. The water you drink comes from the stream at your feet and you decide where you want to stop and spend the night - there's always room at the inn of the wildflower basin.

    Mountain House freeze dried dinners in the vacuum compressed meal pouches are the most consistantly flavorful and naturally textured, light weight meals on the market. Instant oatmeal packets, with Milkman brand powdered milk mixed in provides warmth and protein for breakfast. Lipton Cup-A-Soup packets make a nice lunch that will warm both your tummy and your hands when you cradle the bowl in your mitts and sip (cream of chicken, cream of mushroom, split pea, are the most filling). Carry a package of 6 sliced bagels, buttered at home, with pre-sliced cheese slices - seperate the bagel halves with waxed paper so they don't stick together while being scrunched in your backpack - this will tame the craving for bread at lunch - bagels won't crumble. Cocoa packets, Folgers coffee singles, Earl Gray tea packets - a few ounces of brown sugar for the tea - these beverages will make nice warm additions for breaks or mealtime. Keep this stuff in your tent, I never met a bear with a gun -and heaven forbid - if a varmit such as a squirrel or mouse or immature black bear gets into your food and fouls the food when it's out of your control hundreds of feet away, then your backpack hunt is effectively over.

    Every type of stove has boiled the water in the kettle that warmed these meals. All the way from Svea 123, optimus 99, optimus 8R, in the 1970's, to the the weighty, fussy, Nova and MSR gadgets of the 1980's complete with the heavy, red, liter bottles of fuel sloshing around - on hot days I felt like a stinkin gas truck ready to explode - aren't you glad MSR went "international", that means even our enemies have to tinker with those darn things. Then on to numerous canister fuel stoves in the 90's. Finally settled on a Brunton Crux for shorter trips (that's about the coolest little gizmo you've ever seen) and an alcohol stove that weighs maybe an ounce for longer trips.

    A person can carry about 8 days worth of full meals on this diet. Spotting scope & tripod, spare ammo, knives, all of these bulky, additional tools necessary for backpack hunting trips leave only so much room in the pack for food - that extender lid on the pack will be bulged up darn near over your head when you start out. With good fortune - on your return, your food will be used up, your maps will be dry, your face will be wind and sunburned, the load that stretches the seams of your pack and burdens your back and legs will no longer be stuff you bought at the market - rather a pack full of photos, memories, and a tasty trophy you can't buy off the shelf.
    Last edited by Tommy SoHappy; 03-05-2008 at 13:37. Reason: misspelled word

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    anyone try buying the bulk mountain house and seperating it into individual vacuum sealed bags? It looks like it may be a much cheaper way to go.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    anyone try buying the bulk mountain house and seperating it into individual vacuum sealed bags? It looks like it may be a much cheaper way to go.
    I've always thought that you would end up with disproportiant amounts of noodles vs sauce powder.

    KRS

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    Default Enertia trail foods

    Give these meals a try and you won't regret it. www.trailfoods.com I've always been a fan of the lightweight freeze dried mountain house meals. On my last 10 day backpack hunt, my partner brought some enertia trail foods. I found myself bargaining anything I had in my pack for his meals. Superlight, compact, and extremely tasty. We also carried some bulgar wheat and Couscous to add to it. I've since gave away all my freeze dried meals and plan on buying stock in the enertia trail foods

    KB

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