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Thread: Good to eat?

  1. #1
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    Default Good to eat?

    I found this guy on the beach the other day...Anyone ever eat one of these?
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  2. #2

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    DUDE!!!

    Thats some scary stuff!!!!



    Id eat it even though I dont know what it is.

    Im sorry I have no input. I just had to let you know you made me laugh when I opened up the pic.

  3. #3
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    Yeah, he was active...almost climbed right out of the bucket! As you can tell from the pic, I haven't quite refined my technique on catching clams...everyone of the clams, not the cockles, I broke the shell...oh well.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/82493226@N00/2282858415/

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    Default shellfish...

    Be certain the area from where it was harvested is designated as safe.

    I generally will try just about anything. The big surprise was when I ate a huge hermit crab, and that was a real winner...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default If

    If we do not hear from you within one week, we can only assume the worst. :v)

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  6. #6
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Let's see...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.No View Post
    I found this guy on the beach the other day...Anyone ever eat one of these?
    ... you're from Juneau.... if you are a legislator, go ahead and eat it. If you aren't, ask a legislator (or lawyer) to eat it first. let us know how it went.

    seriously, I've eaten snails LIKE that. I tenderized them first with a meat hammer, then fried them like a clam. It was OK.

  7. #7

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    Looks like a Neptunid sea snail. They're common on crab and shrimp pots soaked in deep water, but less so in the shallows. In the shallows you're more likely to run into a similar "furry" version called Fusitriton oregonensis. The latter is known to produce alkiloids in its digestive tract, which can cause nausia or even hallucinations. Get rid of the all the guts though, and it's fine. I'm betting yours came in with a boat that brought it up from deeper water, then dumped it.

    Round numbers, the meat reminds me a whole bunch of conk. Good stuff! Back before the 200 mile limit, the Japanese had a fishery for these and another variety (Buccinum sp) in the Bering Sea, harvesting a couple of thousand tons of meat annually.

    Their method for getting rid of shell and guts was crushing and washing. Works for me, but no machine involved. Just whack them with a hammer and pull off the shell bits and guts before cooking.

  8. #8
    Member Sapper 27's Avatar
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    Default Eeww!

    Looks like something I ate in Iraq. Or something Bear from Man Vs. Wild would eat. Bon Appetite!

    The Sapper

  9. #9
    Member CanCanCase's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.No View Post
    I found this guy on the beach the other day...Anyone ever eat one of these?
    Yep... lightly breaded and fried or sliced and sauteed in butter and garlic. They're great... then again, what ISN'T great lightly breaded and fried or sliced and sauteed in butter and garlic? ;-)

    The analogy above comparing it to conch is dead on. I spent quite a bit of time in the Carribbean, and the locals down there taught me that just about anything that looks like a snail in a shell is good to eat. Be sure to cut off any parts that go outside of the shell and are black or dark colored... you're after the tough WHITE meat between the foot and the far inside tail.

    Agreeing with another post above, be sure the beach or area you picked them up aren't listed as "red tide" or "bad" for shellfish harvest. We get them in the dungie pots if I set them a bit too far from freshwater... I always keep the big ones to fry up with the clams.

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  10. #10
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    Default They Are Great!

    I fished commercially for King and Tanner (Snow) crab in Lynn Canal, Stephens Passage and Chatham during the 70s, 80s and early 90s. We used to get a lot of snail like these while fishing tanner on mud banks. The crew had to shovel a layer of them off the deck in certain areas after we would go through a string of pots. If we were wrapping up a trip and preparing to deliver our crab we would save buckets of the largest snails like the one in the picture for various families in Juneau. (Make sure you pitch the furry versions - they don't taste the same and aren't worth the effort.)

    As I recall, when my friends would divide them all out and get roughly 2/3 of a 5-gallon bucket of them per family - they would blanch them in boiling water, shell them by whacking them with a wooden mallet, remove the visceral ball (guts) and soak them for a couple of hours in salt water. Then they either beat the h*** out of the meat (wrapping it in a dish towel so it wouldn't fly all over the back porch), battered them and pan-fried them OR they ran the meat through a meat grinder and made fritters out of them. I have tried the snail meat fritters and they ARE great!

    There are enough of these in SE for a limited, small vessel commercial fishery - it's just that the project never penciled-out as a money-maker back when I was interested. Brownbear was right on - we kicked the Japanese snail fleet out of the Bering Sea when we took over the fishing rights along U.S. shores out to the 200-mile limit. They were longlining cone pots for them and had quite an operation going with large factory floaters processing the daily production of up to a dozen catcher boats. Its been documented that when the snail areas were closed to foreign entry that a significant number of the snail catcher vessels moved over to the ocean gillnet fishery for salmon under the guise of fishing for squid. Most of you know "the rest of the story" about what this did to the salmon runs returning to Alaskan waters!

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