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Thread: Early season moose hunting question...

  1. #1
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    Default Early season moose hunting question...

    OK, I'm still trying to get moose hunting figured out (hey it's only been 20ish years)
    Basically I'm trying to figure out what habitat is going to be the most productive on the Kenai Pen. during the early bow season.
    Am I going to be better off staying down low in the swamp, pot hole lake, & marsh areas or should I head for the mountains?
    Is one going to be much better than the other during this pre-rut Aug 10-17 season????
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I don't know the Kenai area well, but I can't imagine that it's much different than 14A (Big Lake-Wasilla). I took a spike a few years ago around August 22nd. I hunted low-lying swamp land for two days and typically saw 10-15 moose per day. Only two were bulls - one about 45" with two brow tines and the other a spike - but there were lots of animals and lots of sign. I was pretty convinced that hunting low was the way to go. This year I was up in the high country in the Talkeetna Mountains in mid-August looking for caribou. It was during the bow season for moose, so I was keeping an eye out for them as well. Right at the edge of treeline I spotted a couple of moose in the willows - both bulls. I've been told that the large bulls tend to stay high until the rut. I don't know how true that is, as I've seen plenty of large bulls down low in mid summer. That being said, from very informal observations I tend to see more total animals down in the swamps that time of year, but a larger percentage of the animals up high are bulls.

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    Thanks for the info Brian.
    Sounds like you found it to be kind of a 50/50 thing.
    I talked to one local biologist that told me that most of the bulls would stay low (near water) until rut then head for timberline. Another biologist (same office) told me that wasn't true....
    Maybe they don't have it figured out either
    Makes me not feel quite so dumb.

    Anyone else want to chime in???
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  4. #4
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    Default Moose on the Kenai

    I've only hunted moose on the Kenai one time, so I'm definitely not an expert, but I'll pass along what worked for us. We hunted right at timberline and the nearby low-lying wet areas and didn't see anything until it started to frost at night, then things picked up real fast. One cold frosty morning I called in three bulls, that was exciting. Ted Spraker at the AF&G office in Soldotna, who has since retired, was a great help. Good Luck

    Woody

  5. #5
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    Thanks Woody.

    I will hunt the late season too, but have a partner that can only get the early season off so I'm trying to get it figured out.
    I know Ted but haven't seen him for a few years.
    May have to pick his brain.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  6. #6
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    My experiance in heavily populated ares of people is for big bulls to go high. In the early season in the valley I have found the bigger bulls WAY high. Up almost in the rocks above tree line.

    It's cooler and less bugs and less people. That is my analogy and has worked.

  7. #7

    Default moose

    Several of my co-workers who live in Kenai shoot a moose every year during the bow season. They look at it as a meat hunt. They drive the roads and spot the young spike/ forks that hang around town and the outter areas and let the arrows fly on opening day. A lot of these moose grow up around town and probably spend the first 2 years of their life in a 2 mile square area, dodging bears, cars and bow hunters. It is referred to as the annual "urban moose hunt". A far cry from the legendary "Alaskan Wilderness Hunt" if that is what you are after. It is legal and feeds a lot of families!

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