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Thread: Pack Lists/Contents

  1. #1
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    Default Pack Lists/Contents

    What items do you generally pack on a 3-5 pack in hunt. Ayone got some good detailed list. Item specfic?? (brands....etc) Cleaning up gear for next season and trying to cut weight and come up with a few new items to spend my $$$ on .

  2. #2
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    Although I have a great deal of recommendations, what might be easier is to post your list and we could all help you to edit and save on weight before hunting season.
    I wouldn't want to suggest for you to get a JetBoil if you already have 2 of them.
    ~COtoAK
    Welcome to the boards, by the way. Good job on hopping right in. Ask many questions and this is an excellent way to start!!!
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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default Check Hunting forum section

    Do a search on "Gear for Sheep hunt", you'll get a good idea of what products and brands to use...and if and when you get it all together, stuff it in a Barneys Pack/Frame, and you'll be good to go.

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    Default Here's my gear (Good idea to post it)

    Gear
    Badlands 4500 pack
    Outdoor Research Advanced Bivy
    Slumber Jack O Degree Bag
    Thermarest sleeping pad
    headlamp
    Buck Hunting knife
    Garmin 100 GPS
    Compass
    Alaskan Game bags
    50 foot Nylon parachute cord
    Two cigarette lighters
    Matches
    Scent free deoderant
    Licsense
    Orange ribbon

    Clothing
    Camo
    2 - Smartwool Socks
    UA - Underarmour First layer
    Ball cap
    Cabela's Boots Medlei
    HH Rain gear


    Optics
    Binos Swarovski 10X32's
    Rangefinder - Bushnell
    Canon Digital Rebel - 6.3 Mega pixels
    Bogen-Manfrotto Tripod

    Food
    Nature Valley Granola Bars
    E-mergen-C Powder mix
    MRS Water Filter
    90 oz Hydration bladder
    Various MRE's
    Trail Mix
    Ibuprofen

  5. #5
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default things missing

    I saw you are bringing a manfrotto tripod, are you bringing a spotting scope? or is that just for the camera? ...looks like you have everything covered, except the rifle and a box of ammo.

    Is this a solo hunt? You might want to invest in an Iridium phone just incase...

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    Default I assume...

    From your list I assume that this is a mountain west hunt or that this will be among your first trips to Alaska. I would be reluctant to just take a bivy on an Alaskan hunt, as in most regions and most times of the year the weather can turn sour really quickly. Just a thought. I would also take a bit more that just Ibuprofen for first aid; at least add some duct tape so you could tape a gash closed...

    If you are looking to spend money and cut weight, I would upgrade the Slumberjack bag. I don't know which model you own, but I am sure it is heavy as that is all that they make. Also to cut weight you may wish to forgo the water filter and replace with something like Aqua Mira for such a short hunt. How heavy are the MREs? You may be able to drop some weight there too. If you aren't cooking anything do you really need two lighters and matches...one my suffice.

    Bryan

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    I created a spreadsheet. Got ahold of a digital scale and weighed all my gear, every single item including bullets, socks and skivvies! Then set up a calculation so that if I enter "yes" it adds the item to the total weight. My spreadsheet has more items than I will take on any one hunt. I can pick and choose what items to take and see exactly how much my pack will weigh. This is gear only. Food would be in addition and of course depend on how many days worth. Figure 1.5lbs per day as an average. Between my water bottles and bladder I can carry a gallon of water if I feel I have too. 8lbs right there.

    You would be surprised at the actual weight of your gear compared to the manufacturers listed weight or your own "guesstimate". And all those items that "don't weigh much" add up to a pound or two in a hurry. And remember. A pound or so is a another days worth of food which means another day you can stay in the mountains and look for that ram! Or survive the unexpected.

    I attached it my spreadsheet. You can see my gear and replace it with your own and the weights. This has helped my put it in to perspective.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Member ripnlip's Avatar
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    I am new to the site (and AK), been pretty much just reading everything lately, so I decided to finally reply. Very nice to see everyone so helpful and courteous.

    I found that the dehydrated meals are lighter than MRE's and right now you can get them pretty cheap at Peter Glenn and SAM's club.

    I take matches, lighter, and some cottonballs coated with vaseline and vacuum seal it in a small package and it fits in any pocket. I usually carry one on me and another in the pack.

    Hey Snyd....great idea on the spreadsheet....thanks!!!!

  9. #9
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    Snyd,
    I summed your spreadsheet directly from what you posted and saw that you have 667 ounces of gear. I calculated that out to be approximately 41lbs for your pack? Is this true??? That's amazing if that's true!!!!

    Chas,
    I want to strongly suggest that along with Bryan's idea of bring duct tape that you should consider some super glue for your first aid kit as well. All you have to do is apply it to your laceration, let it set, and it immediately halts exposure and starts the process of healing immediately.

    Something, too, if you could get ahold of them is Outdoor Life has a survival guide and list in the March 2007 issue and Backpacker mag has a skills issue in May 2007 which will also enhance your list issue.

    I think that something you might want to seriously consider is water tablets or a water filter. I didn't see that on your original list.

    Also, what are you doing for food? Do you have Mountain Home or are you planning on living off of E-mergen-C and Nature Valley bars while you are up there? I am asking this because your best bet is to find some serious high carb, light weight food that you could make. When I am out, I use my JetBoil and make either oatmeal or stove top stuffing to help with my carb intake so that I am sure that I have energy.

    How about poles? Are you going to bring poles or waders for creek or river crossings?
    Lurker.

  10. #10
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripnlip View Post
    I am new to the site (and AK), been pretty much just reading everything lately, so I decided to finally reply. Very nice to see everyone so helpful and courteous.
    RipNLip,
    Just jump right in. It's the best way to learn on these boards. You have an immense amount of knowledge from a wide variance of individuals here.
    I'd have to admit, though, it sometimes becomes overwhelming how much I do *not* know about Alaska and it's elements.
    So... hang in there. Ask questions... and welcome to the Outdoors Directory boards!!!
    ~COtoAK
    Lurker.

  11. #11

    Default Pack Weight Spreadsheet.

    Synd,

    Funny you mention about your spreadsheet. I've been working on one up here on the slope for the past few hitches. Granted I didn't individually weigh everything yet and just going off of the manufactuers' weight + 10% on most things, but its starting to give me a ball park. There are still things to add such as utensils and what not. I did add a section to mine where I take the weight of the items I will be sharing with my hunting partner (my bro) and half them and detract that weight from the total as we will be splitting the weight on things like the tripod, tent, stove, fuel, ect. Its still a work in progress, but its getting me there.
    Attached Files Attached Files

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    Default Pack lists

    To all the readers of this post. It's purpose was to get pack discussion and ideas. I'm sure my list generated a few chuckles and giggles from the "hardcore hunters" and rightly so. I may never get out of the lower 48 but I did want to get a few pack ideas. Love the spread sheet list that was a cool idea plus I'm a gear nut and this time of the year is cabin fever time. I figured the best place to get GOOD equipment lists is from the people who use it for real and it HAS to work. So with that said post some lists and bear with the lower 48 rookie.

  13. #13
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    Wink

    Chas,
    It's okay. Actually, I honestly didn't laugh at all this time (if you see other posts... I am pretty sarcastic). I just sincerely believe that safety is first and foremost on a hunting/climbing trip because if you aren't safe, everything else goes out the door, including even being able to eat. There is nothing worse than being so remote and having broken bones and not being able to walk out of it.
    (Look at Michael Strahan's account on the Hunting Forums/Scariest Hunting Experiences) <-- I'll find the thread.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=25872

    In my personal opinion, next major item was water. I didn't see that you had filters or a water tablets, so that kind of concerned me.

    Other than that... in Alaska, you get wet ALOT in August/September! I also hate getting wet all the time and it's terrible being out there with only 2 pairs of wet socks and pruned up feet.

    It's okay on posting this thread. There are other threads that support this one as well mentioned on post #3.

    Where are you from in the Lower 48? It's okay to dream about being able to hunt here in Alaska. My husband had a hunter that came up for the first time and he was 70 years old. It was his final destination for all of his trophy mounts.
    So... it's never too late and you'll never be too old to dream to hunt in Alaska!
    Lurker.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by COtoAK View Post
    Snyd,
    I summed your spreadsheet directly from what you posted and saw that you have 667 ounces of gear. I calculated that out to be approximately 41lbs for your pack? Is this true??? That's amazing if that's true!!!!
    Yup, just over 41 lbs with everything marked "yes" on the list. Including rifle and my walking stick and some clothes I wear and 3 lbs worth of tent. I think that includes a 20oz bottle full of fuel also. Notice I don't have a water filter on their though. All my hunting partners have them so I've never bought one but that would add another lb or so I think for an msr miniworks but last year we didn't even take one. 10 or 12 pounds of food, a bladder full of gatorade and I'm at about 55lbs going in. I think I may ditch the stuff sack for my bag and get one of those gortex 6oz lightweight bivy bags instead. I can put my bag and mummy pad in it and keep from sliding of the pad at night. I can also stuff the bag in it and cram it in my sleeping bag compartment in my pack. I'd rather carry something I can get some use out of. A stuff sack doesn't do much.

    It really pays to weigh each item and put it all on paper so you can trim the ozs. It's amazing how quick they add up. If you guys have never done it I bet your pack weighs more that you think!
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  15. #15
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default thoughts...

    A lighter and more packable sleeping bag may be of use. I have tested and been impressed by Petzl e-light headlamp, MSR Pocket Rocket stove, Mountain House "Pro Pak" meals, ACR Terrafix personal locator beacon, Black Diamond ultralight tents, and genuine 550 paracord.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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