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Thread: Importance of Axle Length

  1. #1
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default Importance of Axle Length

    How important do you find a short axle to axle length to be in hunting Alaska? I'm aware of the trade-offs with regards to forgiveness and portability. I really like the idea of carrying a smaller bow, but I'm not convinced that it is all that important.

    I was at Archer's Den today shooting some new bows - a few Kodiaks and a Diamond. (I'll be back to shoot the Bowtechs later in the week.) Another customer there let me put an arrow through his new Diamond Marquis, and I must say that I was very impressed! That being said, it was certainly the longest bow that I shot today. It's still really light, but just seemed big.

    Any thoughts on how important this feature is when you're looking at buying a bow?

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    Brian,

    I like short bows. They are easier to carry on ATVs, in a bear stand, and crawling around on the tundra. By saying short I mean no longer than 34.
    I also read your other "repost" in reference to the WB or drop away. Here's my thoughts on bows:

    1. I don't care about name brand, but I really like my Pearson Dagger.
    2. Pick one with large diamenter cams and/or wheels. They have less resistance when the string rolls over. This adds to the bow's efficiency.
    3. Stay well within your weight limit.
    4. Accuracy is paramount, that's why I shoot a drop away. Most wrist movement occurs after the release and that is when and where accuracy decreases. With a WB, you are in direct contact with the arrow shaft throughout the entire draw length and release. My QAD only touches the shaft for a few inches. Plus I have ZERO contact on the fletchings and that's what steers the arrow to the target.

    Good luck on your purchase and then your endless pusuit of perfection while flingin' them arrows!

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    Member AK145's Avatar
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    I sacrifice a few FPS for a more forgiving bow, thus I like a longer axel to axel bow and have never owned a really short bow. I think my Ultratec is 38" (forgot exactly). I've never had any problems in the field with the longer bows, which of course have been around a lot longer than the real short bows.

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Some of us are bigger than others

    It depends on if you are a finger shooter or a release shooter. A finger shooter will probably find a 38-42" A-A length more comfortable on the fingers. A release shooter can be shorter. Myself, I like a good length riser so mine are longer even thought these days I am shooting a release. I have one BowTech that is 40" and one that is 41"

    I think you will find also that a longer bow is more forgiving and easier to shoot. Short bows are more critical. For sheep and goat hunting though, where I might be packing it in, I would opt for a shorter bow.

    I am totally sold on BowTechs. Probably why I have two, setup almost identical to each other.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    It's so interesting how definitions of "long" and "short" have changed over time with regards to bows. (Much like how "smooth" a bow is, what qualifies as "fast", etc.) The Diamond bow that I considered to be a bit on the long side yesterday (The Diamond Marquis) is 34.5" from axle to axle. Not very long, eh? Compared side by side to other bows in the 32-34" range , it still seemed bigger. Still, I guess that's not too big. I know that everything is a compromise. I'll certainly be using my new bow for sheep and goats, but also for moose, caribou, and bear. I want accuracy above all else, but smooth shooting and decent speeds are nice as well.

    I know, I know...buy the bow that feels best to me. I'll do that, but I just wanted some feedback on the importance of length to other hunters. I've only shot one arrrow out of the Marquis so far, and have yet to shoot any of Bowtech's dual cam bows, but so far I was really impressed with the Marquis. Comparing it to other bows it seems a bit on the long side, but it sure did shoot nicely.

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    My first bow, a Hoyt Pro-Force extreme is 41" A to A, while my newer bow, the Hoyt Havoc is 33.5 A to A. I find the older Hoyt to be more forgiving, but only in part due to the length. The other consideration is the shape of the riser and whether it is deflex or reflex in relationship to the pivot point of the limbs (if that makes sense?).
    I don't have a scale to weigh them both but there can't be much of a difference. As far as length, the longer bow never bothered me, and the shorter bow I have never noticed an advantage.
    The Havoc is faster, quieter, smoother, and has less vibration. With that said, I still like the old bow too. She just feels good.
    We all encourage good technique and lots of practice, but your reality might be different than mine/ours. With that said, realize your limitations and strengths and take those into account when choosing a bow.
    Wonder what BS Monkey has to say about all of this? Where or where can he be?

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    Default One more thing

    You here alot about less weight too. My bow is right at 4 lbs and my brother's bow is the light weight 31" Parker at about 2.5 lbs. I much prefer a little more weight. It really helps me steady the bow. I know you can get more weight by adding a heavy stabilizer and quiver, but then there's more crap hanging off and possibly rattling during the shot.

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Fingers shooters you want to go with a longer axle to axle like dave said 38-42' is good.

    release shooters can go with any bow long or short.

    Forgiveness now we get into the brace height. anything uner 7' is not as forgiving.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
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    Anchorage, AK

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I guess I should have specified that I use a release.

  10. #10
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    I shoot a release. But I shot a bow with a long axle to axle and love it. Don't get caught up in speed kills. Accuracy kills.





    Prefer a longer bow? The 38 in. Q2XL will deliver.

    Introduced 2000
    Discontinued 2004

    IBO Rating 308 fps Cam(s) StraightLine MaxCam2 Draw Weight 40, 50, 60, 70 lbs. Draw Length 24-31 in. Half-Sizes 27.5-30.5 in. Axle to Axle Length 38 in. Brace Height 7 1/2 in. Riser Length 27 in. Physical Weight 4.3 lbs. Letoff 70%** String/Cable Length String 97 3/4" Cable 40 3/16"
    String 99 1/8" Cable 40 1/2"
    (30 1/2" & 31" Draw)
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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    I don't believe the Diamond has sealed bearings, you may want to consider that. Brace height is the real denominator as far as speed and accuracy go. A bow with a longer brace height means less time for the shaft on the string, or more forgiving, having said that bows with short brace heights, 7 to 7.5 stay on the string longer and absorb more of the bows energy, giving you more speed, but also more chance for error. In todays archery world you can find relativly short bows that offer longer brace heights, really the best of both worlds. As far as dropaways go, if you have a chance take a look at the schaffer dropaway, after the release there is only contact with 6 inches of the shaft, then total clearence, also it is built like a tank. You shoot it cock feather up.

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