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Thread: best handgun for daughter

  1. #1
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    Default best handgun for daughter

    Daughter wants a handgun for her birthday. She will be turning 16 so what do you think I shoud get her? How about lessons in Palmer?

    Troy

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    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default Without knowing her tastes and capabilities...

    I'd have to say put a note in her birthday card that says she has $X dollars set aside for a handgun, then make it a Daddy/Daughter day and take her shopping.
    I bought several handguns based on what I thought my wife's tastes were, and all were duds. She came into the store the other day, to pick me up for lunch, and spotted one that caught her interest. She looked it over, racked the slide a few times, held it up in firing position a few times, laid it on the counter and started looking for a holster, rug, and ammunition. Made her a deal, and paid for the thing. She's happy as a pup with two tails!
    Might think it over for a bit.
    As to training in Palmer, can't help you a bit there.

  3. #3
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    Default CF or 22?

    What guns has she shot? What caliber is she up to now? Can she cycle the slide of the various semi-autos? Will her hands fit a K frame RB? Is she right or left eyed? Is a 22 of some kind shot routinely now? Does her skill level indicate she is ready for 38? Will this be the first handgun she has shot?

    Even if she goes to pick it out based on what ever little girls consider, with no experience shooting handguns, it will probably be a bad choice.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Default thanks for the input

    Thanks for the input so far. She is new to shooting and has not shot a handgun.

    If I understand you correctly "Murphy" I should use baby steps on getting her this handgun. Start with a 22 pistol then after she is ready move up to a 38. Sounds like a good idea to me!

    Say I agree with a 22, which one would be the best? I would prefer to purchase one that I/she will keep so I don't mind spending the money. I would be looking at no more than $700. Any ideas?

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Default

    No need to spend $700 on a good quality .22 unless you really want to. The Ruger Mark series are great weapons as well as the Browning Buckmark series (both from $200-300). Smith and Sig are both making nice compact .22s now that have a really good feel but shorter barrels. I'd haul her down to Boondocks, Sportsmans Warehouse, etc... and have a "shopping day" with dad. Let her handle them and see what feels right to her.

    I think you are on the right track to stick with a .22. They are inexpensive to shoot and basically no recoil to deal with. She can learn a lot about handgunning and develop good habits with one and then move up to something more substantial.
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    I will assume that either you or some other qualified instructor will start correctly. The 22 is always the best first gun to shoot and at 16 she may graduate to something centerfire very quickly. She would probably enjoy a formal class, perhaps an all female class. I've conducted several of them with teenagers and adults with good interaction.

    I think if a person is not "biased" against centerfires by loose lipped, though well intending, tip givers who spout out words like "kick" and "recoil' they generally do very well with 38 WC loads or even 9mm if not in a small gun. My kids and grand kids have shot 38 spcl and 9mm by the age of 7 and it is no different than the 22, just sights and trigger. My 8 year old grandson shot a cylinder full of 38 spcls (M19 2 1/2") into a 2" group at 25 feet with just wrist support, here at the Fairbanks range last summer. This wasn't his first handgun shoot but first centerfire.

    It is difficult for any new handgun student to learn good muzzle control in just one or two brief sessions. The instructor must stand close and be supportive. Generally this is very similar to a parent teaching a 16 year old to drive....it rarely goes well. To be honest I'd much rather teach a six year old than a 16 year old, regardless of gender though the girls are usually more receptive and take to the gun well.

    Back to the gun. Semi auto or revolver makes little difference as the slide is so easy to cycle on 22's. Auto loaders seem to provoke more fun shooting or ammo wasting or noise making with very little aiming. Keep in mind that manipulation of the slide and magazine in and out will often cause the muzzle to wander in to forbidden territory. A revolver is not so much of a concern. Both still require stepping the right foot back to keep the muzzle down range. I never train a youngster with the safety other than to say it is between their ears. We don't use it at range sessions, The action open with magazine and all ammo out is clear. Loaded and ready is ammo in, action closed, trigger finger straight, outside the trigger guard, pointed down range (either lowered to bench or held pointed). Shooting is sights on target, then finger inside the trigger guard, then squeeze only when the sights are right. There is an NRA course of fire that starts with ten shots in a paper plate (no aiming dot) from 15 feet, resting the wrist on sand bags. Shoot this ten times, two handed. When all 100 shots are 2" group, we move on. Shoot ten then put a new plate on top, then check the bottom after 100 rounds. That is a days shoot. Remember the focus must be on the front sight throughout the squeeze. I would shoot a few plates with the utmost of concentration then take a break and plink pop cans or clays for funzies. It has got to be fun but the plinking is like a reward for good practice. Just like with any endeavor, work at to get better, plink for fun.

    I still think the Ruger 22 semiauto pistol is one of the very best guns to learn to shoot. The newer ones now lock open after the last shot which is a good thing. Operation is easy, the grip angle points naturally and seems to fit small hands, and the short barrel model is easy to hold on target. Revolvers are simple but some models don't fit all hands well.

    This could be one of the very best parent/kid times. Bonding, I guess, would be Dr. Phil's word but making it productive is important. Kids want to be good at it. They make the very best students.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  7. #7

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    I agree with the idea that she should try out a few first before buying; my girlfriend took a safety course that included practice with a number of automatics and revolvers, and she liked the revolvers best. I'm guessing the grips were more comfortable for her small hands. Dunno. Since then, the only gun I've seen spark her interest was a pink one from Charter Arms.

    I can't help with any gun course recommendations in your area... proper, safe gun training is important enough that you might think about making a vacation about it: pick a place that "happens" to have a comprehensive class and schedule a vacation there during their next class.

  8. #8
    Member stump.58's Avatar
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    Default

    I got my Son (16) a walthers P-22 What a hoot to shoot. he's hooked.

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    Member tyrex13's Avatar
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    Default

    Walther P22 would be my choice. It will get her started with a .22 that functions just like most centerfire autoloaders. It will be something she could CCW when she is old enough, target practice for cheap with, or hunt stoopid chickens and rabbits with.

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