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Thread: "Alaska Standards"

  1. #1

    Default "Alaska Standards"

    Ive heard people say some boots are not up to "Alaska Standards". My wife and I are going to fly into CoghillLake in the PWS area and want to be prepared as possible. With no trails to speak of and what looks like a pretty wet glacial valley, can anyone give me the best boot for the job? Were plan on hiking to the nearest glacier, 4-5 miles, across what looks like a fairly open, but possibly wet valley.

    Affordability is key, but I know what kind of discomfort would come from having less than capable footwear.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Default

    Hip waders

  3. #3
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    A book recommendation:
    Alaska: A Climbing Guide
    Michael Wood and Colby Coombs
    On page 21, they start to mention the ways that difficulty is rated:
    *route
    *difficulty
    *elevation gain
    *average time
    *maps
    *resources
    *history
    *approach
    *route description
    *descent
    On page 23, the difficulty ratings are explained in detail.
    There are 6 grades, according to this book. + are a tad more difficult.

    Don't worry. I am not used to this.. I am used to a different grade and classification for mountain climbing. Like this: Grade I, Class 3, 5.6 miles, 3k vert. That's english to me.

    Does any of make sense?

    Ah... boot standards.
    I say... water repellant.
    Lurker.

  4. #4

    Default

    Alaska standards... that's a new one on me. A lot of loggers used to use "corkers", but I don't know if that's a generic term or a specific brand. They're rubber boots with steel or tungsten spikes on the bottom, and they help a lot when hiking through wet, slippery areas. For vegetation they're a lot better than rubber soles, but they only perform equally as well with rubber if you're walking over dry rock. They slip on metal, and they have no ankle support to speak of, but they're very good at what they do. I figure if they're good enough for professionals who are in the woods all day, they're good enough for serious terrain.

    Other than that, I've only used run-of-the-mill hiking boots with a gore-tex layer. That and a pair of sandals for crossing creeks. I have no idea what people use for glacier hikes.

  5. #5
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    Default Boots

    I am sure you will want hip boots for getting in and out of the float plane and for fishing. What most people up here wear are extra-tuff rubber boots or something similar for most outings. There is alot of wet marshy ground in the summer time here. Thats what I would wear and maybe a pair of slip-on shoes around the cabin.

    Extra-tuffs are the Alaska Standard.

  6. #6

    Default Rubber boots

    Are there rubber boots comfortable enough for hiking in? Im looking for something both waterproof and confortable. Ive never owned a pair of rubber boots that were not extremely cumbersome.

    Thanks for your help in advance

  7. #7
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Default

    The Extra-tuffs are not a bad boot to hike in, not as tight as a hiking boot but much better than the normal rubber boot, but I think you will need hip waders. Last year I hiked 9 miles on a hike into a float trip in waist waders, breathables with some good boots, comfortable but in June and July they could be a little warm.

  8. #8
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    Check out a pair of Muck Boots. They're pretty comfortable to hike in.

    http://www.muckbootsonline.com/Outdo..._Boots_s/2.htm
    The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, the filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any group of animals I have ever seen. Thank God for the United States Marine Corps! (Eleanor Roosevelt, 1945)

  9. #9

    Default

    thank you. very valuable info.

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