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Thread: Which 45-70 marlin

  1. #1
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    Default Which 45-70 marlin

    Hi Everyone
    New to site ,and from Vancouver Island ,BC
    I've been thinking of buying a new rifle, the marlin 1895 45-70 with the 22 inch barrel.
    Topping it off with see through mounts and a 1.5 x 5 scope.
    Was told to get 22 barrel, better vol and accuracy, than 18.5 guide model.
    Max 250 yrd shots. Which model would you buy.

  2. #2
    Member Unalakleet yooper's Avatar
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    I have a blued guide gun with a wood stock with a VXIII 1.5-5x20 heavy duplex scope. When I am doing my part, I can make the bullet holes touch at 75 yards using some of my reloads and some of the Garrett ammo. To me, that is pleanty accurate. I have my scope mounted as low as possible and if iron sights are an option, I would use a quick detach mounting system. I am not a fan of see-through mounts, but that is my preference. I have been considering a stainless model with ghost ring sights, its on my wish list.

  3. #3

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    The Guide Gun is great, but for the full potential of a .45-70, the 22 incher is much better. The GG is very easy to pack and is very handy, but it also gives up a bit in the velocity department. The .45-70 has a rainbow trajectory as it is, and any loss there is not in the best interest.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

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    I've not seen any difference in the accuracy of the guide gun vs the 22 inch tube. Velocity? Yes. Accuracy? My GG will cut clover leaves at 100 yards with a couple different loadings. Even with the loss of velocity, I'd still go with the guide gun for where I live and hunt, due to the thick brush I often find myself in. If where you hunt doesn't get that thick, then the longer tube would give you a bit more velocity.
    I've looked at the see through mounts, and on the Marlin it just doesn't feel right to me. It puts my head at a wierd angle, I have no cheeck weld and I really can't use the iron sights all that well through them anyway with a 40mm objective dangling down in the way. I went with Warne QD rings instead. I've tried the rifle with a red dot - worked great and I might put an aimpoint on it again in the future, as they continue to improve reliability and battery life. I'm wondering how the thing would work with the 3x aimpoint swing to the side gizmo that all the AR mall ninjas are using...
    Other items to consider - (lord knows I'm considering them for the upcoming year)... a saddle ring to attach a single point sling (for the ultimate tacti-cool 45/70), a Wild West trigger (or a good trigger job), and fer gawds sake get yourselve a couple of extra front sight hoods

  5. #5
    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    I have the blued guide gun and find it about perfect for a compact and easy to carry go-too gun. I don’t have a scope mounted and never will as it well suited to my style of use with the open sights. Accuracy seems good and compared to the 22” barrel velocity loss is not nearly as bad as you would think. My hand loads with 426 gr hard cast bullets leave the short tube at over 2000 fps. Just how much faster than that do you need your bullets to go?
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

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    Default .45-70 Cowboy

    A little extra velocity and mine is a straight shooter , it really lays out nice with a full magazine tube . Resist the fad for short barrels , like somebody says here " half the people you know are below average " . Alot of people watch T.V. .

  7. #7
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Depends...

    Depends on what you want it for. I got the stainless 18.5" guide gun for float trips in NW Alaska. I sent it to www.stevesgunz.com for an action job and one piece firing pin. It is smooth as butter now. Best $75 I ever spent. I slimmed the forearm about 1/4", sanded the butt stock, and coated with black spray on truck bed liner. Just took a good sanding job and about 6-7 super light coats with some drying time in between. Tough as nails and looks great. Got $18 in the stock refinish. Two years and not one single chip/scratch. That is after over 30 days on Alaska float trips. Bouncing around in my Ally pack canoe, lying on gravel river bars, falling from the side of the camp chair, you name it. I don't baby this gun. That is not what it was built for. I got XS ghost ring sights on it and load with Buffalo Bore. I can echo the response from earlier in saying mine is dead on accurate to 100 yards. Since I need it to be dead on at 20 yards, that is more than enough. Minute of bear, and then some. For bear protection on float trips it is the perfect gun. I built mine around my needs. I suggest you do the same.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  8. #8

    Default .45-70

    Danattherock hit it perfectly; it depends on what you want it for. If you are looking to use it for hunting and are not too concerned about packability, by all means go for the longer tube. I have a GG because I wanted a shorter thumper to pack on my 4-wheeler, boat and around camp. I grab my regular .45-70 when that is not a consideration every time. I also found the shorter version really isn't THAT much easier to pack, so I find myself leaving it in the safe more and more when I want to use one of my .45-70's.

    I don't have scopes on either of these. There is no need for the distance these are best suited for.

    Both of mine are extremely accurate at 100 yards. I reload with 400 grain Kodiak bullets or use Buffalo ammo. These are beast stoppers in the extreme IF used within their abilities. These are not guns to try to pop a sheep at 400 yards, although IF you are lucky and do connect, it will be a dead sheep. The problem with these old calibers is they are close-in rounds for big game, usually within 150 yards, and as I said before, their trajectory is pretty extreme. If you sight it in for 100 yards, it will be a easy to hold on and hit anything out to roughly 150 yards. Too much farther and you really have to hold over much more than the like of a .270 or such. The bullets have a fast rate of drop at the weights and velocities a .45-70 can push them.

    If you want to push this caliber to .458 Min Mag performance, your best bet is to get one in that caliber. I personally love the .45-70 and see no reason to push it beyond it's limits as some attempt to.

    Also, if you reload or buy "hot" rounds for your Marlin, be aware that there 3 distinct loading sets of criteria. One is for the original trap-door style rifles, the second is for modern rifles in the Marlin 1895 class and the third is for very strong actions, such as the Browning 1885, Ruger #1, Siamese Mauser conversions, etc. This third loading is very high pressure and can cause a Marlin to get damaged. They will blow up an original trapdoor type. Be careful.

    Most of all, get what you are looking to use it for and enjoy this old thumper. You will be quite impressed with what it does on game, and is all out of proportion with it's paper ballistics.

    One last thig. Remington and a couple of other ammo makers market a hollowpoint bullet for this caliber. DO NOT even think of using these on a moose or bear sized critter. They suck and will not penetrate worth a hoot, and will break up on impact. I shot a whitetail deer in Arkansas a few years back with one, and the performance on this size of an animal convinced me right there that these are not to be used for something that can shoot back.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  9. #9

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    I've got both a Guide Gun and a standard 1895. The GG is handy, but I don't like it for a hunting gun. Rather than a scope, I have receiver sights on both. One big difference for me is the straight grip on the GG. I hate it!

  10. #10
    Member tyrex13's Avatar
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    Default

    The only accuracy gained with the longer barrel would be the longer sight radius, but since you're going optics, I'd get the SS guide model.

  11. #11
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default Marlin forum...

    There is a great website for Marlin owners that has tons of info on all lever action models. Take a look at the forum from the link below. About 10-12 post down, there is one titled "45-70 pics". There are over 200 responses there alone. This forum should give you all the information you need to pick out which lever is right for you. This is also where I found out about how to refinish the stock with spray on truck bed liner. Great site.

    http://www.marlinowners.com/board/vi...83f6a72387cab5
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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