Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26

Thread: Game bags

  1. #1

    Default Game bags

    Tell me about the best game bags to get for my upcoming moose hunt, i.e., Alaska Game Bags, T.A.G. bags, etc.

    What should we get?

  2. #2
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    3,163

    Default I make my own....

    out of old style mattress covers. They are much more durable than most of the retail bags and I can make whatever size I like.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,927

    Default

    IMO the TAG bags, if you can still get them from Wiggy's Alaska or Pristine Ventures. I have used the Alaska Game bags with great success on a number of caribou trips. Don't use the cheap bags, you will regret it.

  4. #4

    Default

    T.A.G. bags.

  5. #5
    Member blackcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sterling
    Posts
    70

    Default i love mine

    Alaska Game Bags have had 5 moose a bear and several deer in mine have had them for 7 years. great bags.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    162

    Default

    what is the best size and number of them for a Moose and a Caribou?

  7. #7

  8. #8
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,648

    Default Alaska Mill and Feed

    Romo,

    I've been using regular cotton game bags for years, and have always had great results with them. They're tough, hard to tear, and last many years. On the downside, they're heavy and bulky. I get mine in Anchorage from Alaska Mill and Feed, but you can get them elsewhere too. Some time ago I used to use the so-called ďelk quarter bagsĒ and found them to be satisfactory. Hereís how many bags I use, and why:

    1. Large bags, 7 each. I use one for each quarter, and two for the ribs, which I leave on the bone. The last bag is for the cape. You donít HAVE to use a game bag for this, but it keeps it contained, and you donít get hair all over everything that way. I donít know the dimensions on these bags, but they just fit on a front shoulder of a moose, on the bone. Moose shoulders are the longest quarter youíll have, and come in somewhere around 48Ē long. This is a major consideration with some bags, that are just too small to reach all the way up.

    2. Small bags, 3 each. One for the prime cuts (backstraps and tenderloins), one for the neck (which can weigh over 40# and be quite bulky), and one for trim (brisket, etc.). If you eat any of the organs, you might want a separate bag for those. The liver on a moose is, like everything else, quite large.

    ALASKA GAME BAGS

    I have used the Alaska Game Bags and was not impressed. The material is porous enough that fly eggs can get through. It is also fairly fragile and can tear or snag on brush pretty easily. Furthermore, it is stretchy and clings to the meat, where I prefer a bag that hangs loosely and doesn't stick to the meat. The best thing these bags have going for them is that they come in a kit that purports to have enough bags for an entire animal. They're much less bulky than cotton bags.

    TAG BAGS

    I have a set of the TAG bags and may try them this fall. They're expensive though, at $65 for a set of seven bags. Here's what I see with these bags so far:

    1. You get six bags that by my measurement (I measured them as I wrote this) are 27"x59", plus the "backstrap bag" that is being offered currently. This bag may accommodate a couple of moose backstraps, but it seems a bit on the small side to me. I haven't measured a moose backstrap lately, but, depending on how far up the shoulder you cut it, and how far into the hindquarter you go, it could be upwards of 4' long. Each one is about 10" around or so; they're quite large. So... with a total of seven bags, I can use one for each quarter, plus one for each slab of ribs (I leave them on the bone), plus a tight fit on that seventh bag for my backstraps. I'm out of room, and I still haven't dealt with the tenderloins (I keep them in the same sack with my backstraps), the neck (at least 40#), trim, and the cape. Iíd like to see a couple of mid-sized bags in this set, of say, 27Ēx30Ē or so. Iíd also like to see a bag for the cape.

    2. The material is synthetic, and I donít believe it will absorb blood. This could be a plus or a minus, depending on the situation. Being non absorbent, a case could be made that the bags will stay drier in the field. Wet game bags are a liability and can facilitate bacterial growth on the surface of the meat. I havenít had a lot of trouble with this with cotton bags, but Iím really protective of my bags. I keep my cotton bags in a dry bag on float trips, or put them in a trash bag and carry them in my pack. I always tarp my meat pole and tarp my meat on the boat on float hunts. Still, it could be a valid point. The non-absorbency of the material could be a liability though. Cotton bags blot surface moisture as soon as you put the meat in them, which hastens the drying of the surface of the meat. Yes, the material absorbs blood (cotton bags), which is food for bacteria, but this dries and doesnít seem to be a problem as long as you are taking precautions.

    3. The material is very light and compact; it feels like silk parachute material. On the plus side, they take up little room. Cotton bags take up at least four or five times the space. This is perhaps the greatest asset these bags offer, and is especially important on pack-out hunts. The material looks flimsy, but that might be a false impression. I donít know how tough they are. Are they snag-resistant, or will they rip apart in the brush? I donít know.

    So, in summary, I havenít made my mind up about TAG bags yet. As I said, I may try them this fall. These are just my first impressions of them. It would be hard to switch from cotton, though, which has served me so well for so many years. I have bags in the shed that I've used for more than fifteen years, with no problems. Would I be able to provide a better assessment after only one season of use? I don't know. Do I want to abandon my cotton bags for several seasons to experiment with TAG bags? I'm not sure yet. I'll probably bring both.

    Hopefully this helps!

    Best Regards,

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    117

    Default TAG bags

    Good morning Romo.

    Check out Larry Bartlett's test results about TAG bags at: http://www.pristineventures.com/big-game-bags.html

    You can also see the bags in action if you watch Larry's latest float hunt DVD.

    After reading Larry's test result, I purchased a set to try out. As with Mike, I will be trying out the bag for the first time this fall. The most attractive attribute for me is the weight difference.

    Regards,

    yhc

  10. #10

    Default

    Mike -- Am I correct in presuming that your position on Alaska Game Bags have changed? See link http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/akf...nting/6077.htm

    I'm not trying to stir the pot, I'm just looking to get the best game bags to preserve my trophy, which, for me, is not only the horns but the meat. That being the case, are the bags at Alaska Mill & Feed the heavy duty cotton bags?

  11. #11
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,648

    Default Changed my mind

    Quote Originally Posted by Romo
    Mike -- Am I correct in presuming that your position on Alaska Game Bags have changed? See link http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/akf...nting/6077.htm

    I'm not trying to stir the pot, I'm just looking to get the best game bags to preserve my trophy, which, for me, is not only the horns but the meat. That being the case, are the bags at Alaska Mill & Feed the heavy duty cotton bags?
    Romo,

    No offense taken at all. Yes, I have re-considered my position. While the Alaska Game Bags are certainly less bulky than regular game bags, the possibility of fly eggs getting through, combined with the fact that they cling to the meat puts them in at least second place behind traditional cotton bags, in my opinion. I prefer a loose bag that doesn't adhere to the meat.

    Having said that, I realize that chunks of meat without bone inside, such as the backstraps, tenderloins, neck and trim, will sit in the bottom of a game bag and probably stick to it. You're going to get that with any bag, and there's not a lot you can do about it (besides some tricks in suspending the backstraps).

    I guess this shows that even strong opinions can change!

    Regards,

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,927

    Default

    One thing I noticed about the Alaska Game Bags. I bought mine at Mountain View Sports here in Anchorage. My hunt buddy bought his from Cabela's. The packaging was the same, the bags were not. His seemed to have a wider weave then the ones I bought. The difference was pretty obvious to the eye and touch. I don't know why there would have been a difference. I usually treat mine with citrus mix and have only had a minor problem with flies that was more my fault then the bags.

  13. #13

    Default

    Mike --

    Is there only one brand of game bag at Alaska Mill & Feed or is there a specific brand to request?

  14. #14
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,648

    Default I'm not sure

    Quote Originally Posted by Romo
    Mike --

    Is there only one brand of game bag at Alaska Mill & Feed or is there a specific brand to request?
    Romo,

    The bags at Mill and Feed come in bulk, without a name on them. All you have to do is call them and ask for their heavy cotton game bags; they'll know what you're talking about. I don't think they carry any others (at least they didn't last time I checked). They're available in two sizes. For a moose, go with the counts I mentioned earlier.

    Hope this helps.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  15. #15

    Default Military Mattress Covers

    I have to agree that the cotton military mattress covers have worked great on two moose I've taken.

  16. #16
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2

    Default

    I just bought bags (10 oz. cotton duck) from Lyle Enterprises, Coeur d"Alene, ID. The web-site is: www.huntergamebags.com. The bags look absolutely terrific.

  17. #17
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Long Island NY
    Posts
    123

    Default

    Hey Terry where does one aquire those covers and how many did you get?

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Your old discarded pillow case covers. Have your wifey sew a draw string into the top. Either that or have someone pick you up the laundry bags they sell on the base.

  19. #19

    Default

    Wildone -- have her sew my game bags too!
    "The days a man spends fishing or spends hunting should not be deducted from the time he's on earth. " Theodore Roosevelt

  20. #20
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Long Island NY
    Posts
    123

    Unhappy no chance

    you don't want to hear where she told me to go........

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •