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Thread: Dr. Len Ferucci Dogs

  1. #1

    Default Dr. Len Ferucci Dogs

    Hey guys,

    I am new to the forum and hope I am in the right place. I am looking for a retriever pup. Growing up in Alaska, my father and I had the pleasure of having two excellent hunting and family dogs, Doc and Token. Both of these dogs were bred by Dr. Len Ferruci. Unfortunately, Dr. Ferucci is no longer breeding dogs and I was wondering if someone is continuing this line. I know this is pretty unlikely but thought it would not hurt to ask.

    That being said, I am looking for a new hunting dog. I am not looking for some champion field dog - just a small black female pup with a good nose and disposition. I would like to find an Alaskan dog. But do not really want to gamble and get one from the paper. It has been seven long years and I am finally ready to be able to give a dog the proper home, time and attention needed for training. Anyone have any good advice for me?

    Thanks,

    SMK

  2. #2
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    Default the lines

    His dogs, or at least one, go back to Bob Tarnowski (FAI). Bob bred his dog Misti (Rays Rascal v. Sirion Super Snooper) to Super Powder. That is how he got the name Chena in his lines. That breeding produced the likes of Chena River Big Mac and Climie Flenaugh's dog Kenai. Can't right now think of Len's dogs name. Might have been Pap, not sure though.
    They were all big, roman nosed, houndy, hard charging dogs. Huge hearts, huge athletic ability, smart, and yes, devious to boot. Some of the most fun I had was running Kenai in field trials. Wow did he ever have style.
    Those dogs were not for the faint of heart average Joe fresh out of grade school type trainers. They were high powered. And does that ever bring back memories.
    Can't help you now with a breeding. I may be looking for a new black bundle of joy come springtime, but have not started the quest yet. Best of luck.

  3. #3

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    The last time a remember Len running I think was 2004.
    The following are AKC retriever clubs you can make some contacts there.
    www.retrieverclubofalaska.com
    www.alaskaworkingretriever.com
    I'm sure some folks that ran with Len will know of those lines.
    I'll ask around also.

  4. #4
    Member 3CBRS's Avatar
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    Wetland Retrievers is right about contact RCA or AWRC. Howard N. probably knows if anyone locally is continuing the same line & his contact info is on AWRC's website.

    Some of the last dogs Len bred, trained & ran in trials were: FC AFC Chena River Ripple (115 derby points/all time high pt. derby dog), FC AFC Chena River Tug (99 derby points, 1996 high pt. Amateur FT), CAFC FC AFC Chena River Chavez, CNFC CAFC FC AFC Chena River No Surprise (Chica), FC AFC Chena River Surprise (Chena), and FC AFC Yasser Leroy. That's the ones I remember & think he had AFC Super Khomeini from the Super Powder x FC AFC Chena River Misty breeding.

    Karen

  5. #5

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    Good morning everyone,

    First of all I would to thank everyone for their help and prompt response. I thought that I would not have much of a chance of finding a dog with the same blood line but it seems there are a couple of possibilites. I am amazed at how the lineage of the dogs are so well documented. I know that must take a lot of work and for those of you that do it, I just wanted to thank you.

    Anyway I need to do some more research. I have to find my father's paperwork on Doc and Token and see if can get as direct connection as possible. I am excited in the possibility of having generations of this line in the family.

    I do have some questions though. If a dog at the young age of seven weeks air shipped to Alaska, is it safe for the animal? Could there be any long term effects on the dog. I have been on planes where you could hear dogs yelping and crying down in stowage and felt horrible for them. Would it be best to fly down to the kennel and pick the animal up?

    Thanks again for all the help.

    SMK

  6. #6
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    Default the lines

    Yep, Super Khomeni was the MistyxSuper Powder dog Len had. Full brother to Chena River Big Mac, Bob's dog. Thinking way back there were 2 of the same breedings, neither of which produced very many pups. Chena River Surprise was one of 2 or 3 pups whelped on the field trial grounds while Len was running the dam, hence the name "SURPRISE". As I recall he was clueless that either she was pregnant or due to whelp and continued to run her between pups. And he was a OBGYN? And had a dog named Pap after the pap smear. Hmm. And Yasser Leroy was a stab at ole Roy Mcfall. Lots of history there. I miss some of the athletes (dogs) but none of the politics.
    Providing that line of dogs is physically and genetically sound (and I have no reason to believe otherwise) you should have lots of fun with another pup.

  7. #7
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARRCDSPR View Post
    I do have some questions though. If a dog at the young age of seven weeks air shipped to Alaska, is it safe for the animal? Could there be any long term effects on the dog. I have been on planes where you could hear dogs yelping and crying down in stowage and felt horrible for them. Would it be best to fly down to the kennel and pick the animal up?
    I bought my Golden from a breeder in Oregon last year. This breeder ships dogs all over the country and has been doing so for some 20 years. She told me they've never had any reported issues with air travel and dogs. My pup was actually about 3 months old when I picked him up and flew him back up.

    Here are some travel tips that were shared with me by the breeder:

    Get a direct flight to get the travel over with quickly and avoid the ground delays that occur at layovers. Use the red eye flights (especially during the summer) as they occur during cooler night temperatures, thereby avoiding heat exposure. Night travel should also coincide with the dog's sleep time, so they are more apt to be tired and just sleep through the ordeal. Use a kennel that has lots of extra room, durable padding, nothing the dog can hurt themselves on, and good ventilation. I actually installed a battery powered fan on our kennel for the trip from Portland in July. It was still running on it's 2 battery power supply 5 hours later in Anchorage and the pup was really happy to see me.

    The pup proceeded to sleep for the entire 3 hour drive to my house with no ill effects of the travel after that. He wasn't scared of the travel kennel or going for rides in a vehicle after that. In fact, he still loves to be in his kennel. So, I've seen nothing bad about air travel with my boy.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  8. #8
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    I have a buddy that hunts with Len regularly. If you think it would help I can ask him to ask Len about it.

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