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Thread: Recommendations For Halibut Charter Boat

  1. #1
    Member GWHunter's Avatar
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    Question Recommendations For Halibut Charter Boat

    I am looking at purchasing a boat for a halibut charter (I know another darn charter). I am looking for a six pack and made from alum. I have researched many different manufactures and thought I would weigh what the 'experts' here have to say. I know about a year ago I saw something similiar on boats just for halibut fishing but can't find the thread any more.

    I am all ears to hear the recommendations....no I am not going to charter until I get two years of boat use under my belt and I have already completed my 6 pax lic. but still want to gain more experience before I complete the other paperwork to become an 'official' charter.

  2. #2
    Member DMan's Avatar
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    Default

    I know locally Glacier Craft has built several charter boats.
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  3. #3
    New member fishnhuntr's Avatar
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    Default From what I've read on here....

    Stay away from glacier craft. How big you looking at going?

  4. #4
    New member fishnhuntr's Avatar
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    Default well...

    I guess if you don't mind waiting until 2010 or something then maybe....

  5. #5
    Member fishin 45's Avatar
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    You better buy a used boat that has a charter history that goes with it. The halibut charter moritorium will keep you out unless you can prove the boat fished in 2005 and every year since. It is due to take effect in 2010. I know because I am one of those guys that got in in 2006 and come 2010 I have to buy someone out or quit. How fair is that? I,ll have 4 years in business and then get kicked out.

  6. #6
    Member GWHunter's Avatar
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    Default So many issues

    I heard rumors of this and really am not too worried yet since I won't try to charter until 10 or 11. Again there may be a run of used boats then when everyone is chased out.

    I am looking at a 28' to 30'. It will be the right size and will be good for use for personal time also.

  7. #7
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    Default Moritorium

    Hey Fisher 45,

    Where do I get info on the limited entry into the charter business? I thought that didn't pass?

    Gooch

  8. #8
    Member fishin 45's Avatar
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    The moritorium did pass and I'll get you implementation info and let you know . I'll have to dig it up.

  9. #9
    Member fishin 45's Avatar
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    A little clarification from NOAA. I spoke with Julie Scheurer with NOAA and the moritorium proposal is still happening. The Rule is slated to be published next month. After that, the process will take about two years before it becomes a regulation.
    The timing I mentioned in the earlier post was correct though. If it continues as expected you would have to have charter fishing experience in 2004 or 2005 and then every year continuing from then on to qualify for the right to halibut charter. So my earlier statement of being out in 2010 if you did not fish in 2005 is true, IF this goes the distance.
    Julie with NOAA can be reached for more info at (907)586-7356 or julie.scheurer@noaa.gov

    On a different note the halibut GHL for 3A will remain the same this year .
    No new regs are proposed. That means the slot limit of under 32 inch for one halibut is not happening according to Julie.

  10. #10
    Member GWHunter's Avatar
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    Default Getting Fingers Crossed

    All I can do is hope that this truly doesn't happen! I wonder what the going price will be when someone sells thier permit? Are we talking mega $$$ or just enough to make it painful?

    Still haven't heard too much about the boats....

  11. #11
    Member captaindd's Avatar
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    Default New Info

    Dear NACO Member,



    NMFS provides notice of Pacific halibut guideline harvest levels (GHLs) for the guided sport charter vessel fishery in the
    International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC) regulatory areas 2C and 3A. The GHLs provide a benchmark harvest level for participants in the charter fishery. This notice is necessary to meet the management and regulatory requirements for the GHLs and to inform the public about the 2008 GHLs for the charter halibut fishery.

    DATES: The GHLs are effective beginning February 1, 2008, through December 31, 2008. This period is specified by the IPHC as the sport fishing season in all waters of Alaska.

    FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Julie Scheurer, (907) 586-7356, or email at julie.scheurer@noaa.gov.

    The GHLs are intended to serve as a benchmark harvest level for participants in the charter fishery.
    This announcement is consistent with 50 CFR 300.65(c)(2), which requires that GHLs for IPHC regulatory areas 2C and 3A be specified by NMFS and announced by publication in the Federal Register no later than 30 days after receiving information from the IPHC. The IPHC annually establishes the constant exploitation yield (CEY) for halibut in IPHC regulatory areas 2C and 3A. Regulations at Sec. 300.65(c)(1) establish the GHLs based on the CEY that is established annually by the IPHC. The CEY established by the IPHC for 2008 is 6,500,000 lb in Area 2C and 28,960,000 lb in Area 3A. The corresponding GHLs are 931,000 lb in Area 2C, and 3,650,000 lb in Area 3A. The GHL in Area 2C has been reduced from the 2007 level of 1,432,000 lb. The GHL for Area 3A did not change.
    This is a notice of the GHLs in Areas 2C and 3A for 2008 and does not require any regulatory action by NMFS. If a GHL is exceeded in
    2008, NMFS will notify the North Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) in writing within 30 days of receipt of that information. The Council has proposed management actions to reduce the harvest of Pacific halibut in the Area 2C guided charter vessel fishery to the GHL (72 FR 74257, December 31, 2007). The Secretary of Commerce may issue a final rule after consideration of the 2008 GHL and public comments on the proposed rule.

    Keeping You Informed
    National Association of Charterboat Operators




    You will have do decide on the type of charters that you are going to due. Day Charters, Over Night Charters, or Multi Day Charters. Which area are you going to fish? In Prince William Sound you will need a boat that can cruise at 30Kts, carries 6 passengers, and has a range of 400 miles. The boat must have a deep V to run in 3 and 4ft seas. Bay Weld out of Homer makes one of the best boats. Estimate cost with outboards $180000 with diesels $280000. Other good boats Sea Wolf, Cold Water, Max Weld, Anderson, and many good fiber glass boats. Also purchase of Charter IFQ if there is any it will be costly. Commercial IFQ is running around $25 a pound and I am guessing they will come up with some kind of formula to change fish to pounds. Your best bet is to buy some ones charter business and boat before the Charter IFQ becomes law. Gets the owner to sign a paper transferring his IFQ rights to you.


  12. #12
    Member fishin 45's Avatar
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    Default

    Captain DD is right. Your best bet is to buy a business with the needed history. Beware though, you will have to hire a captain to run your boat from the time you buy the biz until you get your captain,s license, because a lapse in even one season and you're out.

  13. #13
    Member captaindd's Avatar
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    Default Captain's License

    You need to start getting you Captain's License as soon as possible. You need 5 years of experince with 300 days on the water. If you are going to fish in Prince William Sound you can get by with and Inland Waters License which means you can use your time on a river boat or lake boat. If you go to the Gulf Of Alaska you must up grade you LC to near Coastal. I would check the Coast Guard Site to make sure of the requirements because it has been 20 years since I took the test. Also note here is another requirement:
    Dear NACO Member,

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), through the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and the United States
    Coast Guard (Coast Guard), issues this final rule to amend provisions of its previously issued final rule, to allow for greater participation
    in the TWIC program and codify final fees to obtain a TWIC. This final rule continues to further secure our Nation's ports and modes of
    transportation, and also implements the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002 (MTSA) and the Security and Accountability for
    Every Port Act of 2006 (SAFE Port Act). Those statutes require credentialed merchant mariners and individuals with unescorted access
    to secure areas of vessels and facilities to undergo a security threat assessment and receive a biometric credential, known as a
    Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC).

    With this final rule, the Coast Guard amends its regulations on vessel and facility security, requiring the use of the TWIC as an
    access control measure. Specifically, the Coast Guard is amending its definition of secure areas, to take into account facilities in the
    Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, whose workers are not required to obtain work visas from the United States before being
    allowed to work.

    With this final rule, TSA amends its regulations on TWIC to allow additional non-resident aliens to apply for a TWIC if they are working
    in a job that requires them to have unescorted access to a maritime facility regulated under 33 CFR parts 105 or 106. TSA also amends the
    scope provision of the rule to include additional non-resident aliens that may apply for TWIC. TSA amends its regulations to clarify those
    credentialed merchant mariners who may receive a TWIC at a reduced fee.

    TSA amends the fee portion of the regulation, increasing the replacement credential fee from $36 to $60 and codifying the other fees
    that were announced in the Federal Register on March 20, 2007. Finally, TSA announces a reduction in the fee charged by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to conduct fingerprint-based criminal history record checks (CHRCs) that are submitted to the FBI electronically. Therefore, the standard fee for a TWIC is $132.50 and the reduced TWIC fee for applicants who have completed a comparable threat assessment is $105.25.

    DATES: This final rule is effective September 28, 2007.

    FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
    If you have questions on the TSA portions of this rule, call Christine Beyer, telephone (571) 227-2657.
    If you have questions on the Coast Guard portions of this rule, call LCDR Jonathan Maiorine, telephone 1-877-687-2243.
    If you have questions on viewing the docket, call Renee V. Wright, Program Manager, Docket Operations, telephone (202) 493-0402. [Docket Nos. TSA-2006-24191; USCG-2006-24196] RIN 1652-AA41

    Keeping You Informed
    National Association of Charterboat Operators

    www.nacocharters.org

  14. #14

    Default

    Captdd,

    Are you saying that the time line for being eligible for future charter IFQs is starting this year? Or, is it still going back to 2005? In other words... if I start chartering this season, can I expect quotas and be able to charter in the future for halibut?

    Thanks.

  15. #15
    Member fishin 45's Avatar
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    I know you asked Captain DD, but I'll answer. Hope you don't mind.

    No you cannot enter this year and expect to fish for halibut after 2009. I entered two years ago and I'll be out unless I buy someone else's business. As I said earlier, I spoke with NOAA today to check the facts again.

  16. #16

    Default Just look around?

    There are at least two charter businesses for sale in Deep creek that come with needed permit and one for sale in SE, these I found on craigslist.
    http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/557256342.html
    http://seattle.craigslist.org/oly/boa/567399141.html

    Don't even think about buying any IFQ's, The moratorium is supported by most charters (its coming where we want it or not) IFQ's do not have the support and will be fought by most in the business.
    Last edited by profishguide; 02-13-2008 at 07:38. Reason: added comment
    Frank
    Alaska Wildrose Charters and Cabins
    www.wildroselodge.com

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fishin 45 View Post
    I know you asked Captain DD, but I'll answer. Hope you don't mind.
    Thanks for the reply. That's what I thought. Which is okay, because I don't really want to do fishing charters myself.

  18. #18
    Member captaindd's Avatar
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    Default IFQ

    The way it works is they are looking at the catch results from 2004 and 2005 to get an idea of how many fish will be allowed. The moratorium is already in place. The powers to be have yet to decide how they will manage this. It can be by angler days, pounds of fish, limited entry, or season limits. They can also reduce the over all bag limits. They have already put limits on charters in South East Alaska.

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