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Thread: Bone Saw

  1. #1
    New member akhunter02's Avatar
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    Default Bone Saw

    Sheep hunters, what do you use for a bone saw? removing skull cap

  2. #2

    Default Gerber x-change a blade

    Though I'm partial to European mounts, so usually don't bring a saw.

  3. #3

    Default wyoming saw

    Quote Originally Posted by akhunter02
    Sheep hunters, what do you use for a bone saw? removing skull cap


    very packable, light, extremely efficient. Available at Cabelas.

    Good luck!

  4. #4

    Default

    Wyoming saw works pretty good.

  5. #5
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    Gerber folding lockblade saw , comes with 2 blades, will easily cut your hand right off (that sharp), did a bull moose rack with it last fall in no time at all. Best feature, weighs nothing.

  6. #6
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    Default Wyoming Saw

    Buy a Wyoming Saw. They are compact, durable, **** near bombproof and you can buy extra blades should you ever need to. I'm still on the original blade after about 40 deer.... speaking of which... only 5 more days till deer season!

  7. #7
    Member Kurt S's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm a fan of the Sawvivor myself. Aluminum frame, light as hell and the two blades store in the top beam. I've used this saw for 15 yrs on more game than I can count.
    When I originally bought it there wasn't a meat blade, only a wood cutting one. I took it to Purple Hippo on 88th and he made a meat blade for it out of band saw stock.
    Last Nov while cutting up my bison in -35, the plastic tensioner snapped while tightning the blade. Still worked, just not as much tension.
    I sent Sawvivor an email when I got back, asking for a new tension screw and wing nut. Didn't get a reply so wondered? About 3 weeks later, I got a package from Canada...and low and behold, a brand new saw complete with both meat and wood blades. Seems they have a life time warrenty!

    Great saw!

    kurt

  8. #8

    Default

    I have the Wyoming Saw 1 which works great for sheep, caribou, and deer but it is to small for cutting through a moose skull. Been using it for almost 12 years now and the only thing I had to replace on it was the bone blade.

  9. #9
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Default Sierra saw

    I have tried several. Currently I use the inexpensive, plastic handled “sierra” folding saw you see at Walmarts every where (sportsman’s warehouse too) Weight is great, cuts wood and bone great, doesn’t hang up on the skull like a saw with a top frame, and if the blade goes dull they sell spare blades that pop right in. Think I paid a whopping 8 bucks for it.

    Dave

  10. #10
    Member colodan's Avatar
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    Default

    Wyoming saw. I've guided several elk seasons in Colorado and used the saw on skulls and breast plates for many of Elk. Compact and a tuff piece of equipmnet.

  11. #11
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    Default Saw for Sheep Hunting

    I think my Wyoming saw is the best hunting saw except when I am backpacking. Last year I bought the Gerber folding saw with the locking blade that was mentioned in a previous post. The saw easily removed the horns and skull plates from two sheep and is very light weight. Carry only the saw with the bone blade and leave the wood blade and case at home for a sheep hunt. The weight of your pack is reduced a few ounces at a time.

  12. #12

    Default Knapp Saw

    I just looked up the super-light Wyoming Saw -- 18 oz. is the listed weight. My Knapp saw weighs 5.8 oz. with the case. It is 30 years old and cuts great when it is sharp -- once every 6-10 heads does it. Unfortunately I have been told the newer ones do not have good steel and may not even be re-sharpenable. If you can find an older one, it is a great backpacking saw, and can cut a large tree if necessary.

  13. #13

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    I'd flat forgotten what my saw was called until Tony sent me googling to discover that it's a Knapp Saw. I've been using mine for several decades and resharpen it occasionally with a small triangular file. I also have one that's only 20 years old that is the same basic design but made by Buck.

    The advantages are that it is light and has no back bar that limits its bite. Its disadvantage is that it is short (so you've got to use lots of little cuts) and that the blade is non-replaceable.
    He fears his fate too much or his desserts are small who fears on just one touch to win or lose it all.

  14. #14
    Member Redlander's Avatar
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    Default Bone Saw

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaCub
    Gerber folding lockblade saw , comes with 2 blades, will easily cut your hand right off (that sharp), did a bull moose rack with it last fall in no time at all. Best feature, weighs nothing.
    This is what I'm packing for a caribou hunt in September - it has both bone and wood-cutting blades. We'll see how it works. It is very, very light.

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