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Thread: Old timers

  1. #1
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    Default Old timers

    interesting how things play out . I wonder how all the old timers got by up here without bobbed barrels , quick detachable and forward mounted scopes , illuminated reticles , stainless barreled actions , synthetic stocks , ultra magnums , short magnums and more efficient .375 caliber magnums , not to mention a lack of premium bullets . Must have all been nervous wrecks slinging just Powerpoints and Silvertips . On top of all that how the hell could they have gotten any shut-eye without an electric bear fence set up along with a .500 Smith and can of pepper spray laying next to them ? man , must have been tough , poor old guys .

  2. #2

    Default They weren't trapped in a circle of consumerism...

    They used what was available and what they could afford...

  3. #3

    Talking old timer?

    What are you saying Logman? Are you calling me an old timer? After reading your post, it seems as though you're describing me. I hunt with an open sighted 1885 highwall, no bear fence and none of the other emenities you mentioned. I do shoot Barnes X bullets though, but I guess maybe you're right. I've got a safe full of scoped mags, but I personally find it more satisfying to put hunting back into the equation, and I just added a 1895 Marlin 45-70 to the "old timer" list. Just me. Ciao.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Interesting thoughts. The daddy .375 magnum, the .375 H&H is what, almost a 100 years old? I would think that qualifies as an old timer itself. Newer ones may be more efficient but they alwasy compare themselves to the "daddy". The use of modern materials? Each generation of hunters used, for their time, the modern inventions. You can ask the same question about why hunters went from muzzle loaders to breech loaders, or single shot to "repeaters", black powdeer to morent smokeless propellents. How about going from fur to wool? Premium bullets are more efficient in cleanly killing the animal, making it better in recovery sonce there are less wounded animals to lose and more humane for the animal itself. As far as bear fence, I use one primarily so my daughter will feel more comfortable or around the meat to keep it for myself. That way I don't have to shoot the bear.
    In 50 years you'll be able to say the same things about what we use today.

  5. #5
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    Lightbulb Last post on the subject

    I don't think the analogy ( blackpowder to smokeless , etc. ) works all that well . I spent too much time on Kodiak and used Johnson floor on my rifles instead of chasing stainless . Bullet placement can almost be said to be the whole shooting match , .22 caliber rifles have killed many a bear , all species , we all know about Bell and his elephants . I think we all , me included , get way too hung up " new " this and new that . I spent a couple months working in Colorado a few years ago , knocked around as much as I had time for and felt the difference being out of big bear country , not hardly as interesting . Dragging gps's , satellite phones and bear fences around seems like it might be an effort to turn the experience into a stroll above Telluride , it ain't safe all the time and that's the beauty of it .

  6. #6

    Default I am an old-timer.

    I am an old-timer, and my favorite rifles are Win. Mdl. '95s. I don't see so well anymore, however, particularly in the dark. A bear fence sounds like a good idea to me. My .458 has a Surefire light I can attach under the barrel with a pressure switch on the forend, right where my thumb goes. I back it with a Ruger .454 Casull with 330 gr. hard-cast lead bullets or Swift A-Frame bullets. I'm not sure I can add much more to my pack with all my usual equipment along. Just the ammo is too heavy. I suppose I could leave the food at home......... I carry freeze dried food, but supplement with grouse or ptarmigan & sometimes fish, plus real butter.

    I used to pack a S&W 4" Highway Patrolman for urban varmints who would bust my grey head, but have gone to a Glock Mdl. 27 in 40 S&W with a Crimson Trace laser. I can shoot it from the hip with deadly accuracy, it holds more rounds, it is reliable, and much smaller and lighter. It protects friends and family, plus my much greyer head, and keeps us alive, whatever.

    Nostalgia is one thing, and I am one of the most nostalgic, but like other old-timers, I find it necessary to use the best technology to stay alive longer. At least I have managed to keep the same set of good ethics all my life. In the late 1890s my grandfather, a sourdough, set aside his 1886 Winchester in favor of a Win. '95 flat-side. In .30-40 Krag, it was the latest technology, would kill moose much farther away, was lighter to pack, more reliable in cycling, didn't require cleaning right away, and worked well for him. He backed it with an 1875 Rem. revolver in .44-40. When Win. jacketed, smokeless, Hi-speed rifle ammo became available, he carried that in his revolver.

    Whatever keeps us alive so we get to be old-timers. The need for good shooting is still there, no matter what we carry. I just need to accommodate my old eyes. Not to do so could prove fatal. Oh, I also wear digital hearing aids. They do help a little with things that go 'pop' in the brush, though my old dog does even better when I'm just backpacking. I also use deet instead of bear grease, and put it on the dog, too.
    Jack.

  7. #7
    Member Eastwoods's Avatar
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    Unhappy

    This post just grabbed at my gut. Although I feel that I'm obsessed with firearms, ballistics, etc. I've never thought that it was a bad thing. However, lately I've been going overboard. I've always known that part of it is the dreaming of big hunts, being prepared etc. But, I do not like when I think I have to have the newest gadgit (consumerism). I'm good at resisting, but I spend too much time thinking about it. Aarrrg.....Its only 2 months past deer/blk bear season and I need to go hunting! You wanna feel trapped......try living where the biggest block of wilderness near you is 2 square miles! Sorry, I'm rambling.

  8. #8

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    I think those old guys had more going for them than we think. They did not use deoderant, did not eat well (bad teeth) (chewed tobackee) so they were skinny and they stunk to high heaven. Now no bear is going to stalk from down wind on these guys there eyes would be watering and there was not a lot to eat even if they won the fight . Now today the hunter got lots of food is a little or lot over weight and don't stink so bad so he needs better equipment to protect his buns ( it's just a thought)

  9. #9

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    I've taken all my big game and about 98% of my small game in recent years with tradtional muzzleloaders. Makes me older than dirt, I guess. Faced down a brown bear charge last year with one 54 caliber round ball in the pipe and no backup.

    Afterwards I considered packing one of my modern arms for backup, but this is looking like the right answer for me. At the ranges I'll be shooting, more shots aren't going to be possible anyway, and I bet it can put something downrange that will be a reasonable brown bear attention getter.

  10. #10
    Mark
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by logman View Post
    .....I wonder how all the old timers got by up here......
    If a hundred years ago is "old timer" enough, why don't you read about it and find out?

  11. #11
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Afterwards I considered packing one of my modern arms for backup, but this is looking like the right answer for me. At the ranges I'll be shooting, more shots aren't going to be possible anyway, and I bet it can put something downrange that will be a reasonable brown bear attention getter.
    Nice looking pistol! .62 caliber is 20ga as well. Get some of those 20ga Dixie Slugs and use the lead out of them!

  12. #12
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    Default

    When did they stop using Bowie Knives for backup?

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  13. #13

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    Don't miss what you don't have or don't know about!!! You don't have it so you don't need. You don't know about it so you don't look for it. So they thought every thing was fine and how it ought to be and the only option was go do it.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  14. #14

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    I guess they were state of the art and at the cutting edge of technology at the time. They made do. I'm sure they liked the feel of a fine knife and a good axe and were better at using them than we are. They were more than likely by far better in the wild than we are today. No guide with shooting sticks or jumping around a kill and braying like jackasses like they do on the TV (hunting ) shows. Maybe I'm out of touch, I have never been joyful about shooting something. but maybe a thankful feeling in my heart that I was part of something bigger, perhaps Humble is the word. but it's special.

  15. #15

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    Unfortunately it won't be long until there will be dance competitions between the outdoor shows and the NFL players end zone dances.

  16. #16

    Default

    Aint that the truth. I've got a deal with my wife. I dumped the cable and put the money into outdoor adventures and toys of my own. You look at what you spend in a year to have that trash piped into your house, and it's a good trade. Best of all, the wife's happier too, cuzz she gets to go on the trips and enjoy the toys, too.

  17. #17
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    Default

    old guy:
    I agree that.
    Smitty of the North



    BrownBear:
    We have the Dish Network, and it's the same. Lotsa TRASH.
    You made a good trade, I reckon.
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  18. #18

    Default Memories of Old Sunrise.

    If you want to read about how the old-timers, 100 yrs. ago and more, got by in Alaska, go to the Cook Inlet Historical Society in Anchorage or the Historical Society museum in Hope, and look at "Memories of Old Sunrise" by A.W. Morgan. There are other good historical books at the C.I H.S Museum in Anchorage.

    The old-timers were tough. The ones that survived knew good equipment and treasured it. They knew good steel. They brought in premium knives and axes, because their lives depended on those tools. I don't know how many of them carried Bowie knives, my guess is not many. But they had good knives and axes, and knew more than anybody I have met today about sharpening them. I learned to sharpen knives and other tools from my grandfather, who was a sourdough, and a life-long woodsman, and when I finish a knife or axe, you can shave with it. I still use my grandfather's notching axe, and still use it, and it will take an edge you wouldn't believe. A notching axe was used to cut peg holes into large trees above the ground-swell, so a standing-board could be driven into the hole. The logger stood on the board and drew a misery-whip (2 man cross-cut saw) back and forth to fell the tree.

    They had many skills modern folks don't have, and the successful ones were meticulous about what they took with them into the wild, especially in the winter. Most of them carried plenty of kerosene for starting fires, for example, but could make do with pitch from evergreens.
    Jack.

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