Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Kodiak Goat Hair

  1. #1
    Member SperBear's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    114

    Default Kodiak Goat Hair

    So after reading various reports on this website, I've seen many different opinions/views on the quality of goat hair, including:
    - The hair will grow a few inches in the first couple weeks of October.
    - Early September hair is the same as late September hair.
    - August hair obviously isn't the best... but a few of the pictures I've seen on this website show some good looking August goats!?!
    - Obviously the later in the year the better quality hair...seems to be the common theme.

    How much different would the quality of hair be whether it was an August or September goat? How much different is the hair between mid September and mid October?
    Anyone have any August-goat shoulder mount pics? Are they much different looking than the September goats?
    I don't know much about goats so any and all help would be great, Thanks

  2. #2
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    165

    Default

    It comes down to personal taste and this is just my opinion, having a long hair goat is more important than even the horn length. Unless you're a real goat afficionado, the average person is not going to be able to tell you whether a goat is a good goat, or an exceptional goat, by looking at just a single mounted animal. However, anyone would be impressed with the beauty of a long haired winter goat regardless of the horn length. For my tastes, I prefer the looks of a long hair goat with 9.5" horns over a 10" goat with short hair.

    For reference, this is a mid-October Kodiak. I would have preferred an even later hunt like Dec.-Jan but they are expensive.

  3. #3

    Default

    The goats here never get the short hair most think of when they think August goats. The pics you see of the real short haired goats are from the lower 48. As a rule of thumb a goat will gain around 1/4" of hair a week in the fall. So if you wait a month you can assume it will be about an inch longer. Each individual goat is different though. Here's a Sept 4th goat for comparison.


  4. #4
    Member muskeg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hollis
    Posts
    963

    Default Hair in S SE

    It has been my experience that during the late Aug / Sept time frame that Goat hair is growing like about 1 inch or so per week.

    Some individuals are kinda medium hair on Sept 1st while some can be a little shorter. I have seen it as an individual thing even within a group of Goats on the same mountain.

    In SE you have to decide on a little shorter haired Goat over our famous Oct weather. Last Oct we had 35 inches of rain and low snow in the Goat mountains. Very few Goats were tagged.

    George's Oct 4th 2007 B&C Goat
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Somewhere between lucky and extremely lucky
    Posts
    592

    Default

    I killed my Kodiak goat (DG475) on opening day two years ago- August 20th and it has short hair. I am super happy with it- 9 3/4" on both sides- but it does have short hair. I had to hunt at that time per my work schedule, otherwise I would have waited until at least mid-september. This year I drew a goat tag here in the valley and I don't plan on going until the last week of September- or later, weather depending.

  6. #6
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,464

    Default

    heres a late oct goat, i think like the 20th give or take a day or two, it seems to be a couple inches of long hair diff from early oct to late oct, maybe later in the season the hair growth speeds up, not sure, but like TB said, kodiak goats always have some hair, they don't go bald like some other goats do, I like the late season goats, i'll fight the weather, can't beat and extra 2-3 inches of hair when it comes to a mount, takes the eyes away from the horns too and really adds to the mount.

    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  7. #7
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    well the earlier you go the less likely it will not be sideways rain/snow/sleet
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  8. #8
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,443

    Default Goat hair

    A couple of months back there was a thread on someone looking for a goat cape, because apparently he had lost his, or something to that nature, and was looking for one. well there were a few that were willing to sell theirs for a hefty price, one even stated that those capes fetch several thousand dollars I believe it was in Japan. So yeah, I think it s worth roughing it out in the austere weather conditions during late season, besides if you survive it you have one heck of a story to go along with your trophy.....ck

  9. #9
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,464

    Default

    i don't think sideways weather on kodiak is seasonal....when it wasn't snowing last oct we had great weather, cold and clear with wind...
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  10. #10
    Member muskeg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hollis
    Posts
    963

    Default Maybe Kodiak is different than SE

    I make sure my Oct Goat hunters understand what they might be up against and we go in prepared to stay for awhile. Oct (and later) in S SE is for the hardcore Goat hunter.

    Best Times to Hunt:
    Weather plays a significant role in determining the enjoyment and success of your goat hunt. The best weather generally occurs during August and early September, and generally deteriorates into increasing rain, fog, and wind as the season progresses. Snow can fall as early as late September and will likely fall during October. High alpine lakes can freeze in late October and November, creating serious problems for drop-offs and pick-ups. Most ail charter companies avoid taking hunters into high lakes after mid October.
    Goat hunters must choose between trophy quality and weather conditions. By hunting early, hunters recognize that they are more likely to experience good weather, but will have to settle for bagging short-haired goats. Hunters who elect to hunt during October, November, or December, on the other hand, know that the goats they encounter will have longer hair and make better trophies than early goats, but they also know that they have a greater chance of being plagued by nasty weather. You should consider these trade-offs seriously before selecting your hunt dates. Remember, many hunters have spent entire hunts tent-bound with no opportunity to pursue goats.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •