Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: g.p.s. for a technophobe

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    porcupine creek
    Posts
    225

    Default g.p.s. for a technophobe

    Can anyone recommend a sure fire easy to use g.p.s. ?

  2. #2
    Member BigHinER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Colorado til I can get back to 'Laska.
    Posts
    261

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by logman View Post
    Can anyone recommend a sure fire easy to use g.p.s. ?
    I have a Garmin GPS Map 60. It simple, tough and weatherproof as it goes on my 4 wheeler through mud, water and snow. It does alot more than I use it for. With the software, you can make way points you want to see and transfer to the GPS or vice versa, transfer waypoints from the GPS that you made along the way. It's not a "color" model and that would be the only upgrade I can think of. Just shop around... Here is a pic of a trip we made to Jim Creek. There are also plenty of after market accessories for Garmins. I'm sure there are "better" ones out there but this one works for me.

    Originally Posted by BIGBOB
    Estimate of time of death appears to be same day he died.

  3. #3
    Member Buck Nelson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    338

    Default Garmin eTrex series

    They are about as simple and intuitive as I've seen. The cheapest ones just do the basics, but they are relatively easy to use. I just bought an eTrex HCx mapping GPS which is a little more complex but has lots of additional features like an electronic compass.

  4. #4
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    The electronin compass is worth the extra expense. If your GPS doesn't have the compass it will lose track of north when you are stopped. I always take a real compass as backup regardless of how great my GPS is. I carry a Garmin 60CSX with topo maps for whole state loaded onto it. The display is color and most features are fairly intuitive. A little time playing with it in the woods (in areas you know) and you will get used to it. The Magellan Triton series was supposed to have the market cornered on "easy" to use and they are supposed to accept the Nat Geo Topo Maps. I was set to get them but numerous delays and software problems sent me to the garmin. Once Magellan get't the triton working properly it will likely be the new standard since it uses a full color touch screen display and a real operating system.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Soldonta, Alaska
    Posts
    315

    Default Garmin Etrex

    I have had a garmin e-trex for over ten years. They are bullet proof. I put some velcro on the back and it goes on the snow machine. They are easy to use and I dont need anything fancy. They are around $100.

  6. #6

    Default Garmin gets another vote.

    I've got an eTrex Legend CX that I've had almost two years and it is very easy to use. As has been said already, you can get a basic Garmin for about $100 that will get you from Point A to Point B and back again. I know people who have Lowrance and Magellan units that aren't nearly as easy to use as my Garmin.
    NRA Life Member, Prior F-16 crew chief.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    porcupine creek
    Posts
    225

    Default Thanks from my son for all the advice

    My oldest bought one of the garmin g.p.s. and has it all figured out , I guess . Thanks from him to all of you . I can't figure out what you guys do when the batteries run out on those contraptions . Thanks again , advanced , die-hard senior techophobe

  8. #8
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I put new batteries in mine and it picks up where I left off. I go trough about 2 batteries every 20 hours of run time or so.

  9. #9
    Member BigHinER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Colorado til I can get back to 'Laska.
    Posts
    261

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by logman View Post
    I can't figure out what you guys do when the batteries run out on those contraptions .
    Mine is plugged into the 12v power supply on the wheeler. It has rechargeable batteries in it so when the wheeler is on, it's chargin'.
    Originally Posted by BIGBOB
    Estimate of time of death appears to be same day he died.

  10. #10
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BigHinER View Post
    Mine is plugged into the 12v power supply on the wheeler. It has rechargeable batteries in it so when the wheeler is on, it's chargin'.
    I thought about that setup untill I realized that on a 10 day backpack sheep hunt I wouldn't have any way to charge it. The downfall with the 60 series Garmin is that it won't take lithium batteries since they hold a higher intitial voltage than alkaline (aparently there is a high voltage cutoff circuit). The garmin will run on external power though to save you batts while traveling on an atv. I bought the garmin poser adapter but foung out later that it will accept a mini usb car charger like those used on many cell phones. I allready had a mini usb car charger for my cell phone and wasted the $20 on the "special" charger .

  11. #11

    Default

    How many hours a day do you think you need to use it on a backpacking trip? I've used them for work navigating a snowmachine round the Coleville Delta in the dark in January, and had a hard time using them two hours a day. I don't see a sheep hunter with plenty of landmarks around having enough time to burn up two sets of batteries on a 10 day hunt in the same drainage or two.

    Keeping a boat on a rhumb line is one thing. Practical navigation in the sheep hills is another, I think.


  12. #12
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    ... the 60 series Garmin is that it won't take lithium batteries ...
    Are you sure about this and have you tried running it on lithium batteries? I've run lithium batteries in all my Garmin units, but I haven't used anything from the 60 series. The older Garmins didn't have battery settings, but worked just fine with any AA battery. My eTrex Vista has a battery setting in the system setup that you set to Alkaline, NiCad, NiMH, or Lithium. The battery gauge then displays the power level correctly, but it makes no difference to the overall operation. Garmin used to have a voltage regulator built in to the unit as the electronic processors are computer grade and need exacting voltages. Lithium batteries start out about 0.15 volts higher than a brand new alkaline.

    Also, for your rechargables in the field, consider a solar battery charger. There are some very cool ones with flexible solar panels that roll up into a very compact package and will charge a couple NiMH batteries by just sitting in the sunlight at camp.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  13. #13
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    It is a well known problem with the 60 series. NIMH work I think it even has a special mode for them to keep the charge indicator functioning properly. check this out on another forum http://forums.gpscity.com/showthread.php?t=3243

    I like the 60 other than that. I would like the higher res topo maps that the new magellan is supposed to offer (provided it actualy works...) I agree with the sentimeate that you probably wouldn't "need" to keep your GPS on all the time but if you are traveling and lose visability then it may make the diference in getting back to camp or sleeping on the side of the mountain. If you have it on the whole time you can just reverse your route if not it is just a realy fancy compass (if it has an electric compass if not it is a fancy compass that you have to be moving for it to tell which direction is north not the best idea in the mountains!).

  14. #14
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    The thread you linked to was confusing at best. One post said that Garmin had a software upgrade that added lithium to the battery list, while another said that setting the unit to NiMH would allow using the lithium batteries. Others claimed that didn't work. Too much hearsay info for me. I wasn't looking to get anything from the 60 series, but I have been looking to step up to a 76 series, which runs nearly identical software as the 60. My old man got a 76 a few years ago and I really like the display on that unit. It is huge and it's still an easy backcountry carry.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  15. #15
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I read the rest of that post as well as others and agree there is alot of dispute. I have a 60csx and I am gonna do the only logical thing and download the latest firmware then test it with some energizer non-rechargable lithiums. I know that the 76 series has had no problems with the lithium batts.

  16. #16

    Default 76 vs 60csx

    I purchased the 60 czx for the enhanced antena. You might want to look into this feature. It really made a difference in steep canyons and /or heavy timber.

  17. #17
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    silly database error killed my first reply... here goes, again:

    The external antenna structure on the 60s is the one feature that I really disliked. Add this battery issue and that clenches it for me. The only reliable sub-zero battery is the lithium, so if it won't run on a brand new lithium, I don't want it.

    As for reception, I get rock solid reception with my pocket eTrex unit that has one of the smallest antennas in the Garmin lineup. Also, the 76 has external antenna and power jacks and I've already got an external antenna and regulated power supply on my snowmachine. I just need to upgrade the 12-series handlebar mount to a 76 series mount, coupled with a new thumbwarmer pad on the back. The larger screen on the 76 is the selling feature for me. I want to read it with a quick glance while running the trail at 60mph or bounding through the woods breaking new trail. And these new color displays look sweet.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  18. #18
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I have my 60csx on a handle bar mount. the mount is pretty cheesy looking but seems to hold the unit pretty good. The mount removes easily and leaves just a collar on the bar which is nice for when it is time to REALLY start riding! I also loop the lanyard around the bar in case the mount fails. I don't mind the antenna on the 60 it gets WAY better reception than the etrex that I have used in the past. I don't think you will go wrong with the 76 though. I really just wish that the Magellan Triton turned out to be wave of the future like it was touted to be...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •