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Thread: 375 ruger scope?

  1. #1
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Default 375 ruger scope?

    I just got my new 375 ruger alaskan sighted in with iron sights 1"group at 50 yards no problem. I need a scope now. Im gonna get something like the 1.5 x5 leupold or the same in a trijicon? Anybody tried the trijicon? It looks like a good close cover quick pointer that would work in low light dark rainy days etc.

  2. #2
    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
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    Thumbs up 375 Ruger

    I put a Leupold Matte 1.5x5 on mine with Warne Quick Relese Lever Med Matte Rings

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    Default Leupold

    For the 375 Ruger, or H&H for that matter, I would go with the 1.75-6x or the 2.5-8x Leupold. I would lean towards the 1.75-6x if in the brush around bears and the 2.5-8x for more open work, such as elk. I like the idea on the QR mounts if you have open sights, with Warne as my pick there also.

    Woody

  4. #4
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    Default

    I'll echo what MM & WW suggested, any of the scopes they mentioned would work great, just depends on your personal preference and what conditions your going to be useing the rifle in........I'd stay with the Leupold line-dependable and very rugged-I run a 1.75-6x leupy with Warne Premier QD rings & bases on my 375 H&H, FWIW.

  5. #5
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Default

    I posted this in another thread, but I got a matte Leupold 4x on mine.

  6. #6

    Default Scope for .375.

    Doesn't matter how sharp a scope is if you hunt in the rain and melting snow. They fog on the outside of the lens, and raindrops put you out of business. I have a Bushnell Elite, 3200, 1.5 to 4.5 on my Marlin .45-70. It has taken a brutal beating and still works fine. I like the firefly reticle in low light, and the fact that it doesn't fog up outside and it lets one see right through heavy rain on the lenses. I have it in a tip-off Weaver mount that has worked well for years. Twilight function of this scope is excellent....more than my eyes can use. I have the Elite 4200 2.5 to 10 on another rifle, too high powered for your use, but they make a lower powered model. Same RainGuard feature as the 3200, and also with firefly reticle. Very sharp and bright. I haven't seen a scope brighter. The 2.5-10 is a little heavy, but not as heavy as a lot of European scopes.
    I would not hesitate to mount a low powered Elite on my .458, and just might.
    Jack.

    I have heard great things about Trijicon scopes, but have not used one.
    Jack.

  7. #7
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Morgan View Post
    Doesn't matter how sharp a scope is if you hunt in the rain and melting snow.
    That's what Butler Creek caps are for.

  8. #8
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Default

    Butler Creek caps preformed dismally for me in SE. I've gone with scope coats, they keep the water out.

    kingfisherktn

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    Butler Creek caps preformed dismally for me in SE. I've gone with scope coats, they keep the water out.
    I agree, I use the Butler Creek Bikini covers, they keep the water out and are quick to remove for shooting. When I used the flip style caps it seemed that they caused more condensation than they prevented.

    Woody


    http://www.cabelas.com/prod-1/0006221710415a.shtml

  10. #10
    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
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    Default burris

    I put a Burris Fullfield II on mine, very rugged, lifetime guarentee and made in the USA. I used Leupolds for ever until a buddy let me use his encore once that had a burris mounted on it. I fell in love with the burris and never went back. Have put Burris on the last 3 rifles and on my encore pistol barrel. All zeroed easily, hold the zero even after being bounced around on an ATV and banged on trees and stuff in the field. And a big bonus is that they are about 1/3 to 1/2 the price of the Leupold line of comparable scopes and just as clear and crisp in all light conditions.

  11. #11
    Member Unalakleet yooper's Avatar
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    Default

    I have 2 of the Trijicon 3-9x40 scopes and have had one of then for probably 6 or 7 years and the scopes work great. They are very bright and I think are brighter than my V-XIII 3.5-10X40 scopes. These scopes are excellent in low light conditions with the illimunated post.

  12. #12

    Default Scope Covers.

    I have tried just about every kind of scope cap/lens cover out there, including everything Butler Creek has, plus Scope Coats, which seem to be some of the best. If you get in the nasty conditions, however, particularly warm rain on melting snow, all the covers will allow external fogging. Lens coatings, permanent and temporary are the best. Then put your favorite scope cover over it.

    Walking with a rifle held in two hands in soggy/humid/semi-cold conditions will cause fogging because the rifle is held close to the body, and body heat fogs the outside of the lenses in those conditions, no matter what kind of cover is on the scope, and lens coatings seem to be the only way to defeat the fogging. Of course, peep sights don't fog up.
    Jack.

  13. #13
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    Trijicon sent me two scopes to beat, abuse and generally demolish in any way that I could. Too bad I couldn't. And I tried... They are tough scopes with awesome low-light capabilities. They have some new crosshair reticles that are nice too.

    I used to be a strict Leupold guy on my hunting rifles, but now I'm liking the Trijicons.

  14. #14

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    Bushnel Elites are very good for the price and the rainguard works. A little heavy and a little short on eye relief. I am sure others would serve well but i only have experience with Bushnell in crappy conditions. and of course the usual experience with scopes which fogged up and were useless........ which is one of the reasons why I always want open sights on my rifles that are to be used in such conditions.

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    Thumbs up scopes?

    any of the lower power scopes mentioned above would be fine for this rifle. the purpose of this cartridge is close quarter dangerous game. a brush gun. a big thumper in a 20 inch configuration. the ruger hits full velocity with this short barrel. a neat thing about this cartridge is that it fits standard long actions unlike the 376 steyr and the like. i am waiting for the reminton 700 version of this cartridge. with the heavy recoil i would go with leupold mark 4 rings and a one piece mark 4 base, this is a stout set up. and the cool thing is that i would be able to switch from the scope to the iron sights with out having to lose my scopes zero. and all it takes is a turn of the wrench to pull the scope off. and as we all know hunting in alaskas back country there is not a local gun store just down the way. and all scopes seem to fog up in the morning dew. and lets face it, there is nothing like going to sleep just to wake up to a foot of snow outside the tent when you wake up. so maybe even a scout scope setup would be nice also. an old redfield, with the T.V. view, would be nice in 2-7x for shots from 100-200 yards then switch to the old dependable iron sights for less than 100. so to me with all the scope options out there i could use less expensive scope and the iron sights and still feel confident to hunt outback alaska. and it might look funny but i would also consider a scout type mounting with an EoTech or a red dot sight. you can get them with the one moa dot and this would suffice for most shots with in 200 yards. and also with the EoTech you can buy magnifyers to mount in front of the sight that would magnify 3x. so this is a rifle with alot of options, just finding the one your comfortable with is key.

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