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Thread: Mountaineering boots??

  1. #1

    Default Mountaineering boots??

    I just bought a pair of La Sportiva Glacier Evo hiking boots. I asked for the most durable and supportive boot. I'll use the boots for some hiking, goat hunting, sheep hunting, etc. It looks like a great boot, but the only waterproofing the boot has is the leather. The salesman claimed it would stay waterproof for several months under normal use, but you would want to water proof it every day if using it hard (sheep hunting). All you have to do is use a nikwax type product and it is water proof again. The big question looming in my head is "Should I have bought the gore-tex water proof boot?" I like the boot I bought better, but if my feet get wet it won't be worth a pile of you know what. A guy shopping at this store said he had the same boot I was purchasing and would hike in them all day and stand in cool mountain streams to cool his feet off. Never had them leak once. I suppose this testimonial helped sway me into purchasing these boots. Let me know if you have some experience that will help me out. This is my first pair of mountaineering type boots and I want to get it right for the $$$. I have been wearing Danner hunting boots for the past 15 years, but I need more ankle support.

    Thanks

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    They may keep the water off your feet but the leather will eventually absorb water and then you start to loose support. Which may or may not be an issue for you. For me it is. A wet leather boot does not give me enough support with a heavy pack on uneven terrain. And, after a sheep hunting trip a few years ago where I had slosh foot for several days while humping it up and down a nasty gorge getting sheep out, I went to plastic boots. Lowa Civetta.

    Anyway, I'm not so sure I would stand in a stream with my leather boots on to cool my feet off. Much nicer to stick your toes in the nice cold water and change out the sweaty socks.

    But, I love leather boots. The next leather boots I get I will probably not go with snow seal but with something like the nixwax. You can even apply that stuff to wet boots and it will penetrate the leather and give waterproofing. If they fit you right I wouldn't worry about it. Just get some good waterproofing and go for it. The other thing is that you have a high quality boot with high grade leather. That makes a big difference.
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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Use a heat gun and apply as much pure beeswax as the leather will take. You'll get a true waterproofing that will be very tough, and likely won't need a touch up for a few years. I did that with my last pair of mountaineering boots and they have held up quite well.

    If you've already used another product like snowseal, it's too late. The beeswax has to be applied to new leather.

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    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default Makalu

    I have the Sportiva Makalu. They need a resole (5th year owning them). The nice thing about rough out boots like these is the hold up to scrapes and cut really well. As far as wading in them, I think they would leak. Snow and wet foliage wont bother them. I wouldn't use beeswax on them or a heat gun especially on rough out leather. IMO heat that extreme shrinks leather. Ninwax rough out leather treatment works well. Ankle support will be very good. One thing I can tell you is once you think they are broke in take them on a short technical hike. I made the mistake of thinking mine were broke in and went on a 12 mile loop hike. I had bad heel blisters after 2 miles... not cool. But once they were broke they became my favorite boots. Get a good pair of flexible crampons and head for the hills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by byrd_hntr View Post
    ...One thing I can tell you is once you think they are broke in take them on a short technical hike. I made the mistake of thinking mine were broke in and went on a 12 mile loop hike. I had bad heel blisters after 2 miles... not cool. But once they were broke they became my favorite boots. Get a good pair of flexible crampons and head for the hills.
    Ain't that the truth. I've heard it said that it takes about 50 miles before a good pair of leather mountaineering boots are broke in. I think I agree. Takes some time to get a little rocker in the sole to.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    My first pair of mountaineering boots were Solomon's, I don't recall the model. I've waded through streams and shallow swamps and my waxed mountaineering boots don't leak. The leather hasn't shrunk from the heat. The interior padding has broken down from about 5 years of use, and somehow I just noticed a tear in the upper portion of the boot. But for nearly daily lunch time hikes, longer hikes, hunting and technical ice climbing they've been a very versatile pair of boots. My boots could also use a re-sole, but it seems many modern boots are pretty well shot by the time the sole is worn out, and you're better off getting a new pair of boots.

    Fortunately santa brought me a replacement pair for Christmas, and I'm starting to break them in. The latest pair are Asolo Granites. I'd say that 50 miles sounds like about what they'll need to be broken in, maybe 100.


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    I've got a pair of Salomons that I still wear at times. Salomon Mountain lights. Man I love those boots. They just fit good, comfy, decent rocker but still stiff enough, good full rubber rand and light. They have the Contra Grip sole. Talk about a nice sticky sole. The vibrams on my Lowa Civettas are not near as sticky. I found that out the hard way on wet rocks last year. I should have bought a couple pair of them 5 or 6 years ago.
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    Member 1stimestar's Avatar
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    Oh I have a terrible time finding boots. For running around barefoot down south most of my life, you would think I had tougher skin. I always have to duct tape my feet no matter what boots I try.
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    Maybe you just need some custom good foot beds and/or different socks?
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Member 1stimestar's Avatar
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    I've tried many different types of socks. I think I just need some custom boots. I don't know when I'll ever be able to sink that much money into boots though. There always seems to be something else I need more.
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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    It's amazing how most of us have a hard time justifying spending big money on good boots, when they will allow one to go so much farther w/o blistering. The best boots are cheap, and cheap boots are the wost way to throw away money.

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    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default Boots

    This the way I think about it. If your feet aren't comfortable your not comfortable so you might as well get the best boots you can. Ive seen many a backcountry trip ruined by bleeding sore feet. Same goes for work. I finally talked my girlfriend into get Whites for work, had them custom fitted. She cringed at the price... now she wants another pair because... "my feet don't hurt anymore and I never get blisters". Its the only argument I have ever won.

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    Member 1stimestar's Avatar
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    Oh I know, I know. But really, when it comes to a point where you are deciding to pay the rent or buy momma a new pair of boots, there really, seriously, is no choice.
    Alaska, the Madness; Bloggity Stories of the North
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    Default gore tex

    Ive found living in se is the only true water proof is an extra tuff. Second to that is good leather with gore tex. In my opinion if aint gore tex it aint nothin.

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    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Liner sock fix...

    Quote Originally Posted by 1stimestar View Post
    Oh I have a terrible time finding boots. For running around barefoot down south most of my life, you would think I had tougher skin. I always have to duct tape my feet no matter what boots I try.
    I don't know who gave me this pointer, but it was someone on this site...wear you liner socks on the OUTSIDE of your main socks.

    I was doing an alpine hike in Montana this last summer. Hiking up a waterfall so I had my laces tied with maybe a little too much slack in them. I felt resistence from my boot as I tried to lift my leg up. I gave it a bit of a good pull and pulled my foot right out of my boot. Next thing I knew, my boot was rafting downstream and I was walking out doing the one-legged wobble...though some leaves and duct tape helped. Anyway, I had another 3,000 miles of travel and I planned to do lots of hiking along the way so I picked up a brand new pair of boots. Layered my socks with the liners on the outside and I did a hike the next day. My feet were pretty swallon after about 7 miles, but a quick dip in a mountain stream reduced that, and I think I did 15 or 20 miles that day with no blisters or hot spots!

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