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Thread: Long Range Shooting

  1. #1

    Default Long Range Shooting

    Thoughts on a long range sheep/antelope gun??

    Accurate, lite and inexpensive. I hate cheap!

    Thanks Louie

  2. #2
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    I've got an takedown HS Precision 7mm STW in the closet. Its neither cheap nor light, but its probably accurate!

  3. #3

    Default Bottom line

    I'm not going to call any caliber "flat shooting" until it launches a bullet faster than 3000fps. And if I read between the lines of what you're looking for 3100-3200fps would probably be better. Make that bullet a minimum of 120 grains and pointed, and there are just a whole bunch of calibers that meet your criteria. Recognize though, that the heavier you make the bullet that's traveling that fast, the more weight you are going to put in the rifle to compensate for recoil.

    Best long range ballistics are going to come from bullets that are long for the caliber, or in other words have higher sectional densities and ballistic coefficients (to reflect their streamlined shape).

    Going on pure theory, then to get the highest possible BC while holding down recoil, I'd call your rifle something no bigger than 7mm, and smaller would be better in terms of recoil and the kind of rifle you could put it in.

    Probably the most overlooked in this category, but the one with the most potential for putting in a lightweight rifle, would be a 25-06 launching 115 grain bullets a little shy of 3100fps out of a 22" barrel. A 257 Weatherby would up that a bit, but to achieve much more you'd probably be talking about a longer barrel.

    Heck, if it was me I'd probably go with a .264 or .277 diameter bullet in the 130 grain class. The classic 270 Winchester and 6.5-06 come to mind but there are others. The reason for that choice is the potential for using heavier bullets when wanted, while the .257 is pretty well tapped out at 120 grains.

    Your choice in how light you want the gun to be and how much recoil you want to endure.

  4. #4
    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    Well you are not very specific about your criteria, but what I consider to be light, accurate, inexpensive and long range is my wife’s Remington Model 7 chambered in 260 Rem. She has the wood and blued version that has had a LOP cut down to fit her small stature (it is now the same length as a youth model) with a Pachmeyer Decelerator pad installed, trigger work by Andy Hawk, custom two piece scope mounts, QRW rings with a Burris 2-7 scope and a Gentry muzzle break. The barrel length is 20” total I think. This little gun shoots great even with its pencil thin barrel and honest 1” three shot groups at 100 yards is common until the barrel heats up after a few groups, then it starts to string them vertically but not bad. For me, long range is 300 yards and this gun will do its job at 300 provided you can find a somewhat steady rest and stay calm. The iron sights are set for 150 yards and she is shooting factory Remington loads with the 140 gr bullet. I seem to remember that all together with the price of the new rifle (this was about 1999 or 2000) and the custom work, scope, mounts etc. she has about $1100 into it. So not exactly “cheap” but well within the grasp of most shooters for a total package kind of thing. This is a really nice rifle to carry around. I have never weighed it, but it cant be much more than 6 or 7 lbs. It is noticeably lighter than my 30-06 700 BDL, and seems like half the size and weight of my Winchester 70 in 375 H&H……….but then again, EVERYTHING seems lighter than that beast. It is also short enough that you can carry it cross ways on the front of an ATV without fear of bending a barrel or snapping the stock should you get a bit to close to a tree.
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

  5. #5
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    Default sheep antelope rifle

    I don't know for sure what it takes for a sheep, but all you need for antelope is a .243 or 6mm. My dad and I have shot quite a few antelope with them. We have also got lots of mule deer with a .243. A .270 would be real good too. My wife has only been hunting a few years and she has shot four antelope with one shot each at an average of around 400 yards.

  6. #6
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    I would build up a Win or Ruger with a Lilja #2 barrel in 270 WSM and drop it in a McMillan edge stock.
    Tennessee

  7. #7

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    I don't consider myself a long-range shooter but I do love the performance of my .25-06. It is a Ruger #1 and definitely NOT a lightweight rifle

    My wife has a 700 TI .270 that is a dream to carry and very accurate out to 200 yards (have not shot it any farther yet). It's the original 700 TI, not the TI Alaskans. I am seriously considering that for a sheep hunt someday.

    Just for discussion, how about the .264 Win Mag as a step up from the .25-06 in terms of long range rifles? I'll admit, I know very little about this cartridge, but I did see some reloading info that put several factory loads at 3200 fps with 140 grain bullets. To get that kind of performance you may need a 26" barrel and that may work against the lightweight requirement.

    I think more so than the caliber is the materials / design of the actual rifle that will really make it lightweight. Replacing a standard stock with a lightweight synthetic, perhaps going with a fluted barrel (and even fluted bolt), etc.

  8. #8

    Default Different

    Do you want to buy commercial manufactured ammo or do you reload? The world of firearms comes alive when you reload.
    Consider these calibers, I believe they fit your needs.

    6.5 - 284 Winchester- short action, standard wildcat
    270 WSM - short action
    270 Winchester - long action
    284 Winchester - Short action
    280 Remington - long action
    300 WSM - Short action

    Short actions tend to reduce overall firearm weight, as do synthetic stocks. Some of the modern ultra light rifles come in at 6 1/2 pounds or so. Most people who have hunted sheep and antelope will tell you that a rifle to do both will be a comprimise at best.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

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  9. #9
    Member moose-head's Avatar
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    Nobody has said Win model 70 sportster in 25-06 117 gr. bullet. (3 gr. shy of BrownBear's minimum but close) I like that because I have that and am very happy with it.

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    While I don't own one and am not a particular fan of the WSM project, I would have to say that something like a Kimber Montana in .270WSM would seem ideal for off the shelf rifle and ammo. Light, flat-shooting and pretty easy to find.

    I do like a lot of the other suggestions...with the .280 Rem.(especially an Ackley Improved), .270 Win. and 6.5-06 or 6.5-.284 being some outstanding long range cartridges.

    No doubt, the most fun of buying a new rifle is doing all the research and himmin and hawwin over which cartridge to get it in!

    Dave

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    I've got a Remington 700 in 7 mag that is the flattest shooting gun I own. Super accurate also. I really like the 7mm remington mag round and would recommend it. As for the weight of the 700, it's 7 1/2 pounds and not difficult to manage.

    Good info on this review of the 7 mag.

    http://www.chuckhawks.com/7mmRemMag.htm

  12. #12
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Kimber Montana 7mm WSM:



    6lbs 3oz

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    Kimber Montana 7mm WSM:
    6lbs 3oz
    I don't want to "disrespect" someone's choice of cartridge, but the 7wsm is pretty much a defunct round. Finding ammo for it is only going to get tougher. If you reload, it's fine, but otherwise I'd go with a more conventional round. The same could be said for the 7STW IMO.

  14. #14
    Member alaskamonte's Avatar
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    Default Well-

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    Kimber Montana 7mm WSM:



    6lbs 3oz

    But in .300 WSM

  15. #15
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default The caliber

    For sheep and Antelope, and Loooong range shooting...270WSM!!!!!

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    I would go with a Remington 700 in 7 Mag just like AFK said. There is not a more useful, long range, all round rifle/cartridge made for the things you are hunting. JMO. J.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskalouie View Post
    Thoughts on a long range sheep/antelope gun??

    Accurate, lite and inexpensive. I hate cheap!

    Thanks Louie

    You have to define long range but I don't think (never seen) inexpensive and long range fit in the same sentence. Maybe define inexpensive, too. I think long range starts at 400 yards.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  18. #18

    Default 7mm

    If you travel to Antelope country, you will probably see more 7mm Rem Mags than all the other calibers mentioned here combined(Except the '06). I've read in several places that in the lower 48 it is 2nd only to the 30-06 in popularity. I've taken over 30 Whitetails with the 7mm and it is by far my favorite caliber.

  19. #19

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    A couple of years back i picked up a carl gustaf .270 win crown grade, 30 years old with barely a box through it. 7.5 lbs scoped, deadly accurate and beautiful to look at! perfect! I would consider 400 yds to be max range when shooting at living things. Past 400 reliably - requires some serious equipment which is never inexpensive.

  20. #20

    Default Another vote for 7mm

    I've shot quite a few critters with one, seen my dad, and both of his brothers shoot many many more critters with the same cartridge, and it definitely gets the job done farther out there than what some people should even consider shooting. It's a flat shooter, easy to find ammo for if you don't reload, and would definitely fill either role quite nicely.
    NRA Life Member, Prior F-16 crew chief.

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