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Thread: anyone challenge the no fillet till dock yet

  1. #1
    Member akriverrat's Avatar
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    Default anyone challenge the no fillet till dock yet

    "until brought to shore and offloaded, no person may fillet, mutilate, or otherwise disfigure a halibut in any many that prevents determination of the number of fish caught or possessed".

    anyone get checked while you had your halibut filleted in a manner where you could tell the number possesed? like four complete fillets two white and two brown or even fillet your halibut in two full side pieces, one white half and one brown half? the way the law reads it seems like if you pull over to any beach and fillet your fish and long as you dont fillet it in the boat you should be ok. bigger fish are of course harder to keep in whole fillets so those should probably be left alone unless you dont mind folding them in your cooler. id rather keep mine flat and stacked meat to meat skin to skin with a liner inbetween. just wondering if anyone has abided by the law while at the same time questioning it and what the outcome was.

  2. #2
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Simple

    It is rather simple. If you are out and need to fillet your halibut in an effort to prevent waste, fillet it. BUT, in doing so, keep each of the four fillets whole so that the number of fish can be determined.

    If you chop it up into blocks, so that the total number of fish can not be determined, you are going to get a ticket.

    The troopers do understand that fish needs to be iced on long trips for proper meat care. Sometimes, due to the size of the fish, it will just not fit into the cooler unless you fillet it. Your responsibility is to the resource.

    ADD ON: Actually I asked the troopers that patrol PWS and this is the answer I got. And in 6 years out there, no one has ever checked my cooler. It must be my honest face or they think I can't catch fish. ;D

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  3. #3
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    Default

    Um, no. Are you a cop?

  4. #4

    Default

    Dave,

    Though that maybe the LOGICAL thinking that you or I might have.

    I wouldnt go off and publically post this as a moderator of this forum you could easily get sued for it!

    As a boat skipper running daily they checked us. They also were watching the fish cleaning docks on a fairly regular basis.

  5. #5
    New member Todd Anchorage's Avatar
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    Default On ship fillets

    Never been checked in nearly 8 years of fishing in Seward and Whittier. I prefer cleaning my fish at sea and avoid the tourists and the questions from other fisherman. I'm not a recluse, but have you ever cleaned your fish in Whittier? Give me a break.

  6. #6
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    Default

    I guess I need to read the rule book again. I have always felt that you can fillet your halibut on the boat as long as you can distinguish the amount of fish caught just like Dave said. Two white and two dark fillets per fish and you are good to go.

  7. #7
    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    Default Walking the line

    Things over the last few years in Seward have really changed. We have a State Trooper who enthuastically enforces fisheries laws as they apply to sportfishermen. It really is not a bad thing once you get used to it. We also have an extremely enthuastic NMFS enforcment officer who just got a sweet new safeboat for patrolling the waters near Seward.

    So I can saw with personal expereince, if you violate any single fisheries law in Seward, you will be going to court and paying fines.

    It has been an expensive few years for me in Seward but with that said, I now understand every single nuance of the law as it relates to charterboats and hey...If you don't get caught once in a while, maybe you are not trying hard enough.....

    Seriously. break the law in Seward and you will pay for it! Especially if you salmon fish with more rods than there are fishermen in the boat..

  8. #8

    Default

    It's exactly as Dave said. I asked a Trooper about it one time.

  9. #9
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    Default

    [quote=AKCAPT;204803]We also have an extremely enthuastic NMFS enforcment officer who just got a sweet new safeboat for patrolling the waters near Seward.

    NMFS = No More Fishing Service Thats what i think of that outfit.

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  10. #10

    Question pinched for filleting?

    I've seen this debate on regulation interpretation several times before. The trooper I talked with several years ago out in PWS indicated the 4-fillet per fish was within the regulation requirements. I can understand a charter with a bunch of folks on board could be a nightmare for an enforcement inspection, but a private boat on a multi-day outing is a different story. Has anyone on this forum actually been cited/or paid a fine for filleting at sea on a multi-day trip?

  11. #11
    Member akriverrat's Avatar
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    Default

    the last three years of me going out of whittier i have never even been checked. i got boarded by the coast guard on the way out two years ago but thats it. i have been filleting my fish at home actually but im not going to do it anymore, too much a pain dealing with the carcass and clean up ect. i clean all my fish at sea but been filleting at home just because i dont have the facitlities or room on board to accomplish filleting out halibut on board. even multiple slamon can be a chore and filleting on the beach is just throwing away good meat on every fish. plus the bugs are usually eating you alive while you are trying to fillet your catch. the filleting tables at the dock i can see as it being a long process waiting first of all then telling your story over and over till you are done. when i get to whittier i am ready to get my boat on my trailer and get through that tunnel. keeping it 2 white and two brown fillets should be good enough for them, thats the way i read it anyway.

  12. #12

    Default

    cut up many many many fish everyday for yrs, never had a problem

  13. #13
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    Default

    Jeez just keep the carcass. That way you can fillet it and also prove how big, and how many animals were filleted. I could have sworn I saw a bulliten from ADF&G last year about this, but didn't pay much attention as I didn't think I'd go halibut fishing. Throw the carcass away once docked.

    Let me know if this makes sense. Maybe one of the actual enforecment folks would answer? there must be some who read this.

  14. #14

    Default IPHC Annual Meetings clarifies regulations on filleting

    From the IPHC 2008 Annual Meeting Announcement

    For Alaska, the Commission adopted a sport regulation that no person shall possess on board a fishing vessel, including charter vessels and pleasure craft, halibut that has been filleted, mutilated, or otherwise disfigured in any manner except that each halibut may be cut into no more than two ventral and two dorsal pieces and two cheeks, all with skin on. The change allows enforcement officers to count the number of fish possessed by an angler. Additionally, in Area 2C the NMFS regulation that requires charter vessels to retain halibut carcasses remains in effect unless superseded by new NMFS regulations.

  15. #15

    Angry

    So, does this mean no fresh halibut for dinner while boating out in PWS?

    I understand the regulation, but it goes way over the top IMO. It will be a very sad day when you can't even consume your fresh harvest on the water, and it seems that day is here.

    Good luck enforcing it.

  16. #16
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default No

    No it does not prevent you from cooking some for dinner. If you are worried about someone saying something, save the skin on the one you cook. Humm... I have 2 white fillets, one green with meat and one green with no meat because I cooked it = 4 fillets. I don't think anyone can fine you for having less than the total number of fillets per limit.

    We often cook fish and shrimp when out. If that is where you are going to consume it, go for it.

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  17. #17
    Member fishin 45's Avatar
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    Default

    If the new reg goes through that say we can only keep one halibut over 32 inches and one under the fillet question will probably go away. We would have to save the carcass.

  18. #18
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default This is what I found

    I see not Sport Fishing Regualtion for retention of 32" fish.

    INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC HALIBUT COMMISSION

    PACIFIC HALIBUT FISHERY REGULATIONS 2007
    http://www.iphc.washington.edu/halco...07iphcregs.pdf
    25. Sport Fishing for Halibut
    (1) No person shall engage in sport fishing for halibut using gear other than a single line with no
    more than two hooks attached; or a spear.
    (2) In all waters off Alaska
    (a) the sport fishing season is from February 1 to December 31;
    (b) the daily bag limit is two halibut of any size per day per person.


    Also

    (7) In Alaska no person shall fillet, mutilate, or otherwise disfigure a halibut in any manner that
    prevents the determination of minimum size or the number of fi sh caught while on board the
    catcher vessel.
    (8) The possession limit for halibut in the waters off the coast of Alaska is two daily bag limits.

    NMFS could implement more restrictive regulations for the sport fishery or components of it, therefore anglers are advised to check the current federal or state regulations prior to fishing.
    Last edited by Daveinthebush; 02-04-2008 at 18:25. Reason: Added also

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  19. #19
    Member FISHFOOL's Avatar
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    Default Eight Day Trips

    We are out for eight days at a time and have to fillet, butcher, vacuum seal and freeze on the boat. When we return to shore our fish is frozen except for what we catch the day of returning. Is vacuum sealing considered processed?
    According to the Fish & Game frozen solid is considered processed.
    When I am at risk is from the time the fish is filleted to the time it is frozen solid. I have no choice unless I freeze whole fillets and butcher once back at shore.

  20. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FISHFOOL View Post
    We are out for eight days at a time and have to fillet, butcher, vacuum seal and freeze on the boat. When we return to shore our fish is frozen except for what we catch the day of returning. Is vacuum sealing considered processed?
    According to the Fish & Game frozen solid is considered processed.
    When I am at risk is from the time the fish is filleted to the time it is frozen solid. I have no choice unless I freeze whole fillets and butcher once back at shore.
    My understanding is that vacum sealing alone is not considered processing. It has to be frozen, or canned, cooked, or...?

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