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Thread: Cam-corder question

  1. #1
    Member tjm's Avatar
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    Default Cam-corder question

    Does the media you record on affect quality? For example 8mm, 8mm HD, Hard drive, mini disk, etc. I am looking for the best quality video in the consumer price range (less than $1000). Should I only focus on which camera has the best lens or should the recording format also be a decision maker. I'd like the convenience of a hard drive style but not at the expense of video quality. Or will I not be able to tell the difference between most of the cameras in my price range?

  2. #2
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default media for digital not as important as analog

    With digital video, the recording media doesn't make nearly as much difference as it does with good old analog video. For instance, when recording with the same analog format, magnetic recording Hi8 camera, you can visually tell the difference between standard 8mm tape and Hi8 tape during playback on a full-size TV screen. With a digital recording, you wouldn't see any difference between DV and hard drive recording. The quality of the digital recording is determined by the hardware of the camera, not the media. So focus on the hardware and camera first, then match up the recording media based on how you will process it after the fact or how much video you'll be recording in a single field session. You can go a long time by popping in new discs vs. having to download video to a computer and then erase your drive or memory.
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  3. #3
    Member tjm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    So focus on the hardware and camera first, then match up the recording media based on how you will process it after the fact or how much video you'll be recording in a single field session.
    thanks for the reply...now that I know that the media isn't important I guess I'll ask if you have any recommendations on cameras....you asked how I will process it and how much I'll record in a session.....

    I will be using final cut express to edit...
    I will shoot no more than a few hours between trips to my computer...

    I really see no need for an HD camera for my application so am I looking for the camera with the best lens only?...I hear a lot of chatter about the cannon HV20 (HD?..will that give me any issues editing/making a DVD)...any thoughts

    one last thing...I currently use an old Cannon Elura 70 miniDV...I would be using that as a 2nd camera so that footage will be cut with footage from the new camera.....does that matter or should I stick with cannon, I've read that different manufacturers may have a different 'look' (cooler,sharper)...anything to that?....

    thanks again
    tjm

  4. #4
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default

    I can't give you much advice on specific digital video cameras. My current video camera is analog with magnetic tape and I'm shopping for a digital camera upgrade myself. Lens quality is certainly at the top of the list, but with all the features available on modern cameras, you have to take the whole package into account, including the recording format, battery type & life, lighting, user interface, zoom type, etc.

    Can't tell you if HD will create editing problems, but there is a significant format difference between HD and standard video. If your editing software can handle HD, then it can probably work with both formats together, though it will probably make you "downsize" the HD to a standard resolution. The final output would naturally have to be a single resolution.

    As for the "look" of the video from different cameras, this is true to an extent. Analog video was certainly more prone to this, but different lenses will also give different appearance to the finished product. Unless you're trying to make a blockbuster movie, I doubt I would be too worried about it.

    Hopefully others will chime in with some more specific experiences...
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    Member Alasken's Avatar
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    tjm,

    If you know you're going to be using Final Cut Express go to Apple's web site and see what cameras are compatible with that software. I know they have that info for FCP, so I would guess they have it for express also.

    Ken
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  6. #6
    Member tjm's Avatar
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    Default

    thanks again for the insight guys....I appreciate it..

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