Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: build from scratch?

  1. #1
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,133

    Default build from scratch?

    Not much for choices out there in the small bore world.

    Everything out there is not exactly what I want.

    I want my gun to be hawken style, carbine, 32 cal, percussion, and as much stainless as I can get on it.

    Whats a good book/video to get to tell me how to order everything I need plus instructions.

    My buddies dad made him a muzzloader from scratch. And I mean scratch. He even carved the stock froma solid piece of wood. Ill try to get ahold of him too. I asked him this summer about it. He said he just got a book. His rifles came out really nice. And accurate.

    Course the guy is a genius, seriously, he is one of the smartest people I have ever known.

  2. #2

    Default Catalogue

    A good primer to muzzleloading fiearms and available parts is the DIXIE GUN WORKS catalogue. They carry the kits and parts you'll need. It also offers a wealth of info on historic accuracy and accessories.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  3. #3
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,133

    Default

    I just discovered track of the wolf. They have a super nice catalog. 400 plus pages, it almost looks like a book. Full color photos, super nice. Only 7 bucks. Im gonna order that one for sure. http://www.trackofthewolf.com/(S(ulb...artNum=catalog

  4. #4

    Default

    Yeah, TOW is the first place I go when looking for stuff. Some of their kits come in 32. Your biggest hassle is going to be finding stainless steel parts. I haven't checked but Muzzleloader Builders Supplies probably has the widest parts supply, and might be a source. A quick call to them might reveal another source if there is one.

    I'm real fond of the 32 too, but when I get around to building one my first criteria is going to be light weight, or at least good balance. Steel and weight build up fast as barrel diamter goes up. You just wouldn't believe how heavy a 15/16" 32 cal barrel is for the TC Hawken, available as a drop-in replacement from Green Mountain. If you're building a 32, I'd find the skinniest barrel I could. The 3/4" x 32" barrel on my Traditions Crockett results in just about the perfect mix of weight and balance. That will be my prefered size when I do a build. If you want a short cut to a 32 while making decisions about which one to build, I'd consider picking up a Crockett and refinishing that to suit your tastes. The cheapest place I have seen them is Midsouth Shooting Supply and in fact where I bought mine. Not as nice a scratch built could be, but a relatively cheap way to get into a 32 while getting some finishing practice. Mine is a tack driver at hunting ranges.

    Jim Chambers is one of the most highly regarded choices for kits, both for quality of kits and design. I've been looking hard at his Isaac Haynes, but will have to go with a 40 or 45 cal rather than a 32 if I go that route, since that model is not available smaller.

    Tennessee Valley Muzzleloading or TVM is also very highly regarded, and many of their styles are available in 32, as well as with small barrels. It's kind of a wierd site to navigate. Pick one of the styles in the pop down menu, then hit the "Come See" button. To look at the next style, you have to hit your back button to return to the home page, then use the same two step process to look at the next one.

  5. #5
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,133

    Default

    I might have to go with the crockett to get my feet wet and satisfy my curiousity. That TVM Jaeger rifle sure looks sweet, and its the first one I have seen available in 32.

  6. #6

    Default

    Jaegers tend to be pretty heavy, but that shoudn't be an issue if they use the smaller barrel. And you're right, a 32 Jaeger ought to be sweet! Tennessee and southern mountain rifles in general are usually available in small bores, and several I have handled were really nicely balanced, even with their longer bore.

    If you go with the Crockett, holler. There are some small "fine tuning" details in the way you care and feed for them that are worth knowing. I'm up to 5 for 6 now on Crocketts. Five of the six friends who have handled mine went out and bought their own right way. They are just way too sweet. The Blue Ridge rifles (actually highly regarded Pedersoli's) from Cabelas are available in 32, both flint and cap. I'm tempted, but they're getting so expensive that you can put together a high quality kit for little more.

  7. #7

    Default

    if you're going to build I'd highly recommend Wallace Gusslers building the KY Rifle. I have the carving video, very very detailed! Going to order this video also. It has come with regards to a few of the present day building greats!

  8. #8
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    My friend Fritz has a 32 hes uses as a target/squirrel gun real tack driver. He made his from scratch not a kit. One of my fondest memories of deer hunting was when I was first starting out and couldn't afford a new rifle. I bought a 54cal hawken kit from tc. I was working tons of over time so I could take a few days off to hunt and ended up assembling the kit in Fritz's basement the day before we were to start our hunt. Fritz and I worked all night on it and in the morning sighted it in then got some shut eye. That evening we got out in the field and spotted a few bucks that were out of range. The next am I shot my first black powder buck a OK 4 point not huge but considering I had assembled my first black powder rifle, sighted it in and harvested a deer all within 48 hours I think I did well. BTW I did a little tweaking on the gun and traded it with my Dad for a Springfield 30-06. Dumb dumb dumb.
    BHA Member
    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

  9. #9
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,133

    Default

    Cool story rick. Im in the process of liquidating a few unneccsary centerfires so I can get that 32 muzzleloader.

  10. #10

    Default

    Keep us posted what you do and how you progress, Matt. I'm determined that 2008 is going to be the year I get to build my 32 caliber leftie flinter, so I'm giong to be taking lots of notes.

  11. #11
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    I'll keep an eye on your progress too my Friend Fritz is a black powder only guy and has built several gun. I could always refer questions too him.
    BHA Member
    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

  12. #12
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,133

    Default

    Well, I just visited a friend of my Dads to pick his brain about muzzleloader construction. I got to view several complete samples including one in .36 cal.

    I got to see a couple of stocks in various stages of completion.

    And the tools required wich does not appear to be much.

    The 36 that he had was his first build and it was gorgous. It was a curly maple stock that had a unique look to it. He hand carved it using his own design kinda of Hawken style but more modern is the only way I can describe it from a blank with only 3 different chisels and a 4" bench vice. The stock also had a few homade brass inlays (he even gave me a sheet of brass so I could do some on my own. The end cap on the stock was a lead inlay that he did. The ramrod had a neat design he did with a rope wrapped around it that he caught on fire. A homemade Leather sling. And plum brown Swamped barrel of probably 24" length. It was a percusion lock with a sweet trigger.

    Anyway, he gave me lots of confidence and an open door policy to ask questions. So Im gonna take the plunge here. The wood work is the most daunting to me but he says its no sweat. Just go slow.

    So to encourage me to go slow I just secured a CVA squirrel rifle to have fun with while I do my build.

    I plan on writing up a pictorial essay of what I did and what was involved.

    And next time Im over at that mans house Im taking some pictures of the rifles he has made. They are truly impressive. He gave me a book called the art of the pensilvania long rifle wich he said is all he had when he got into it. That is also impressive!

    Sorry for the spelling and grammer. My essay will be correctly spelled and in proper english! Im just tired and semi lazy when it comes to these posts. HAHA
    Last edited by rimfirematt; 03-17-2008 at 19:29. Reason: im an idiot

  13. #13

    Default

    Matt,

    There is a couple videos on builds. I'll have to dig them up info wise.

    Here they are:

    http://smartflix.com/store/video/217...Kentucky-Rifle

    There are others on the link. If you need more check out dixie or track of the wolf. Or try American Longrifles in a google search should pull up the web page on top.


    I have one that is from a partial kit. meaning there is metal work and plenty of wood work left to be done. not quite like a cabelas kit where everthing fits, you finish sand, stain and move on, these need fitting, drilling, tapping. Kind of a nice place to start for a first build.

    Try chambers flintlocks to get you going on places for info......good peoples!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •