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Thread: Ruger M77 Mark II VS. Tikka T3 Lite

  1. #1

    Default Ruger M77 Mark II VS. Tikka T3 Lite

    I'm thinking of selling my Ruger M77 Mark II in order to get a Tikka T3 Lite both are in .338. The Ruger is nice but at 8.25#s just the gun that 6.5# gun is looking mighty fine to carry. What is your guys take between the two?

  2. #2
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    Is it possible to shoot the Tikka in .338 or similar caliber before purchase? You may want a bit heavier gun due to the recoil.

    Sako1

  3. #3

    Default Yeah it was possible

    My friend has one in .338. Its pretty nice and with the recoil pad it isn't too bad.

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    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    I would never get rid of my M77. I love that gun too much. Ruger makes a ultra light M77. Not sure if they offer it in .338, but my 30-06 is one, and it only weighs 6.5 lbs.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
    I am a shoveler's worst nightmare!

  5. #5

    Default t3 338

    I just bought a t3 in 338wm and had the limb saver recoil installed. I have not shot it yet. I am waiting on a little warmer weather to break in the barrel properly. If you want to shoot it you are welcome too.

  6. #6

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    IMO of all the rifles I have ever squeezed the trigger on (and thats a lot!) the most unenjoyable rifle I have ever fired is the Tikka T3 Lite in 338WM. I own a Ruger M77 338WM and can shoot it all day long, my buddies Tikka was absolutely zero fun to shoot. But YMMV.

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    Sometimes I want to respond, but I donít, because I think maybe I not expert enough to contribute anything meaningful.

    This could be one of those times, but given my 338 experience, I sure donít want one in a light-weight rifle.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
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    You can't out-give God.

  8. #8

    Default Light .338s.

    I have never shot a Tikka. The way a rifle is stocked makes a big difference in how the recoil affects the shooter. This varies from shooter to shooter, with the same stock, depending on build and fit. A good quality recoil pad makes a difference, sometimes a big one. I do the recoil pad first (remember to take off a bit of stock before you install a thicker pad, to avoid problems when you wear winter clothes. Put on your winter clothes and measure your ideal length of pull, then replicate it from trigger to the end of the butt with pad taped on.

    If that doesn't take the cuss off it, consider a good muzzle brake. I don't have much hearing left to lose, but when I shoot a rifle with a muzzle brake on the range, I use ear-plugs and ear-muffs. In the field, hunting, I just tough it out.

    Use a scope with plenty of eye relief.

    Start with reduced loads and work up. Get comfortable shooting it offhand before you put in a lot of bench time.
    Jack.

  9. #9

    Default EEuuh!

    Ma...m...ma...ma...mama says muzzle breaks are the devil! Hurt my ears too much. Bad. Bad. Bad.

  10. #10
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Default This will be interesting, keep us posted

    My two favorite hunting rifles are my Ruger MKII in .338WM and my Tikka T-3 in .300WM. Which one I grab depends on how much (how high actually) I will be hiking and how big the local critters may be. The rifles are very different, but in these calibers, recoil and accurate shooting are not an issue with either. ( other than the classic crummy Ruger trigger, which is fixable). It has occured to me before that if I got a Tikka in .338 I could condense my rifle population significantly...probably why I haven't done it. one issue mentioned by others has been falure of tikka rings especially in .338, so recommondation has been get talleys etc. No issue with mine so far.

  11. #11

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    Dave I have owned 4 Tikkas (Yeah I know I'm crazy) a 300WM, a 7mm, and 2 different 270 Winchesters (one stainless and one blued). The 300WM was shootable though it has some punch to it, the 338WM my bud has( Limbsaver and all) with appropriate 338 loads (250 grain anything) is brutal, seriously. If you can shoot more than 3 shots without flinching seriously affecting your accuracy you are the man! Compared side by side with a M70 375 H&H (been there done that) the Tikka wins in the brutal department. I would say that in order to tame that rifle to a gun you like to shoot, a MB or some kind Porting is a must for "most" guys. Trust me I am no puss when it comes to recoil, but the 338WM in the Tikka T3 Lite is brutal. It does all the bad things a heavy recoiler does, it shoves harshly, the muzzle jumps, and you know what your getting yourself into for the next shot. Can a guy suck it up and deal with for that one shot in the field, I guess, but who wants to own a gun like that? When you can have another type of rifle in 338WM that you enjoy shooting, like your Ruger and mine.

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    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Fair enough, I bow to the voice of experiance and reason. Plus who needs only one rifle! One flaw/trade off of all lightweight rifle is they are not as steady to hand in field positions. Definately not an issue with the Ruger.

  13. #13
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    A buddy of mine recently bought a 338 Tikka and had a brake put on (and limbsaver pad) before he ever fired the first shot. One of my co-workers brothers runs a gun shop down here and said that the majority of the 338 Tikkas he sells end up back in the shop for a muzzle brake.

    I have a Tikka in 300wsm and it's got a bit of pop to it when I start getting close to my max loads while I'm working up new handloads, but not near bad enough to need a brake on it. I do have a LimSaver recoil pad on it.

    I really like the Tikkas, but big cartridges and light guns can hurt.

  14. #14
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    IMO, keep the Ruger. You shoot it well and it works for ya. All you'll gain from the tikka is a lighter wallet and a loss of 1.75 pounds. The ruger is easy to shoot and if you ask Kyle C about it, he did say it was an absolute MULE to shoot before he had to add stuff to it. I realize yours has a brake but you'll probably have to put one on the tikka also.

  15. #15

    Default Love my Ruger...

    When I went shopping for a .338, I checked out several models, including the Ruger and the Tikka. I know Tikkas are quality rifles, but when I held it in my hands the stock felt flimsy, and the safety felt kind of cheap to me. I know it's not, but I didn't like how it felt in my hands or when shouldered.

    I went with the Ruger, have a 1.5-6x scope on mine and love it. yes it's heavier, but I like its feel and like how it shoots. For me, it's a keeper.

  16. #16

    Default Tikka .338

    From what I have read by people who own them, they kick like hell. I ever remember reading that the calibers above .300 in the tikka's were having some issues with the actions. As far as I'm concerned, the tikka t3 in .300wsm is the best deal going, but I don't think I would get it in .338. Too light for sure.

    And by the way, the tikka stocks are crap. I haven't found a replacement stock for mine yet. I broke mine and ended up fiberglassing it back together. Called tikka about a replacement and the stock was $440. I paid 630 for rifle. I asked, so I can buy a barrel and action for $190??? You can guess what the answer to that was! Anyone see any after market stocks for the tikka t3???

  17. #17
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    How about $100 for a replacement magazine?
    What were the issues on with the actions?
    I love my T3lite stainless in 7mmRM, but i would never buy one in anything larger (mag. calibers anyway)

  18. #18

    Default Tikka Stock

    Northway,

    That's the reaction I had when I picked up a Tikka - it felt kinda like my old Crosman BB gun with the plastic stock. I couldn't shake that feeling, and the safety and bolt felt flimsy to me, so I went with the Ruger.

  19. #19

    Default yes

    I agree on the stock. My daughter had it laying across her lap as I was driving the 6 wheeler and it hit a trees. We were not going fast and it took a big chunk out! I was pissed. I wasn't going to pay for another one of those stocks, so just fiberglassed it and it has worked great for 5 years now. I actually am impressed with the bolt and safety. The action on the bolt is smoother than any other factory rifle I have picked up. It is much smoother than my remingtons.

  20. #20
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    I have some experience here. I recently purchased a Tikka T3 in 300 WSM. I did so mainly because of the Sako reputation for quality and because it was the only 300 WSM available locally in a left-handed model.

    As I handled this rifle and took the action out of the stock to inspect the bedding, I was dis-heartened to see the lack of structural integrity in the stock, as well as the apparent weaknesses in the bolt and receiver. I took the rifle to a gunsmith for evaluation and did some research of my own. What we found out was that this rifle has a quality barrel typical of the Sako reputation, but that is where the term quality ends as an appropriate descriptor for this Berettat-induced blot on Sako's heretofor fine name.

    Aside from the flimsey stock, there is a real issue with the way the bedding block is set up. My gunsmith feels (and so do several researchers) that the rifle has a potential to "twist" when fired which could cause inconsistant bolt to barrel alignment shot-to-shot, particularly when considered in relation to the inferior design of the receiver. Add to this plastic magazine (outrageously expensive to replace or get extras of), plastic parts on the bolt, and not what I would call "great' scope rings, and this could be the biggest potential "loser" in rifle-dom history.

    In any event, I traded this rifle in for a Ruger M77 Mark II in 300 Win Mag, and I am so glad that I did. Much better overall quality and a considerably stronger receiver, bolt, and a e position safety as well.

    As far as accuracy, buying production rifles today can be a crapshoot as far as accuracy is concerned. I suggest doing the following inexpensive procedures for almost any production rifle. Buy and use David Tubb's 50 round Final FInish barrel lapping system, load and fire them through your gun as directed. That alone will improve the accuracy by removing the factory tool marks left in the barrel. Next, reload your own ammunition specific for your needs at 82% of sammi maximum pressures for the particular cartridge and bullets you use (this info is available on any reputable reloading charts/software). Also, for large calibre rifles, purchase and use a Caldwell Lead Sled DFT on a well-constructed shooting table. Big rifles do punch and this will keep you from flinching. Another area of concern is the optics, don't scrimp here. I have a Kahles 2-7X36mm scope that is perfect for this rifle. A very common mistake folks make is to buy a scope well beyond what they need, using the philosophy that "bigger is better". Scopes that are bigger thatn 36mm, or that have power ranges beyond 3 by 9 are a waste of time and money for most shooters, and may even prove to be counter productive. I love the optics and clarity of my Kahles, but Swarovski, Leupold, Zeiss, Nikon and Burris, just to mention a few will all do nicely.

    The whole point is you want a quality experience without getting ripped-off and buying a lot of stuff you don't need. My Ruger Mark II consistently shoots sub MOA groups at 200 yards firing either 200gr. SPBT's, or 165gr. HPBT's, and I didn't pay an arm and a leg for it. Find a gun you like, take a few inexpensive steps to accurize it and be happy. DON'T BUY JUNK.

    brad53

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