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Thread: Dura-coat-----

  1. #1
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    Default Dura-coat-----

    I am thinking about using Dura-Coat on a 45/70 SS guide gun but have never done used it before. Has anyone used this product and/or is there a better product out there that can be done as a "weekend job"? I know some products involve baking, sandblasting etc. I have seen some results but having never used small air spray guns I dont know how hard it would be or if I have the patience Any comments will help
    Thanks
    RC

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    I have done Lauers coatings on 2 rifles and 1 revolver-holding up well especially my hard used Win. 94 .30-30AI. That rifle I gave a 2-tone, combat black/OD grn.

    Your best results will come from proper metal preparations and use vinyl gloves prior to spraying the coating. I done 2 even coatings and heated them over my wood stove over night and left alone in the gun rack for sometime before shooting.

    I am giving "rust" bluing a try now, small parts first.

    you should do well-just don't spray in the house-it is toxic.(wear a mask of your choosing and goggles perhaps)

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    Default coat

    Do you have to "bake" Dura-Coat? Is Lauer the same thing?

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    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    give gunsmith Andy Hawk a call in Anchorage, I think he has been using this process, or a similar one for some time now and should have some examples in his shop, or tips on application.
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Default easy

    I have done it and it is very easy. A respirator and a lot of ventilation would be a great idea. I would even consider making a exhaust, vented paint booth out of a box. The fumes were pretty overwhelming. We practiced on a couple of snake charmers, but I would not hesitate to spray one of my nicer guns. I can post a pic or two of the finished product if you would like.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  6. #6

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    I have used Gun Coat, purchased it at Brownell's. A little messy and you have to bake it but it seems to provide a very uniform and so far durable finish. I bought the spray cans so I did not have to mess with a small sprayer. I do not recommend doing it on a winter day when you cannot open the windows! I sent the wife shopping for a few hours and by the time she came home you could not even tell I had done it!

  7. #7

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    Black Ice coatings. I am very happy

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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    I've done a couple of my guns in Duracoat. I did a shotgun, .22 pistol, and a bolt action rifle. It's pretty easy, and it's not all that difficult to get nice looking results, but I'm not really happy with it on the bolt action rifle. The action gets "sticky" in cold weather.

    The last time I was a Sportsman's Warehouse, I saw some Duracoat kits on their counter. I didn't really check them out throughly, but I'm pretty sure it was Duracoat stuff. If you can buy it locally, you can save a bunch on shipping charges. Haz-Mat fees are expensive!

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    Quote Originally Posted by xmohuntr View Post
    Do you have to "bake" Dura-Coat? Is Lauer the same thing?
    not required with the airbrush Coat, with the cans yes. I suspended the parts above my wood stove to get it to "setup" good before I put it away. The Win. 94 is a good example of how resilient the DuraCoat is, the loading gate is the only part that is showing some wear-after a couple of years in a boat and ATV it proves to be good product.

  10. #10
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    FWIW I'm still happy with an Ithaca 37 I stripped and shot a couple of coats of rustoleum on 25 years ago. It has lead a rough life too. No baking and touch up is easy.

  11. #11

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    My gun boot had a bit of mud and water in the bottom and I didnt know while i was driving around with my Ruger .338. Long story short, it got wet and rusted on the end. We sanded it down and sprayed it. Also sprayed the synthetic stock. That was 2 years ago. I drag it through the woods, beat and bang it around, a real poor example...and it holds up great.
    It is better to bake it some sort of way, but it isnt necessary, just a better looking and little stronger bond. Hanging above the stove over night is great.

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