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Thread: Wood/Diesel Boiler help

  1. #1
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    Default Wood/Diesel Boiler help

    need help/advice..
    I am planning on setting up a walk thru with Frontier Heating in Palmer and looking at his Central Boilers, I have heard nothing but good of good things about them, but I want to get some more options/advice before choosing one. One problem I see with the Outside boiler is It would be hard for the wife to load it...or yeah she bucks wood pretty good, but this might be a little much*cold, wet you know what I'm saying..I was thinking of an inside wood/diesel boiler that would be set in the shop. I could then set the front end loader bucket up so it could be loaded easier.

    I'm having trouble finding local sales and service in Alaska for a dual fuel inside boiler set up.

    Natural gas is not an option in the little Su area. I have a 2200 sq.ft house and am building a 1800 sq.ft. shop 30X60 (no more -40 changing a starter!!). I'm going to have radiant floor heat in the shop and between floor joist heat in the house. Currently were heating with a soap stone cast iron and Toyo.

    I've looked at UAA rural development wood energy/ Rural Energy in Anchorage TARM usa, and at the Maine wood boilers.I've also look at Talkeetna, Soldotna and at heatland in Anchorage but haven't found any inside wood boilers.

    I'm looking for one that is durable and proven. If you know of one or are using one now Let me know

    It's important to find a local business that will be around. Thanks

  2. #2
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    I have a Tarm Solo 40 gasification boiler. The gasification boilers are more efficient and burn a lot cleaner than the outdoor boilers. There is no smoke and no creosote. They burn lots less wood than an outdoor boiler since they gasify the smoke in a secondary burn.

    The downside is that you need to burn dry wood. Cost is usually less for a gasification unit, but it needs to be in a house, shed, garage etc...

    The Boiler Room forum at www.hearth.com has a ton of info on wood boilers of all kinds.

    Hope this helps

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogballs View Post

    The Boiler Room forum at www.hearth.com has a ton of info on wood boilers of all kinds.
    Dog,
    Thanks for the above link...I've started to research some outdoor boiler options and this will be helpful.

  4. #4
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    I had an outdoor wood boiler when I lived back in Michigan and the stoves have their pros and cons. On the pro side, I could burn any kind of wood or wood product in the stove and it didn't have to be cut a certain size. If it went in the door, it would burn. Scrap pieces of wood, branches, grass clippings, rotted wood, ect went through the stove with no problem and it helped keep my small woodlot cleaner and got rid of stuff for neighbors who had blowdowns in their yards. Even poor burning wood like willow or bam could go through the stove with a proper mix of wood. Like was said, the wood doesn't have to be fully dry but green wood didn't burn as well either. wood that was semi-dry gave the longest burn times. I usually tried to mix hard and softwoods together. I checked the stove twice a day for wood but the stove could burn at least 24 hours with coals left. Another pro is that smoke and bugs from the wood are kept outside so there is less mess in the house. You also could not run out of hot water with the stove running. I had a heat exchanger for an indoor propane boiler. I kept my house and garage heated along with a zone in the garage approach to clean that off, that better than shoveling.

    The cons are that an outdoor boiler will burn at least twice the wood of an indoor stove, more depending on how much are heating. Hopefully you have a good wood source. Watch the water that you fill the stove with as well as using the correct additive to that water. My cousin had a stove rot from the waterjacket side out into the firebox and I am aware of 4 different brands that this happened to so it is not unique to any one stove. It sure would be tough to see a 4 year old stove leak water into the firebox, so check out the warranty carefully as well.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for all the Info, PM's and advive.

    One product I found that were looking into is the Seton Boiler from www.rohor.com . There made in Montana, from a guy that lived up here Fairbanks, Delta, & Tok. They don't have the dual fuel option, but you can tie in into a proven boiler; ie weil-mclane. They are distributed here in Alaska. This info may help someone in search of a boiler.

  6. #6
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    Default Gasification technology

    Gasification technology is at the forefront in the efforts to develop alternatives for conventional furnaces. It is of particular interest because it offers an opportunity to use the product fuel gas in integrated gasification combined-cycle electric power generation (IGCC). Great hopes are pinned on IGCC as a highly efficient and low polluting emissions technology.





    __________________
    Greentech are specialists in a range of Gasification Boilers Services.



  7. #7
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    Default Garn Boilers......

    are spendy' but they would do what you're asking. Here's an article about a Kenai Peninsula installation:

    http://www.peninsulaclarion.com/stor...ews_4653.shtml

    Dave

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