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Thread: 204 Ruger

  1. #1

    Default 204 Ruger

    A new Rem 700 SS fluted light varminter came my way a month ago. A trip to the range proved it to be a real shooter with the hornady 32 gr V max bullets.
    Durying the last couple of weeks I have shot 3 coyotes with this gun and have come to the conclusion that this aint enough gun for song dogs. Two of the coyotes were running broadside at distances of between 100-150 yards. Both were hit in the front shoulder and promptly went down but both got back to their feet and required a coupe degrace to the noggin! The third one happend this morning. He was 300 yards out going straight away and I hit him right where his tail hooks on at. I heard the bullet go whop and saw the fur fly but he kept his legs under him and at this very moment he is in a brush pile somewhere licking his *****! The other two dead coyotes upon examination looked like they had a cherry bomb go of on their shoulder...very little penetration.

    For several years prior to this 204 I was killing coyotes with my 223 shooting 40 gr Nosler BT's. There is no doubt in my mind that all three of these coyotes were one shot kills with the 223.

    Confidence is everything, so next weekend ole betsy (rem 700 varminter) comes out of retirement and the 204 goes on the shelf. I might even trade it of for a dog and then shoot the dog!

  2. #2

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    I've got a .204 too and it works great on fox, but have often wondered how it would do on coyotes and or wolves. I am always of the belief that put in the right place (behind the shoulder) it'll do the job cuz they do gernade a bit, but as you described, getting them bigger canines to stay still while you shoot em aint always the case.

  3. #3
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    Default 204 Ruger

    elmerkeithclone, You may want to try a different bullet, such as Nosler's 40 grain Ballistic Tip. The A-Max is excellent on smaller varmits, but seems a bit fragile for coyotes. I haven't shot the 204 Ruger, but this is true in the .22 calibers. For ground squirrles and chucks the A-max is great and very accurate, but tends to blow up on coyotes. Still when all is said and done, I think the 223 or 22-250 is a better choice for the song dogs. What was it that Robert Ruark said about the 220 Swift? - "I wouldn't use that caliber on anything I had any respect for, even a dog", or something to that effect. I still think the 243 is tough to beat for coyotes, if that was all I was after. For a mixed bag of fox and coyote, I would pick the 223 or 22-250.

    Woody

  4. #4
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    Default Woody's right - use a 40gn

    Definitely try a different bullet. A colleague here uses a 40gn Nosler BT for professional shooting (very successfully, too - approx 6000 rds a year), & has harvested a number of dingos with it in a 20/223 wildcat that pretty much matches the 204 in performance.

    Point is, the 40gn Nosler, to quote Boddington, is "heavy for calibre" & therefore penetrates well (better than 40 & 50gn 224 cal). The solid copper base is usually all that's left is often recovered on off-side of animals shot over 200 metres.

    I don't know much about 'yotes, but this bloke has shot feral cats, dogs & on one occasion a huge pig with this round, and the only projectile he uses is a 40gn Nosler BT. I know one shot on a pig doesn't make it a giant-eater, but he's a professional who knows what he's doing. (have a look at this: http://www.nioa.net.au/gallery/g_wilkie.aspx ) That rifle is a sako on about its 4th barrel, this time in 20 cal made by using a 204 reamer stopped short at the length of a 223 headspace. Works a treat & is easy/cheap to load for (just use 204 dies filed down to 223 length, & 223 brass).

    He reckons it's the solid base Balistic Tip that does the trick!

  5. #5
    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    32g is too light, common sense says that. I use 40g on my .22wmr and it gets the job done.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

  6. #6

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    Not really wanting to get into a pissing contest wiff ya Marv but back in the 70's I killed a hundred or better coyotes with a 25 grain bullet in a 17 Remington. So the common sense thing aint the bullet weight but rather the bullet construction! What the boys above are eluding to is that most of the well constructed 204 bullets happen to be 40 grains.

    The 22wmr isn't in the same league as the 204 no matter what weight bullet your shooting out of it. The 22 mag will kill a coyote but the shots that I'm usually taking would rule out the rimfire because of the poky time of flight that it has to offer, not to mention trajectory!

    I'm not going to write off the 204 yet. However I just got in a mini 14 in 223 and I'm gonna play with it with 40 grain Noslers for a while.

    The thing that drew me to the 204 to start with was the 4250fps with the 32 gr bullet. Upping to a 40 grainer in the 204 puts it on par with what a 40 grainer in a 223 will do. I was wanting more! It all boiled down to lead time for running shots. Mostly I was just treading on new ground, playing with something new!

  7. #7
    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    No prob. But I know that the most likely caliber for my next rifle will be a .204. It is a quick little round and flat shooting, and all I'll shoot is 40g and above with it or whatever is available.
    That 17Rem is in a league all its own, a screamer. I have a cousin that had one before and it was deadly accurate with factory loads.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

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