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Thread: Any 450 Marlin pet loads out there?

  1. #1

    Default Any 450 Marlin pet loads out there?

    I am starting to reload my 450 Marlin, and was just looking for a good starting place. Not looking to reinvent the wheel, I am looking for both plinking loads and thumpers. I do not have any bullets yet, but have a couple hundred once fired cases.

    Not as much information for the 450 marlin on the net yet. So any help would be great. Thanks

  2. #2

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    I should prolly throw a bit more info out there. Shooting the Marlin Guide gun with the 18.5" non-ported barrel. Also, I have a box of 405gr WLNGC cast bullets, but am not tied to just using those bullets.

  3. #3
    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    I do not load for the 450 but if you can find data that indicates that the case capacity is the same as for the 40/70, and I don’t know if it is, but suspect it, then you could try the following load for a heavy hitter. For a 45/70 I use Remington brass, WRL primer, and an air cooled lead bullet of wheel weight + 4% tin from an RCBS 45-405 mould that weighs approximately 425 grains. The powder charge is listed as 46 to 53 grains of Reloader #7. If you can positively verify that the case capacity is the same for the 450 as it is for the 45/70, I would then suggest that you start at the low end with one cartridge loaded with each powder charge and shoot each one over the chronograph. When you get to 2000 fps STOP, that is going to be your maximum. In my situation (45/70) with the Remington brass (least capacity of all the brands) I topped out with 50 grains. It is important to remember that the action of these Marlins is far weaker than most any bolt gun and the normal indicators of excessive pressure such as flattened or cratered primers, sticky cases etc. do not show up until you have reached pressures that will have long since turned your Marlin into a hand grenade. The ONLY reliable indicator of excessive pressure in the Marlin is good load data (and what I gave you is NOT good data because you don’t know me, or where I got it and its for a cartridge different that what you are loading) and a chronograph. You MUST have both to make full power, yet safe loads for the Guide Gun if you are to sleep well and have confidence in what you have loaded. Proceed with extreme caution, keep on digging around in magazines (Handloader ammunition reloading journal) and on the internet (Powder Manufacture web sites etc.) and if you find a load that mirrors mine for your 450 then give it a try. If you are unable to find a good load, just stick with the factory stuff and then dig around some more in a few months. It seems like the 45/70 and 450 seem to generate a fair amount of interest and there will be more info available soon I would bet. On second thought, I would go have a look thru the new Hornady book and see if it has loads for the 450, I seem to remember that this cartridge was their brain baby but my older copy does not have data for it.
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

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    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    I guess I should also point out the obvious…………. Literally thousands of big critters like bison, moose, elk and bears have been killed with a 405 grain lead slug at about 1200 fps. You can safely get allot more velocity out of the modern 45/70 or 450 but it comes with a heck of allot more recoil. And I am here to tell you, that when you start getting up towards 2000 fps, they are really stout, and not fun to shoot at all. It’s just one mans opinion, but if you aint going out looking for trouble with big bears, then 1500 to 1800 fps with a heavy 400 grain “ish” bullet should be adequate for anything.
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

  5. #5

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    Thanks for the tips. I have the Hornady book, but they only had two loads in that version, both of which would be great for a plinking. I was hoping someone had done much of the work, considering the popularity of the guide gun, and had some pet loads already worked out. Of course verification of load data would be done.Thanks again.

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    I like the Kodiak 405 with 52.0 grains of H322 for my "bear load." The most accurate I have found out of my GG is using the Hornady 350 with 44.0 grains of H4198. It will shoot one big cloverleaf all day with that load and is also fairly mild as far as recoil goes. My GG didn't really like the new factory loaded LeverEvolution 325's that much , but my .450M BLR does pretty good with those.
    The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, the filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any group of animals I have ever seen. Thank God for the United States Marine Corps! (Eleanor Roosevelt, 1945)

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    Default Marlin lever actions

    A few years ago I was stocking rifles for a custom rifle shop that was a pretty " high end " operation , I didn't make that much money but I was able to talk to and visit with people from the firearm industry I wouldn't have had access to otherwise . I was building " guide guns " using Marlin actions back in 1984 using big bore wildcat cartridges and developing my own loads from scratch . I had access to one of Marlins engineers through the shop I was working in and placed many phone calls concerning load developement . The word from Marlin was that extraction is the limiting factor with their action , when a load starts to get hot extraction will get sticky . Figure the rest out for yourself , reloading manuals are great for reference but not much else due to the involvement of attorneys . P.O. Ackley's wildcat book is the gospel .

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    Member IceKing02's Avatar
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    Default Stout loads are relative to your size, too...

    As it relates to Alangaq's reply (and no offense intended, Alangaq):

    I don't think of myself as a really tough guy in relationship to recoil. I am also a fairly regular-size guy (5' 10 and 175lbs). I shoot a modest amount of rounds every week (75rds of 12gauge, 0-40rds of rifle/pistol).
    I have only my own anecdotal evidence to put forth the following observations:

    Every big, tough guy to whom I have handed my Winchester 94 in .450 Marlin or my '95 in .405WCF has handed it back and asked not to shoot it again. And this was with regular 350grain factor loads...By the same token these guys can shoot heavier pistol rounds and more of them at every range session. I'm betting that if you are a smaller guy you would have to get yourself some fairly stout loads and try to shoot 20+ rounds from a bench before you are going to start having problems with recoil.

    Once the weather warms up a bit, PM me and we'll get out to chrono some .450 loads. I have about four or five different loads that I have loaded up so far. Both cast and jacketed bullets with 350gr to 430gr cast. I have a chrony with PC-software to compile the results and I'd like to have the data from both a Winchester and a Marlin. Lemme know when you're up for it as I have a Birchwood pass...Hell, maybe we can get a whole raft of .450 shooters together and chrony a bunch of rounds all at once! Then the results can be compiled to see what shakes out in terms of performance data, tweak it for accuracy, and marry it to a particular rifle...Sounds like an excuse for a party to me!

    IceKing02

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    Default

    My Marlin has the longer barrel and a muzzle brake, so the difference in barrel harmonics may make this irrelevant for your gun.... Anyway, my model 1895M prefers 300 grn bullets and H-4198, loaded fairly hot. Barnes 300grn originals in front of 54.5 grns H-4198, and 300grn. partitions in front of 53.0 grns H-4198 both group 1.5" or less at 100yds. Both loads use winchester primers. Cartridge OAL runs 2.550. These are strong loads, so inch up to them.

  10. #10

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    I would gladly donate my rifle and shoulder for some testing at Birchwood. I have shot 405GR Cast loads, and buffalo bores, and the hornady ammo, and survived just fine. (I thank my limbsaver.) My Marlin does not like the hornady leverevolution ammo though.

  11. #11
    Member IceKing02's Avatar
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    Default How's bout we wait until the temps are better?

    I'm not interested in freezing my fingertips off just yet...I've kinda got used to 'em. They make tapping on this computer just SO simple!

    Let's wait until the temps are >40F and get out there to make it happen--hopefully that's prior to May... My little '94 is ready anytime.

    IceKing02

  12. #12

    Default Deal

    I am not interested in freezing my fingers off.

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