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Thread: Tire Help

  1. #1
    Member PatrickH's Avatar
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    Default Tire Help

    I have been reading the tire posts trying to figure out what I need. I am new to the 4x4 game and need some adivce. I recently bought a 1999 Suzuki Quadrunner 500. It seems to have tons of power. However the power was useless when I got stuck in some deep mud. I got more winching experience than I wanted.
    I not a hot dogger and usually try to find the driest way to get somewhere to hunt, fish, and explore. However going anywhere in Alaska seems to involve getting through some nasty mud holes first. I would like to minimize my winching time in the future. I got a good deal on some Carlisle Badlands XTRa radials. They are better than the stock tires. They are great on the trails, but they seem to plug up in the gooey mud. Maybe anything would have.
    What do you riders in South Central Alaska like for a good trail tire that does not leave you stuck in the mud? Should I consider going with a taller or wider tire? I would like to stay with the stock rims. Any advise would be appreciated.
    Patrick

  2. #2
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    I use Kenda mud dawgs. same style as the wooley boogers of old. They work great plus they are cheap.

    Granted they are not the ITP's or mudlites etc, but I go where they do. I cant complain.

  3. #3
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Wider and taller....

    In this case, bigger is better! Your bike should have enough power to turn 1-2" taller than stock tires without any problems. Usually the front tires are 8 or 9" wide so they steer easier. If you have problems with the front end diving into holes then go with the 10" fronts and 12" rears. I recently bumped my 6x6 tires up to 1" wider on the rear and 2" wider on the front. I couldn't go taller because of clearance issues with the tandem rear axles. These are the tires I ended up getting -

    http://www.swamp-witch.com/

    They clear the mud really well! We were out at Pt. Mckenzie this weekend and it went through some serious tundra mud and never clogged up the tread. They are kind of heavy, but are 6-ply and super tough.

    Don't know if you saw this thread - http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...read.php?t=481

    But there are some photos of before/after with my 6x6.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  4. #4

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    any thing bigger/more aggresive than stock will help. mud lites are good all around, 589's clean like nobodys business for a trail tire...it's all on what you want to spend abd how aggresive you'd like to get

  5. #5

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    The Quadrunner 500 has plenty of power to turn 27" tires without any problems. The tires get close to the fender but on my father-in-laws quadrunner there is no rubbing. I agree, Bigger is Better.

    There are many tires out on the market that will suite your needs. 589's, mudbugs, mud lites, XTR's, swampwitch/MST, vamps, and swamplites.

    Seriously, any of those will be 10x's better than what you have now, and each will performs similar in the same conditions. Some will perform better than others but I do not think the difference between them will justify going in depth on each individual tire. I have my own preferences.

    The tires listed above are some of the most commonly used tires in Alaska. They are proven in our terrain and IMO are the best choices for all around conditions. Whichever set of tires you get the best deal on is the set I would buy.

  6. #6
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Default another thing to look for.....

    is a tire with some degree of sidewall tread. I was looking pretty hard at the 589's but they had nothing on the sidewalls. There are several tires which offer tread that wraps around the side of the tire a bit which will really help in the ruts as well as help protect the rim.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  7. #7
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    Riding technique is as important as the aggressive tires. I took a couple of friends moose hunting in the Tanana flats one year and they had big tires on their machines. I would go through swamps which was so deep I was floating part of the time. I would ease into it and come out the other side. They would gun their machines and bury themselves. The 589s dug themselves right in. I told them to ease up on the throttle which they did and we all started "floating"though it. I know that some of you are going to Pooh Pooh this but keep it in mind when you are out there and see if it doesn't help.

    I tend to run a lot of hard pack trails and rocks most of the time but I do get in some real quagmires sometimes too so I have stuck with the stock tires on all three of the quads that I have owned. I'm not saying that I would pass up a free set of upgraded tires but I am not convinced that they are needed for my application.

  8. #8

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    Contender I do agree with you that rider technique is very crucial when it comes to riding atv's. Sometimes that is an overlooked secret. Like I said above, my father-in-law has a quadrunner with 27" tires, 589 M/T to be exact, but he cant ride worth a darn. Agressive aftermarket tires are a huge advantage in my opinion. They are much tougher than standard 2 ply OEM tires and have much more grip. Eventhough some dont know how to ride their machines that will come with time and pratice. You cant expect to slap on some HL Outlaws and expect to be the baddest dog in the cage.

    When the same two machines pull up to a bottomless mudhole and one machine has stock tires and the other has a more aggressive tread the machine with aftermarket tires will always win with correct rider input. In a way you can compare aftermarket tires to rifles. I dont care what caliber rifle someone has, if they cant shoot it whats the point? But if they do know how to use it, look out. But becoming skilled with a firearm takes practice right? Same thing with atv tires.

  9. #9
    Member PatrickH's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    Thanks for the advice so far. I can certainly use help with my riding skills. However I would like to make it harder to blame getting stuck on my tires or setup. Is there a rule of thumb on how much bigger of a tire I can get without having to make modifications to the 4x4 or get different rims? I was thinking of 26" and a size wider than stock. I usually just putt around, but I do not want to strain or break something because I got tires that are too large.
    Thanks again.
    Patrick

  10. #10
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    Patrick
    If you go with 26" and a size wider I dont think you will have too much of a problem. Thats still pretty close to stock and the suzuki should have the power to turn them. Its all a learning curve. you will get stuck (who doesnt?), but its all good. Its the only way you can learn. Dont worry just buy some good rubber and run with it.

  11. #11

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    Dont worry just buy some good rubber and run with it.
    Exactly.

    If you decided to go with 27" tires I doubt you will have any problems considering many stock machines run 27" tires without any problems. 26" tires will be a good compromise though. The Quadrunner 500 is one stout machine that is built like a brick turd house.

    I like I said whichever set or brand of tires you get the best deal on is the ones I would buy. The quadrunner has plenty of power to turn 12" tires in the rear and 10" in the front. The wider tires will float over mud much better than narrower tires.

  12. #12
    Member PatrickH's Avatar
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    Default What I bought

    I ended up buying the Mud Lite XLs at Go Pro. I went with 26x12x12 rear and 26x9x12 on front (did not have 10s). I was going to get them from the Lower and have Carlisle barge them up, but the savings on tires alone was not significant enough. I would have gone with the Mud Bugs at Johnsons, but they did not have any of the 12" and did not expect a new shipment. I will need to work on my riding technique still, but hopefully the new tires will keep me from winching too often.
    Thanks for the advice.
    Patrick

  13. #13
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    Default

    You will love the Mud Lites. Great choice. And I think on that size machine you made a wise choice with 9 wides on the front.

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