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Thread: Mooring bouy

  1. #1

    Default Mooring bouy

    Had a mishap with a mooring bouy one day, woke up and the steel ball was on one side of the boat and the orange bouy on the other. Not to mention the steel ball banging against the hull a few times in the night. I learned a tremendous amount about tying up to them that day. Anyone care to offer some good advise about proper use, especially the steel ones? I have my own theory and would like to hear some others. -Thanks

  2. #2

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    The few times I have tied up to a bouy we let out about 50' of rope and then tied a sea anchor to the stern of the boat. The sea anchor will pull the boat away from the mooring bouy and as the tide turns around the boat will just swing around the bouy.

  3. #3

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    I like the sea anchor idea. I had tied off with about a boats length of rope to a orange bouy attached to a steel bouy that had about 10ft between the two. By morning it was one on each side of the boat down in the outdrive, the boat drifted right over it all at some point to cause the hang up. I had thought about tying up tight to the steel ball, as I have a three foot anchor pulpit, but that could beat the crap out of everything in any kind of chop. I like the soft mooring bouys, the steel ones don't seem like a good idea.

  4. #4

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    The way to eliminate getting the mooring bouy line tangled in the outdrives is to grab the bouys line at low tide and pull in as much line as you can then tie a cinder block or any other weight that will stay tied on. the weight will keep the anchor line between it and the bouy at a greater angle which should keep the line clear of the outdrives.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by LastSplash View Post
    The way to eliminate getting the mooring bouy line tangled in the outdrives is to grab the bouys line at low tide and pull in as much line as you can then tie a cinder block or any other weight that will stay tied on. the weight will keep the anchor line between it and the bouy at a greater angle which should keep the line clear of the outdrives.
    Doesn't doing this just pull you closer to the bouy??

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  6. #6

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    I am guessing the norm is only one bouy, not two, and a steel one is like attaching yourself to a floating rock. Although any wind, current, waves, etc, should push you away from it. But, I was attached to it in dead calm water and it lingered around the boat. I have used this mooring bouy a few times and only got messed up once, and after that really questioned using it. First, I tied a line only a few feet to the steel ball, the orange bouy floated around on its own line without enough length to reach the outdrive. In dead calm water in the middle of the night during the tide change the boat touched the steel ball as it turned. The next time I tied to the orange bouy, steel ball touched again as it passed in the night, but now the two had hung on each side of the boat with the outdrive hooking the lines. I can't see a good way to have a steel mooring bouy involved at all in any of the set ups, am I correct on that or am I missing something? -Thanks

  7. #7

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    The cinder block goes on the anchor line on the mooring bouy, that way the anchor line is deeper.

  8. #8

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    I think we are misunderstanding each other (maybe), the mooring bouy is a floating steel ball anchored permantly in two hundred feet of water in the middle of a huge cove.

  9. #9

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    My apologies, I misunderstood you and just now realized what you meant. -Thanks for the info.

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