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Thread: Kodiak - Any Halibut from shore?

  1. #1
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    Default Kodiak - Any Halibut from shore?

    Hi,

    I'm planning a return trip to Kodiak this year for either July or September. Last time we took a charter and caught halibut within 150 yards of the shore near Chiniak. This year, I'm planning to bring my 13' surf rod and try surf fishing for them. Has anyone had any success in Kodiak fishing from shore for halibut? Is there a better time of year when they come in closer to shore?

    Any suggestions about good shore fishing locations along the road system? (looking for deeper water within a 80-100 yard casting distance)

    Thanks,
    Gary

  2. #2
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Default

    someone caught a 200 pounder in the channel once
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  3. #3

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    Zachar Bay Lodge, on the Westside, talks about a 300 pounder caught off their dock too.

    You probably drive past a bunch of opportunity on the road to Chiniak. You may have to hike down to the bays, but then again, you may have to climb back up with a big fish...
    I figured out a way to kill the massing silvers on the points in Monashka Bay from the trail 50-60 feet above the water, but that's my little secret....

    Wood Beach and the other Pasagshak beaches might produce if the epic triple overhead glassy peeling lefty gnar surf lets you consider finding some structure in the sand bottom.
    Anton Larsen Bay might be a spot to check out too. Just driving over is great.

    Maybe look for halibut habitat you can access with a chart and quad sheet?

    You know, a 2-liter soda bottle and little wind and tide can carry a bait way out there..


  4. #4

    Default 2 liter soda bottle...

    Great idea Ishmael, some of the shorecasters here in Hawaii (it's a big deal here; they've got a "over 100" lb. club for big ulua's;Jack Crevelle family) will use inflated balloons to achieve the same effect, plus I would imagine that being lighter than a bottle would work well in lighter offshore winds. Sometimes guys even catch tuna's, Mahi-mahi's, even small Marlin.
    Of course, you could always paddle the bait way out on your surf board, then catch the waves on the way back in!
    Jim

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim View Post
    Great idea Ishmael, some of the shorecasters here in Hawaii (it's a big deal here; they've got a "over 100" lb. club for big ulua's;Jack Crevelle family) will use inflated balloons to achieve the same effect, plus I would imagine that being lighter than a bottle would work well in lighter offshore winds. Sometimes guys even catch tuna's, Mahi-mahi's, even small Marlin.
    Of course, you could always paddle the bait way out on your surf board, then catch the waves on the way back in!
    Jim
    Are Ulua anything like trevali in the South Seas? A big honkin wad of muscle with a hard tail that feels like you hooked a golf cart?

    Must be a hoot!


    Kodiak has fantastic surf. Breaks everywhere. Directly under the N Star from where you are....

    I've thought about using 2 liter bottles to drift a "school" of baited hooks or jigs on weighted droppers tied to the necks of the individually free-floating bottles. The bottles would be capped with a little water in them to hold them inverted like little buoys.
    I'd ride herd on this flotilla with a kayak....

    You guys got lots of albacore down there, don't you?....


  6. #6

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    Yup. Prime time is late July through early September. Hot spots are any river mouth with a little extra depth (e.g., Pasagshak is better than Olds, which is better than American or Buskin). The beach at Chiniak, probably right about where you were getting them a little deeper is also prime. Twin Creeks, Roselyn and Myrtle can be good too.

    One refinement we use is to dump a small skiff or pontoon boat in as the weather allows, row offshore 100 yards or so, dump your bait and row back. Pull the boat back up on the beach for a rod rest. Surf rods would be good, but this saves long casts and lets you use large capacity reels that aren't as good for casting.

    And you'll need the large capacity unless you have the boat to chase them. In the shallows with nowhere to go but far, far away they fight a whole bunch harder that when can get on top of them in a boat. Biggest we ever managed to land was 125#, and we thought it was a whole bunch bigger. Used up most of 600 yards of 80# line on a good rod and reel combo. We've broken fish off at the bottom of the spool, but who knows how big they were.

    Top bait is pink salmon, cuzz that's what they've come to feed on in the shallows and off the river mouths. Have caught them on spoons, but that's a lot slower and prone to snags when you're sweeping bottom from shore.

  7. #7
    Member Tolman24's Avatar
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    Default Halibut from the bank.

    When camping around Deep Creek we have set bait at low tide and wait for the water to get deep with high tide. At low tide we would bait up with a heavy weight and salmon carcass with some squid to make sure we kept some bait. After casting out as far as possible we took the rod back above high water mark and set it in a STRONG rod holder. Went about our business of re-hydrating and exercising the vocal cords. When the tide comes in so might the butts. We don't catch a lot but usually come up with a couple of decent chickens 20 - 30 lbs.

    In the lakes of NM we have used empty gallon milk jugs to fish catfish. Tie 80 lb mono with a large treble hook and a bunch of chicken liver on to the sealed jug. Set them around the cove about sunset and when night comes use a flashlight or the moon to watch the jugs. When a jug takes off, row out in a skiff and pull it in. Come to think about it we were usually re-hydrating then as well.

  8. #8
    Member monello's Avatar
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    [quote=Tolman24;202513]When camping around Deep Creek we have set bait at low tide and wait for the water to get deep with high tide. At low tide we would bait up with a heavy weight and salmon carcass with some squid to make sure we kept some bait. After casting out as far as possible we took the rod back above high water mark and set it in a STRONG rod holder. Went about our business of re-hydrating and exercising the vocal cords. When the tide comes in so might the butts. We don't catch a lot but usually come up with a couple of decent chickens 20 - 30 lbs.

    What type of setup did you use? Weight size, line size, hook size, rod size?

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