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Thread: Japanese "Freestyle or Butterfly" Jigging Technique

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    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    Default Japanese "Freestyle or Butterfly" Jigging Technique

    Ever used the Japanese style metal jigs for salmon? The long thin oneís with the sharp hook on a short leader attached to the top of the jig??

    I began experimenting with these jigs last year for salmon and halibut ( Killed the silvers and did catch a 330 pounder on one in August!!) Which jig? http://www.river2seausa.com/t/searock.html If you see one in a store they look exactly like a herring!

    They come under several names like butterfly jigs from Shimano or Free Style jigs in the Bass Pro Shops catalog.

    At Thanksgiving I had the opportunity to fish Panama with Ben Secrest from Accurate reels and George Large from Rapala and European professional fisherman, Nicola Zingerelli from Spain (owner of carnx.com) and Hideyuki Kitamura (Charmas) and his translator Setsu Hamanaka. Charmas is a true master of traditional Japanese jig fishing. The other guys are very very good as well.

    The lures themselves are only a small part of the actual technique. The rod selection is critical as the rod imparts the action on the jig. Some of these rods can be upwards to 1000 dollars. However companies like Lamiglass have a jigging series of rods that will work just fine and are not expensive. There are different techniques to go with different situations. Each has itís own unique cadence that the fisherman uses to make the jig look like different types of prey. The cadence of the retrieve can make a jig look like a crab, squid or small bait fish.
    Having seen a true master at this technique I can tell you that there is a lot to being good at it. Like any type of fishing if you put in the time and experiment a little I think it will be just as or more effective than anything we do up here on Salmon and halibut.

    I invited the Japanese master to come up in June and fish with me for a week. I am thinking that after that, I will be ready to write a decent article on applying these techniques to Alaskaís game fish.

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    Default Hog on a butterfly jig...

    Here is a photo of the unlucky hog halibut....
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Default Hog Halibut

    A halibut that size must have come from the Fairweather Grounds!!
    I have bought a few of those stlye of jigs and have big plans for them this year. They look like a big needle fish.

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    Default free deckhand

    Capt, I hereby volunteer to serve as a free-of-charge deckhand for that week. While I've never been short on catching halibut, I've never been able to master jigging, effectively...and I still get impatient when fishing circles. This jig (and technique) sounds interesting.

    So, far one of my favorite jigs has been one from the guys at Kodiak Custom Tackle. I bought one at the Sportsmans Show a few years ago, and haven't managed to lose it yet (knock on wood).

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    Default

    That fish came from about 230' off of Cape Elrington. Must have been traveling through as it was long enought to go well over 400 but was skinny and her belly was all scraped up......

  6. #6

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    Ever see a homemade jig using a weighted hook at either end of a 6" piece of McDonald's soda straw?

    A hoochiee skirt makes the aft end more appealing and sink slower too..

  7. #7

    Default Yo-Zuri

    I've been using the Yo-Zuri hydro jig for about three years now. I get the 7oz blue and green from Sportsman's Warehouse and they work great. The rod I use is a 8' trolling Lamiglas/Fenwick and routinely catch Kings and Halibut. The halibut usually pick this thing up on the down stroke, I like to use a quick jerk of the rod about three or four feet. This seems to really get the jig to dance.

    AKCAPT,

    Last year you were talking about getting a new de-hooker for Halibut fishing....how did it work?

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    Default Cadence

    The hydro metal jig is one of the early ones. There is a lot of science that has gone into the development of these jigs. Check out http://www.anglers-proshop.com/ This store is all about the technique and lures.

    Getting bit on the drop is what the "cadence" is all about. It is difficult to explain but one of the techniques is like this:

    Grab a rod and reel set up and slowly turn the handle in a circle, keeping the rod pointed at the water.
    Every time the handle comes straight up lift the rod to about 45 degrees, like you are going pointing it at the tops of the mountians.

    Keep reeling steady for 10 turns/lifts and drop it back.

    That is the best I can do to explain the bottomfish jigging cadence. The faster you turn the handle the more frequently you will jig the rod.

    Sorry I can't explain it any better than that.

    The rod I brought to Panama is the same one we use for jigging on my boats which is the 6'6" G. loomis Bucara. Charmas, the Japanse master was impressed with the action for 200 - 300 gram jigs. I know the other guy on the trip said he worked with Lamaiglass to develop their line of jig rods.
    one of the critical parts is that the rodhas to be light and comfortable so you can crank like that all day long.

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    Member FISHFACE's Avatar
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    Default

    when you say keep reeling steady for about ten minutes how much depth are you going to gain? In a lot of the areas that I fish out of you would going to the surface in no time at all. Just curious how much you change the cadence depending on depth?
    Boatless

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    Member FISHFACE's Avatar
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    10 turns..... not 10 minutes
    I'm going to have to stop by boat this spring and see how you do that. Hope the kennel is still working for you.
    Boatless

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    Member Tolman24's Avatar
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    Default follow up ?

    AKCapt, I appreciate your sharing this with us. I am a bit of a shallow reader so I have a couple of clarification question below and question on lure size. What weight lure did you use for halibut and what weight for silvers?

    Quote Originally Posted by AKCAPT View Post
    The hydro metal jig is one of the early ones. There is a lot of science that has gone into the development of these jigs. Check out http://www.anglers-proshop.com/ This store is all about the technique and lures.

    Getting bit on the drop is what the "cadence" is all about. It is difficult to explain but one of the techniques is like this:

    Grab a rod and reel set up and slowly turn the handle in a circle, keeping the rod pointed at the water.
    Every time the handle comes straight up lift the rod to about 45 degrees, like you are going pointing it at the tops of the mountians.

    Keep reeling steady for 10 turns/lifts and drop it back.
    When you say 10 turns/lifts are you raising the rod to 45 and immediately dropping and then reel for one more turn and up 45 and back down? After 10 times free reel back to the bottom to do it again?

    That is the best I can do to explain the bottomfish jigging cadence. The faster you turn the handle the more frequently you will jig the rod.

    Sorry I can't explain it any better than that.

    The rod I brought to Panama is the same one we use for jigging on my boats which is the 6'6" G. loomis Bucara. Charmas, the Japanse master was impressed with the action for 200 - 300 gram jigs. I know the other guy on the trip said he worked with Lamaiglass to develop their line of jig rods.
    one of the critical parts is that the rodhas to be light and comfortable so you can crank like that all day long.

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    lift.....reel in 10 turns.......lower rod.......lift......reel in 10 turns......lower rod.......repeat 8 more times..........lower jig to bottom and start again. Continue to do this until you hook a fish or your arms fall off.

  13. #13

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    Hmmmm....I understand the following to mean you are going to lift each time you turn the reel handle one full turn, right at the top of the turn:

    "Every time the handle comes straight up lift the rod to about 45 degrees, like you are going pointing it at the tops of the mountians.

    Keep reeling steady for 10 turns/lifts and drop it back."

    Not one lift per 10 turns of the handle....maybe AKCAPT can post a video of how it's done? Or do we just have to go fishing with him?
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

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    Sounds a little complicated...

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ishmael View Post
    Sounds a little complicated...
    Not complicated..............Just a lot of work.

    Here's a couple of video links

    http://www.isonbo.com/video/2006jiging/2006jiging.html

    More Videos

    http://www.isonbo.com/jigingvideo.htm

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    Default Cadnece

    It is not complicated at all. I just did a crappy job of explaining it

    so every time you turn the handle 360 degrees ( one full revolution of the handle)lift the rod up towards the sky. Keep reeling steadly but every time the handle points up you lift the rod. Repeat this 10 revolutions and drop it back.
    This allows the jig to work the lower 25 or so feet of the bottom. For the most part where Kings and Halibut like to swim.

    It should be a smooth reeling motion with a lift to match the retrieve.

    I am sure if you look up Butterfly Jigging or Deep Jigging on Google someone smarter than me has explained it better.

    It is easy, has great hook ups and works.

    I guess in comparison it is way way more complicated than lowering a salmon head to the bottom and waiting for the rod to double over.

    It is also more like sportfishing where working your lure fools the fish and that is what makes so fun

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    Member FISHFACE's Avatar
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    makes much more sense now with that video and your explanation. that would kick your a s s if you did that all day at the rate those guys were doing it, but going to give it a try this year. how many ounces were you using with those jigs akcapt.
    Boatless

  18. #18

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    Great, so I'm walking around the lab where I work, practicing the hand motions as described for this kind of jigging...and it's only January...you just had to start another thread about jigging, didn't you Capt?
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

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    Member Tolman24's Avatar
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    Default Thanks Captn

    I understand now. What size reel and rod did you use? This sounds like fun and a good workout.

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    Default

    Nikster,

    That's funny! I know it's the end of January and I am hooking up heaters and chipping the ice of my boats getting them ready......I think I need to be somewhere warm in the winter where I can fish more....

    The video's are good but in the cold water, I would slow that cadence way down. Slow retrieve and slow lift...Not such a brutal workout that way too.

    The jigs are measured by grams and I would say 100 grams for salmon and 200 for halibut in most cases. Heavier in strong current.

    As far as tackle you want a rod with a good parabolic bend in it like in the video. The smaller Avets or Accurate conventionals or a high quality spinner like a Shimano Stella works as well. I am just not really comforable with spinning tackle myself.

    Anyway, I think it is an interesting technique and worth giving it some time. I imagine on my boat with 12 fishermen all working those jigs, it will look like a school of Herring.....

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